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tim0901

Member
  • Content Count

    349
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About tim0901

  • Title
    Member
  • Birthday January 9

Profile Information

  • Location
    England
  • Gender
    Male
  • Occupation
    Student

System

  • CPU
    Intel i7 4790k
  • Motherboard
    Gigabyte G1 Sniper Z97
  • RAM
    16gb Corsair Vengeance Pro Red
  • GPU
    Zotac GTX 780
  • Case
    Corsair Carbide 300R
  • Storage
    Samsung 840 250GB, 3TB Seagate Barracuda
  • PSU
    Corsair RM750
  • Display(s)
    LG 24MT48D
  • Cooling
    Be Quiet Pure Rock
  • Keyboard
    Tiny KB-9805
  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro

Recent Profile Visitors

1,329 profile views
  1. Thankfully it seems that only game data has been taken, which in the grand scheme of things isn't particularly useful (what game company is ever going to risk the legal shitshow that would occur from looking at it, let alone paying for it?) The only people interested in this stuff really will be other hacking groups and modders. Had the hack involved user or employee data, things would be far more serious.
  2. Personally I think it should be called the Z-Slide. Could make a sick advert with some help from good old DJ Casper. Slide to the left!
  3. This isn't "unhackable" at all - it's just cryptography. It's based upon a Simon cipher which - while efficient to run on hardware - is certainly not an impenetrable cipher given enough time. Indeed, Simon is criticised by security researchers due to how close attacks have gotten to breaking it - they are already getting ~70% of the way there despite it only being released in 2015. This much is even stated by one of the inventors in an interview: As he explains in that same interview, the idea here is to prevent a single type of attack - Remote Code Execution - by ma
  4. Indeed I hadn't considered iGPUs. Certainly there it would make more sense to run on the CPU - especially on consoles where you have a fixed set of hardware. Yes, because DLSS can't do this. Even DLSS 2.0 requires information provided by the game outside of the video signal - this is why it can't be enabled as a driver-level feature that works on every game out there. The Nvidia shield doesn't use DLSS to upscale video - it uses its own AI model to do this - which adds up with the marketing for the feature not mentioning DLSS anywhere. As far as AMD's marketing is co
  5. This won't be done on the CPU, simply because of the inefficiency of doing so. Sending that much data from the GPU framebuffer (~53MB per frame at 4k) to the CPU and back will take a not-insignificant amount of time. And this problem only gets worse and worse the higher your framerate. At 100fps, this transfer alone would be using a third of the bandwidth provided by an x16 PCI-E 4.0 link, leaving much less time per frame for any processing at either end and likely restricting the feature to systems with that full 4.0x16 link available. (That is unless you were to introduce a frame delay, but
  6. I guess this is the death of the Surface Neo as well then. Shame. While I never would have wanted one (as a first-gen product), I thought it was a very interesting concept.
  7. Luggage tags are for when the airline's tag gets ripped off during processing, so that the luggage handlers can get it where it's meant to go - this is generally a listed requirement in the ts&cs when flying. Those handlers aren't going to remove your tag and pillage your stuff, because it's their job to deal with it and doing so would get them fired. Outside of the airport, yes luggage tags are generally considered completely useless. That is generally my experience with losing things, yes. If I lose it, it's gone. And the statistics back this up - only ~10-20% of lost item
  8. Personally I find this tidbit much more interesting - no Xeon in a Mac Pro?
  9. I'm not sure how accurate this is. Google trends looks at how often people are searching for the term through the search engine, not how many people are accessing the service. Given that over 80% of Facebook users use the service solely through the app, it makes sense that the amount of people searching the word "facebook" has trended down since 2010 - back when the main internet device for many people was still a laptop. You aren't seeing the drop of Facebook's importance in that graph - you're seeing the adoption of the smartphone. Indeed, Facebook reported that they
  10. Not at competitive framerates of course, but it's definitely playable. https://www.userbenchmark.com/PCGame/FPS-Estimates-League-of-Legends/3761/7824.0.0.0.0 League isn't exactly a difficult game to run.
  11. I definitely would not buy a GTX 570 in 2021. That thing is ancient (2010) and does not have modern driver support. Also 1.2GB of VRAM is... ouch.
  12. Looks fairly legit, although I absolutely hate the idea of spending $100+ (including shipping) on a 750ti... That being said, buying on ebay is pretty much as safe as you get when buying second-hand. They have very good buyer protection these days, so if it turns out not to be legit then it should be pretty easy to request a refund. (I'd still pay with a credit card for an extra level of safety though)
  13. The Win 10 people got to run through QEMU is the shitty ARM version, which you can't buy a license for as a user - they're only available to OEMs. If you're ok with breaking piracy laws to do this then go ahead, but anyone wanting to do actual work on that machine shouldn't be doing so as it's just not worth it. As far as most users are concerned: no, you can't run Win 10 on M1 macs.
  14. You pretty much can't get any GPU at the moment on that budget, except for ancient designs from 15 years ago that have been sitting in the back of the warehouse gathering dust. Even two generation old cards are selling for more than that at the moment. Just save your money and wait.
  15. This is a really complicated question because of the sorts of things both entities will be doing with their cash reserves, but if we go purely by what they have in the bank then the answer is no, they don't have more money than the EU. The same is true if you're talking yearly income - the EU's income is larger than Microsoft's. EU (the governing body, not a sum of the income of all member states): Yearly Income (gross): €148.2 Billion Gold and Cash reserves: €470.7 Billion Total Assets (including cash reserves): €4.671 Trillion Microsoft: Yearly Inc
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