Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
drih

Does taking and putting the CPU back into the motherboard affects TPM or data?

Recommended Posts

Posted · Original PosterOP

So I have my PC with
Core i3-8100F
2060
16GB

 

And as a part of Work From Home, we can take the office PC back home and it has
Core i7-8700
Quadro P400 (yes, P400)
16GB

 

Now, you've might guess it, I want to use the Core i7 in my PC because I think it would be better since I have better GPU and better cooling (not that it matter so much)
And if you ask why not put my 2060 to the office PC, because its case is small and the power supply is lower than mine. (the PC is OEM)

 

As the title has suggested, the office PC have TPM installed,

So, what would happen if I take the CPU out of the office pc's motherboard and use it on my pc's motherboard, and then for some time in the future when I have to return the pc, I put the CPU back into the office PC's motherboard?

 

  • Will it somehow disturb its integrity?
  • Or is it going to be fine because TPM's job is only to make sure nothing breaks the system integrity and secure the data?

 

I've only read a little about TPM (so CMIIW), in short, it's basically for securing data with software and hardware capabilities like encryption, and I kinda feel it bounds to every hardware installed when the TPM was present.

 

EDIT:
The whole Office PC is OEM (HP)

Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, drih said:

So I have my PC with
Core i3-8100F
2060
16GB

 

And as a part of Work From Home, we can take the office PC back home and it has
Core i7-8700
Quadro P400 (yes, P400)
16GB

 

Now, you've might guess it, I want to use the Core i7 in my PC because I think it would be better since I have better GPU and better cooling (not that it matter so much)
And if you ask why not put my 2060 to the office PC, because its case is small and the power supply is lower than mine. (the PC is OEM)

 

As the title has suggested, the office PC have TPM installed,

So, what would happen if I take the CPU out of the office pc's motherboard and use it on my pc's motherboard, and then for some time in the future when I have to return the pc, I put the CPU back into the office PC's motherboard?

 

  • Will it somehow disturb its integrity?
  • Or is it going to be fine because TPM's job is only to make sure nothing breaks the system integrity and secure the data?

 

I've only read a little about TPM (so CMIIW), in short, it's basically for securing data with software and hardware capabilities like encryption, and I kinda feel it bounds to every hardware installed when the TPM was present.

 

EDIT:
The whole Office PC is OEM (HP)

To my knowledge, that shouldn't affect the TPM I don't think since the TPM is its own little processor. Do you have the BitLocker recovery key just in case? 


AMD Phenom™ II X6 1100T @ 4.0GHz | MSI 890FXA-GD65 | MSI GTX 550Ti | 16GB Kingston DDR3 | Samsung 850 EVO 250GB | WD 750GB | Antec 300 | ASUS Xonar DG | Corsair A50 | OCZ 600W | Windows 10 Pro

Sony MDR-V250 | Logitech G610 Orion Brown | Logitech G402 | Samsung C27JG5 

Intel Core™ i5-8520U | WD Blue M.2 250GB | 1TB Seagate FireCuda | 8GB DDR4 | Windows 10 Home | ASUS Vivobook 15 

Intel Core™ i7-3520M | GT 630M | 16 GB Corsair Vengeance DDR3 | Samsung 850 EVO 250GB | macOS Catalina  Lenovo IdeaPad P580

AMD Phenom™ II X2 550 @ 3.10GHz | Gigabyte GA-MA785GM-US2H | XFX Radeon HD 4870 | 4GB Corsair XMS2 | WD 250GB | Thermaltake TR2 500W | Windows 10 Pro

iPhone 6s (iOS 13.6.1) | iPad Mini (iOS 9.3.5) | Samsung Galaxy S5e

Link to post
Share on other sites

As long as you don't boot the PC with TPM, it would be fine. 

 

If you do have to start the PC, I wouldn't take out the CPU... don't mess with it. Most likely the TPM module uses signatures / serial numbers from CPU and motherboard and maybe storage to produce some unique hashes/keys which are then used to do its job (unlock keys or whatever). 

Changing the cpu may cause the decryption to fail because the cpu has a different "signature" / "serial number" 

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have a physical TPM module installed then nothing else matters. All cryptographic info is tied to the module itself.

If it's firmware/software TPM, ensure you have the BitLocker recovery key or turn it off before changing anything.


-アパゾ

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted · Original PosterOP
2 hours ago, BlueChinchillaEatingDorito said:

To my knowledge, that shouldn't affect the TPM I don't think since the TPM is its own little processor. Do you have the BitLocker recovery key just in case? 

As far as I know we don't enable the BitLocker.

 

That's good to know.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted · Original PosterOP
1 hour ago, mariushm said:

As long as you don't boot the PC with TPM, it would be fine. 

 

If you do have to start the PC, I wouldn't take out the CPU... don't mess with it. Most likely the TPM module uses signatures / serial numbers from CPU and motherboard and maybe storage to produce some unique hashes/keys which are then used to do its job (unlock keys or whatever). 

Changing the cpu may cause the decryption to fail because the cpu has a different "signature" / "serial number" 

What if I only use the CPU and then put it back (the office PC won't be turned on until I put the original CPU back in)?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted · Original PosterOP
1 hour ago, APasz said:

If you have a physical TPM module installed then nothing else matters. All cryptographic info is tied to the module itself.

If it's firmware/software TPM, ensure you have the BitLocker recovery key or turn it off before changing anything.

The PC has Physical TPM and as far as I know we don't enable the BitLocker, for Firmware/Software based TPM though, I'm not entirely sure, but since it's OEM it probably have one.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Since you have a physical TPModule. You can do basically whatever you want.

Just don't reset the BIOS or anything like that, it's a real pain the arse otherwise.


-アパゾ

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Newegg

×