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Disk vs Internet usage

Tylerebowers
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Could someone explain to me why 100MB/s on a disk equals 900Mbps over internet; look at the attached image. 

 

Captura.PNG

 

Also dont mind that my computer is in spanish. Memoria=Ram, Disco=disk, Red=Wifi/Internet

 

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What program is using this bandwidth?

Also:

100 MegaBytes = 1000 Megabits

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1 minute ago, Poet129 said:

What program is using this bandwidth?

Windows File sharing between two PCs; transfering my entire plex library to a dedicated server.

 

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Just now, Tylerebowers said:

Windows File sharing between two PCs; transfering my entire plex library to a dedicated server.

This is correct then check other post under Also:

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5 minutes ago, Poet129 said:

What program is using this bandwidth?

Also:

100 MegaBytes = 1000 Megabits

100MBytes are 800Mbits.

Megabytes and Megabits can be differenciated by the lower or upper case b.
 

b = bits
B = bytes

 

8 bit = 1 Byte

05Gb/s - USB 3.2 Gen 1 (USB 3.0, 3.1 Gen1)

10Gb/s - USB 3.2 Gen 2 (USB 3.1 Gen2)

20Gb/s - USB 3.2 Gen 2x2 

40Gb/s - USB 4.0, Thunderbolt 3, Thunderbolt 4

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5 minutes ago, Poet129 said:

100 MegaBytes = 1000 Megabits

This is incorrect. 100MB/s = 800mbps. 1000mbps = 125MB/s. With overhead in most use use cases you will see around 115MB/s maximum on a gigabit connection.

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Some people discovered that even if computer works on bytes (except on really low level), bits are much smaller. 2 MB/s looks not so good as 16 Mb/s, so internet providers gives you speed in bits. It's much funnier that way and eveyone are happy. Of course it's impossible to receive only half of byte, no matter what. You may try to download any file from internet and interrupt as many times as you want, but you still cannot download only (for example) three bytes out of 8. But hey, who cares. HDD producers also gives you wrong values. 1kB is 1024 bytes, but for them it's 1000 bytes. It's nicer that way. And who cares about 24 bytes, right? Well, you may care when you buying new 4TB hdd and that difference becomes huge, because 4000000000 bytes divided by 1024, then by 1024 and then again by 1024 gives you 3,72 TB - and that is your "4 TB" drive (and may people thinking where they bytes gone). :)

 

 

 

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1 minute ago, homeap5 said:

Some people discovered that even if computer works on bytes (except on really low level), bits are much smaller. 2 MB/s looks not so good as 16 Mb/s, so internet providers gives you speed in bits. It's much funnier that way and eveyone are happy. Of course it's impossible to receive only half of byte, no matter what. You may try to download any file from internet and interrupt as many times as you want, but you still cannot download only (for example) three bytes out of 8. But hey, who cares. HDD producers also gives you wrong values. 1kB is 1024 bytes, but for them it's 1000 bytes. It's nicer that way. And who cares about 24 bytes, right? Well, you may care when you buying new 4TB hdd and that difference becomes huge, because 4000000000 bytes divided by 1024, then by 1024 and then again by 1024 gives you 3,72 TB - and that is your "4 TB" drive (and may people thinking where they bytes gone). :)

 

 

Interesting, I just learned something today. I allways thought that is was weird why 4tb hdds didnt have 4tb avaiable.

 

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31 minutes ago, Tylerebowers said:

Could someone explain to me why 100MB/s on a disk equals 900Mbps over internet; look at the attached image

1 Mbps is  1 million bits per second  ... divide by 8 to get  125,000 bytes per second. 

That's either  125 KB/s  as in thousands of bytes per seconds  OR  ~122 KiB/s  if we're dividing by 1024 (as Windows does when showing on screen even though it shows KB and MB for file sizes in file properties)

So 900 Mbps is approx 900x125 = 112500 KB/s or 112.5 MB/s   .... or it's 109863 KiB/s or  107.28 MiB/s

17 minutes ago, Tylerebowers said:

Interesting, I just learned something today. I allways thought that is was weird why 4tb hdds didnt have 4tb avaiable.

