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Egad

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  1. Agree
    Egad reacted to aliceawonderland in Intel and AMD don’t want you to know this… (but your old computer is still fine)   
    Have to admit I was quite disappointed with this video. It seemed rush despite there being a 2-month jump in the middle.
    The metrics before upgrading anything showed that the CPU is actually not close to modern-day hardware even compared to two-three generations back even though that was one of the main points Anthony was taunting at the beginning of the video. Including Anthony's thought on how navigating through the server's directories seemed snappy after the poor benchmark results was really odd as--as Anthony said, "I mean browsing directories isn't a big thing, but, you do it a lot".
    Loading up a 1080p video from YouTube on a $1000+ PC from a few years back is also something most people would expect to run just fine.
    I thought it would get better once Anthony started getting into the hardware but seeing him complain about the small number of usb ports - 6 on the io of the motherboard - then have him pull out a PCIe expansion card which has just one USB A port and another USB C port seemed like a poor recommendation, to be fair, Anthony mentions the existence of others which can provide more. Anthony also puts in a 2.5 GbE controller but then just a few seconds later, after the time jump, mentions it might not be helpful for you and it isn't even providing any benefit for the desktop they have either.
    Anthony proceeds to check the WiFi speeds which are incredibly slow compared to Ethernet then simply states, 
    "it's not quite the upgrade we were hoping for" which Anthony states after testing the WiFi adapterseems to sum up most of this video quite well.
     
    We aren't told what exactly Anthony did to fix the ram issues, did he simply put the old 8GB stick back in? It's unclear as all we're told is that its running 1600 mHz memory once again. Stating the games are running good while two crashes had just occurred also doesn't seem like the best description.
     
    Overall, the number of issues that cropped up in this video makes it seem more like Linus troubleshooting the Six 8k Workstations one CPU vs a informative video.
  2. Agree
    Egad reacted to Ninbura in I’ve been water cooling wrong for YEARS - $H!T Manufacturers Say   
    Having a hard time understanding the true purpose of this video.

    Corsair reached out saying that directly stacking radiators results in "negligible to no improvement" and then LTT proceeded to test a completely normal radiator setup in which there is plenty of space / free flowing air in-between radiators. At the end of video, Linus mentions they ended up actually testing the scenario in question off camera by removing one of the stacked radiators in the Minecraft server to find that temperatures increased by 5c, which I'd think would considered a "negligible" difference when taking in account that said radiator was 60 millimeters thick with a 320 millimeter foot print.

    There is an obvious bottleneck there when stacking those radiators directly which resulted in very little improvement, would be cool to see a video actually testing the scenario in question.
  3. Like
    Egad got a reaction from ShrimpBrime in Optiplex 9020 RAM Strangeness   
    If you pop out the RAM that came with the Optiplex and put your new RAM into those slots, can you get the computer to boot on just the new RAM?
  4. Like
    Egad got a reaction from Zberg in Can AMD Beat the ULTIMATE Intel Gaming PC?   
    Obviously true baller is dual Titans, but looking over the GamerNexus results I'd go 2x 2080Ti over 1x Titan:
     
    https://www.gamersnexus.net/guides/3419-sli-nvlink-titan-rtx-benchmark-gaming-power-consumption
     
    The difference between a single 2080TI and RTX Titan isn't major, but you get get big gains from multiple GPU when the game actually implements it.  It comes down to if you want 5 to 10 more fps during most games, or want to gamble big on getting 70+ fps uplifts on DX12 titles that do multiple GPU well.  
     
    Plus more and more titles are shipping with at the very least the ability to unload the async compute work onto a second GPU, since DX12/Vulkan make that easy and you can do it even if there isn't a high speed interconnect between the GPUs.  It's just taken time for engine makers to bake that into their engines as easily available tooling.
     
     
  5. Like
    Egad got a reaction from TechyBen in Can AMD Beat the ULTIMATE Intel Gaming PC?   
    Not surprised to be honestly.  The higher frequency on the Intel chips still gives them an edge.  Even with  AMD holding the IPC edge on most workloads, it only becomes relevant if the Intel chip needs two ticks of its clock to do the work.  Not many games put that much load on the CPU, both chips generally get the frame done in the same tick.  Had they thrown some Total War with massive armies on there or some late game clicking the End Turn button in Civ you might see some better results for AMD since the AI leaning on the CPU might force Intel to tick twice, but that's all just speculation.  
     
    I have an AMD system and will fully admit I bought on the grounds I'm not yet moving to a high refresh rate monitor since frankly I want to see the OLED market mature a bit more.  I figure either I can toss a higher frequency Ryzen 4000 in there and resell my 3900X or just make the 3900X box my new home server and go with an Intel #-KS chip.  For anyone pulling the trigger on a monitor though and who has the budget, go with a KS.  
     
    The weird thing to me are the Seagate drives.  People who are building at this level, but don't have a NAS are weird.  I guess you gotta use those surplus drives so you don't mail them back though.
  6. Informative
    Egad got a reaction from j1philli in Wiring Home Network   
    I did CAT 6A from my router to:
     
    1. My main desktop rig's location
    2. The location of my NAS (2x to it)
    3. The media PC that plays back on my projector
    4. A spot I might someday use as my office (meaning my main desktop would now be there)
     
    My logic was that a 4K Bluray with 7.1 surround sound streams at 100 mbps, the best I've ever gotten off Steam is ~400 mbps (I have a 2 gig fiber drop for the house and live 25 miles from the Steam server for my region) so saturating a 1 gig connection to one device takes some serious effort.  Really the only things that saturate my network are direct file copies and when I'm using the feature of letting one Windows box share its updates with others on the LAN (and that happens at 4 am, so meh).
     
