Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Odd core-count CPUs

tikker
 Share

Another topic just now got me wondering: why are there no CPUs with odd core counts anymore? (Or so little that I do not know of). I know there were the Phenom X3s, for example. I can see why we don't actively produce these things. What made me think about this, is when a single core on a six core die breaks. Why not make it a 5 core CPU instead of a 4 core?

 

Are they laid out  and built in such a way that they communicate or are addressed in pairs? Or are they put "in series"? (i.e. one won't work without the other) I assume scalable software doesn't care whether it has 4 vs. 5, or 6 vs. 7 cores. Or is just one core breaking neatly a special case in its own way :P 

Crystal: CPU: i7 7700K | Motherboard: Asus ROG Strix Z270F | RAM: GSkill 16 GB@3200MHz | GPU: Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti FE | Case: Corsair Crystal 570X (black) | PSU: EVGA Supernova G2 1000W | Monitor: Asus VG248QE 24"

Laptop: Dell XPS 13 9370 | CPU: i5 10510U | RAM: 16 GB

Server: CPU: i5 4690k | RAM: 16 GB | Case: Corsair Graphite 760T White | Storage: 19 TB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

It would make sense to do this if you're struggling to have product to sell. But at the same time, if you have a significant amount of defects from your target product like this, you should probably figure out why there are so many defects and correct them. If you let this slide, then it'll rear it's ugly head later.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, handymanshandle said:

The Phenom and Athlon II X3s just happened because... it kinda worked.

Weird core count CPUs aren't necessary anymore, frankly.

Aww, no 3 core i3, 5 core i5?:( 

3 minutes ago, M.Yurizaki said:

It would make sense to do this if you're struggling to have product to sell. But at the same time, if you have a significant amount of defects from your target product like this, you should probably figure out why there are so many defects and correct them. If you let this slide, then it'll rear it's ugly head later.

Ah yeah reliability argument makes sense. You don't want a sort-of-broken thing out there.

 

I guess I can also imagine the marketing "nightmare" of Intel having actual 3, 5, and 7 core CPUs in their i3/5/7 lineup lol.

Crystal: CPU: i7 7700K | Motherboard: Asus ROG Strix Z270F | RAM: GSkill 16 GB@3200MHz | GPU: Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti FE | Case: Corsair Crystal 570X (black) | PSU: EVGA Supernova G2 1000W | Monitor: Asus VG248QE 24"

Laptop: Dell XPS 13 9370 | CPU: i5 10510U | RAM: 16 GB

Server: CPU: i5 4690k | RAM: 16 GB | Case: Corsair Graphite 760T White | Storage: 19 TB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as I am concerned those 3 cores AMD chips were simply quad-cores with a disabled core due to manufacturing issues.

Personal Desktop":

CPU: Intel Core i7 8700 @4.45ghz |~| Cooling: Cooler Master Hyper 212X |~| MOBO: Gigabyte Z370M D3H mATX|~| RAM: 16gb DDR4 3333mhzCL16 G.Skill Trident Z |~| GPU: nVidia Founders Edition GTX 1080 Ti |~| PSU: Corsair TX650M 80Plus Gold |~| Boot:  SSD WD Green M.2 2280 240GB |~| Storage: 1x3TB HDD 7200rpm Seagate Barracuda + SanDisk Ultra 3D 1TB |~| Case: Fractal Design Meshify C Mini |~| Display: Toshiba UL7A 4K/60hz |~| OS: Windows 10 Pro.

Luna, the temporary Desktop:

CPU: Intel Core i7 10700KF @ 5.0Ghz (5.1Ghz 4-core) |~| Cooling: bq! Dark Rock 4 Pro |~| MOBO: Gigabyte Z490 UD |~| RAM: 32G Kingston HyperX @ 2666Mhz CL13 |~| GPU: AMD Radeon RX 6800 (Reference) |~| PSU: Corsair HX1000 80+ Platinum |~| Windows Boot Drive: 2x 512GB (1TB total) Plextor SATA SSD (RAID0 volume) |~| Linux Boot Drive: 500GB Kingston A2000 |~| Storage: 4TB WD Black HDD |~| Case: Cooler Master Silencio S600 |~| Display 1 (leftmost): Eizo (unknown model) 1920x1080 IPS @ 60Hz|~| Display 2 (center): BenQ ZOWIE XL2540 1920x1080 TN @ 240Hz |~| Display 3 (rightmost): Wacom Cintiq Pro 24 3840x2160 IPS @ 60Hz 10-bit |~| OS: Windows 10 Pro (games / art) + Linux (distro: NixOS; programming and daily driver)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Princess Cadence said:

As far as I am concerned those 3 cores AMD chips were simply quad-cores with a disabled core due to manufacturing issues.

I mean isn't that basically why  almost all lower end chips are themselves? A large majority of lower end chips are just higher end chips with parts either cut off or disabled due to manufacturing issues.

5820k4Ghz/16GB(4x4)DDR4/MSI X99 SLI+/Corsair H105/R9 Fury X/Corsair RM1000i/128GB SM951/512GB 850Evo/1+2TB Seagate Barracudas

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Princess Cadence said:

As far as I am concerned those 3 cores AMD chips were simply quad-cores with a disabled core due to manufacturing issues.

 

7 hours ago, GloriousPain said:

I mean isn't that basically why  almost all lower end chips are themselves? A large majority of lower end chips are just higher end chips with parts either cut off or disabled due to manufacturing issues.

Yeah that's what I meant, surely there are chips with only  3 or 5 working cores? But then @M.Yurizaki makes a good point, if that happens so often you need to sell them as so, there's probably something to improve during production.

Crystal: CPU: i7 7700K | Motherboard: Asus ROG Strix Z270F | RAM: GSkill 16 GB@3200MHz | GPU: Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti FE | Case: Corsair Crystal 570X (black) | PSU: EVGA Supernova G2 1000W | Monitor: Asus VG248QE 24"

Laptop: Dell XPS 13 9370 | CPU: i5 10510U | RAM: 16 GB

Server: CPU: i5 4690k | RAM: 16 GB | Case: Corsair Graphite 760T White | Storage: 19 TB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, tikker said:

Yeah that's what I meant, surely there are chips with only  3 or 5 working cores? But then @M.Yurizaki makes a good point, if that happens so often you need to sell them as so, there's probably something to improve during production.

undoubtedly... and No Yurizaki doesn't really make a point in this instance. Because if that was the case there'd only be top end products because well the majority of lower end products are just that...

 

Like say with the "traditional" i-series setup...

 

i7; 4c-8t

 

i5; 4c-4t

 

i3; 2c-4t

 

Pentium; 2c-2t

 

I'ma just point out they're almost all originally supposed to be i7s, just most don't actually succeed; so intel lowers the price and tries to sell what would otherwise be waste... the thing with why they don't do say a 3c-3t i4 or a 3c-6t i6 is simply because it'd be hard to make appropriate price brackets and distinctions between product segments

5820k4Ghz/16GB(4x4)DDR4/MSI X99 SLI+/Corsair H105/R9 Fury X/Corsair RM1000i/128GB SM951/512GB 850Evo/1+2TB Seagate Barracudas

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share


×