The reason there's these differences is not for the reasons the guy above says.

 

Dial-Up modems specified transmission speed in bauds (sort of like bits), and you have 4200 bauds per second, then 9600 bauds, then we got up to 33 kilobits and 56 kilobits  then moved on to ISDN, DSL, and faster and faster connections.

 

Hard drive manufacturers always specified disk capacity in bytes , or thousand of bytes, then million of bytes.

 

Because of a lot of limitations (ram and disk space was very expensive and processors ran at very low frequencies so every extra instruction would slow down an operating system), programmers of operating systems made a lot of compromises,

One of these compromises was to arrange the drive in small pieces named "sectors" with a fixed size that's a multiple of 2. For  Microsoft operating systems like FAT16 and FAT32, the size of these sectors defaults to 512 bytes.

Basically, a file always starts at the beginning of one such sector, and a sector can only hold one file or a piece of a file, so now instead of saying "this file starts at position 1200000 on the drive and uses 500300 bytes", the file system can simply say "this file starts at sector 1500 on the drive and uses 1000 sectors" ... those two numbers 1500 and 1000 can be stored in fewer bytes in ram and on drive. 

 

Continuing from this compromise, for programmers it was much easier to just change the definition of 1 KB (1000 bytes) to 1024 bytes, because it made computations much faster , as 1024 is 210

So for example let's say you have a file that's  1,600,450 bytes and you want to calculate how much KB or how much MB it uses.

Divisions by 1000 would take A LOT of operations.

If you divide by 1024 it's much easier ... you can just picture the number in binary and remove the last 10 bits:

 

1,600,450  = 1 1000 0110 1011 1100 0010

If you cut the last 10 bits, you end up with 1 1000 0110 10  which in decimal is 1562 ... so a single instruction that's built inside processors would be enough to show you on screen the file size, 1562 KB.

And you can get MB by removing 10 bits again ... so you're left with 1  or 1 MB ... but they were smart to round up to 2 MB and show 2 MB on screen.

 

So that's why drives show up with different values.... those 4 TB on drive label is specific with 1000 as multiplier,  but operating systems kept using 1024 as multiple for backwards compatibility ... so

4 TB  = 4, 000, 000, 000, 000   / 1024 / 1024  = 3,814,697 MB or around 3700 GB

 

 

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1 hour ago, homeap5 said:

Some people discovered that even if computer works on bytes (except on really low level), bits are much smaller. 2 MB/s looks not so good as 16 Mb/s, so internet providers gives you speed in bits. It's much funnier that way and eveyone are happy. Of course it's impossible to receive only half of byte, no matter what. You may try to download any file from internet and interrupt as many times as you want, but you still cannot download only (for example) three bytes out of 8. But hey, who cares. HDD producers also gives you wrong values. 1kB is 1024 bytes, but for them it's 1000 bytes. It's nicer that way. And who cares about 24 bytes, right? Well, you may care when you buying new 4TB hdd and that difference becomes huge, because 4000000000 bytes divided by 1024, then by 1024 and then again by 1024 gives you 3,72 TB - and that is your "4 TB" drive (and may people thinking where they bytes gone). :)

Not true, communication has always been expressed in bits.

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Well, of course there is some real reason behind both - communication in bits and drives capacity as 1000 multiplier. But there is no REAL reason anymore to treat capacity of drive as 1000 multiplier, since ALL operating systems and computers (even from 8bit era) using binary system and kilobyte was always 1024 bytes, no matter what, even if this confuses some people who using "kilo" in more proper way - as 1000 multiplier (like kilowatts). I never seen filemanager that treats kilobyte as 1000 bytes.

 

And if we're talking about ISP companies, giving people speed in (g/m/k)bits per second instead of bytes, is confusing. All programs shows transfer in bytes per second (except some programs that people using only for measure intenet speed). I understand that years ago bits was more informative for technicians since transfer is not only useful bits (for user) but also additional ones, but hey - now not everyone are technicians and computer specialists. There should be some unification and kilobyte should be always treated as 1024 bytes and speed should be shown and measure as bytes per second - at least for wide market.

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