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Galvanic corrosion protection idea

Of course choosing compatible metals is the best way, but I think there will always be galvanic corrosion regardless.  At best you can only slow it down, never stop it entirely.

 

But perhaps there could be a way to control where it occurs.  I was wondering if you shoved a bunch of copper wool or mesh in a reservoir, upstream from the CPU block, could it act as a catalyst to capture the metallic ions before making its way to the CPU block?  Maybe the galvanic corrosion will occur on the copper wool in the reservoir before it starts to chew away at the block.

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I think you wouldnt even have to use copper, just something thats corroding before your block. 

 

Im not watercooling myself, but i really like the idea.

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12 minutes ago, xentropa said:

I was wondering if you shoved a bunch of copper wool or mesh in a reservoir, upstream from the CPU block, could it act as a catalyst to capture the metallic ions before making its way to the CPU block?  Maybe the galvanic corrosion will occur on the copper wool in the reservoir before it starts to chew away at the block.

Sounds like that would just make more mess and junk in the loop, getting clogged and stuck in the microfins, gotta remember with the pump running nothing fine is going to stay in one place anyway.

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I just use antifreeze in mixed metal loops.  preventing galvanic corrosion is one of the main reasons we use antifreeze after all.  of course, I don't leave mixed metal loops together long.  I just don't want to duct tape a good radiator to an a/c vent is all.

 

if you've got say a copper block and an aluminum rad then you can reduce the possibility of galvanic corrosion by electroplating the block with nickel as a base layer and then zinc as the show layer.  unfortunately nothing plates to aluminum and aluminum doesn't plate to anything so you can't get it perfect, but I've never seen galvanic corrosion between aluminum and zinc.  that will do the job until the electroplating wears off.  besides, zinc plating can have all kinds of pretty colors.  it's the perfect solution.

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14 hours ago, xentropa said:

Of course choosing compatible metals is the best way, but I think there will always be galvanic corrosion regardless.  At best you can only slow it down, never stop it entirely.

 

But perhaps there could be a way to control where it occurs.  I was wondering if you shoved a bunch of copper wool or mesh in a reservoir, upstream from the CPU block, could it act as a catalyst to capture the metallic ions before making its way to the CPU block?  Maybe the galvanic corrosion will occur on the copper wool in the reservoir before it starts to chew away at the block.

Galvanic corrosion only occurs if there are dis-similar metals, in a custom loops that use compatible materials like copper, brass, and nickel there is little worry of the galvanic effect like one would see from a mixed metal loop; aluminum and copper.

 

What you are suggesting is to use a sacrificial anode which can be used in certain applications given that the anode is more readily corroded than the base metal you are trying to protect. This is used readily on boats and other applications especially near salt water however because it's in a closed loop environment you risk ruining the loop when a sacrificial anode degrades usually forming an oxide of sorts which most likely can react with other elements in the loop or clog. 

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On 4/27/2020 at 10:45 AM, xentropa said:

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In terms of "capturing ions" chelating agents in coolants are your better bet since they don't clog and "are around everywhere all the time" thanks to it being pumped around. These are typically found as "anti-corrosive" agents in modern coolants.

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