    My theory is that someday when I'm rocking an 8K projector or something I might be happy I have 10 gig between my NAS and media PC, but honestly I question if even that would saturate 1 gig.  So I'm fine with sticking lots of Cat6 in the walls, and like W-L says, do lots of drops.  It's more about support a bunch of devices each wanting say 200 mbps than one device wanting 10 gig.  
     
    I'd also add on, think about where you want wifi spots and home automation. 
     
    With regard to wifi, I wired up all my closets on the grounds I might someday hide a wifi access point in there or a mITX build or something.  That way all my access points do wired backhaul for sending data back to the router.  I operate on the assumption someday we might have a faster wifi that has an even shorter range, so I hit all the bedroom closets, the garage, the coat closet on the first floor, etc.  I came in just about the top shelf in each situation so in theory I can just toss the wifi device up there and feed it via power over ethernet and I don't need to have it actually in my bedroom with its lights blinking away all night.  I also have a drop up in my attic so that I can snake a cable out of a roof vent and I have a pair of access points on my roof, one for the front yard and one for the backayard.  It's much easier to have coverage in your yard when you don't need to punch through an exterior wall to get the signal there.  I thought about doing a drop on my back deck, but I was concerned over the ease of physical access to it.  So I figured Wifi 6 is good enough.  
     
    With regard to home automation, doing power over ethernet vs having the device on wifi and a battery you need to change/recharge is much nicer.  
     
  7. Like
    Egad got a reaction from steelo in First PS4 PC   
    You have some interesting claims, I'd love to clarify.  Also I feel kind of badm like I'm triggering some kind of compulsion loop here or something.
     


     
    First you are claiming that a GT 1030 beats any Polaris 11 GPU arch?  So we take a computer, plug in a GT 1030, and runs some benchmarks, then remove the GT 1030, plug in the RX470, and run the benchmarks again.  You are stating that the GT 1030 benchmarks will exceed the RX470 benchmarks.
     
    Because that's frankly total garbage.  The RX470 was typically recommend over the GTX 1050Ti given its performance edge.  The GTX 1050Ti and GT 1030 are both Pascal cards and the GTX 1050Ti was two increments ahead of the GT 1030 in nVidia's lineup, you're arguing the sky isn't blue at this point.
     


     
    PS4 shipped with a HD7870 that had two units disabled due to power and cooling concerns.
    PS4 Pro shipped with a downclocked RX 480, which is Polaris 11.  So when comparing GPU abilities, to call it comparable to the PS4 Pro, it needs to slide in between the RX470 and RX480, the two Polaris 11 cards.
     
    Sure some other things were done to glue them onto the overall Neo and Livermore chips, but that's what the graphic components were.
     
    There is a bunch of other stuff going on here.  At some level you seem to want to claim whatever lets you win the argument.  Like your comments about Microsoft Office to me all of a sudden and your comments about emulation to steelo.  First I'd point you back at the fact I agree that a Haswell + GT 1030 is better for CPU heavy tasks.  However people are responding to your claims the GT 1030 is superior graphically.  There is no situation when playing a 3D gaming title that the GT 1030 trumps any Polaris 11 part, be it the RX470, the RX480, or the Polaris 11 part in the Pro.
     
    Second as for emulation, Pascal doesn't have a true hardware scheduler for async compute which hurts it with regard to running Vulkan and DX12 titles.  See for example Maxwell and Pascal cards poor showing in the recently Doom Eternal benchmarks.  At the end of the day when the PS4 emulator does mature, you're going to be trying to play PS4 games on something that lacks hardware level async (and 99.99% chance the emulator is going to be written to use Vulkan), has a GPU that only enjoys a slight edge over the PS4's cut down HD 7870 and is outclassed by the downclocked in the PS4 Pro, and won't be emulating anything.  Since the rule is you need to bring significantly more computing to the table than the console had so as to deal with the emulation overhead.  Even if all the instruction sets line up, you're still running the PlayStation OS on top of Windows or Linux to come degree.
     
    If it's your hobby cool, all my builds are hobbiest and don't make perfect sense.  But misleading claims about the capabilities of a machine you've stated you want to try to sell others is not cool.
     
     
     
     
  8. Agree
    Egad got a reaction from steelo in First PS4 PC   
    Your hobbies are your hobbies man and follow your bliss.  But making claims that a GT 1030 beats a Polaris 11 based part is just plain wrong.  A GT1030 doesn't even beat a Polaris 10 (the RX460) in Firestrike and other graphical benchmarks.  T
     
    While I would agree a Haswell + (pretty much any GPU that can survive on just 75w of PCIe power) is a better option for games known to be heavy on the CPU relative to their GPU load (Source engine titles, certain eSports titles, grand strategy games, etc), it's a much less well rounded gaming setup than just a straight PS4 Pro. 
  9. Agree
    Egad reacted to LAwLz in Once labelled Gaming addiction as mental disorder, WHO now recommends playing games amid coronavirus outbreak   
    What a dishonest and clickbait headline.
    What the WHO is saying is, stay at home if you can and keep calm. Maybe play some video games or read a book.
    But don't spend copious amounts of time playing games to the point where it gets in the way of more important things.
     
     
    If you don't understand the difference between "play some game for fun" and "I play games to the point where it's harmful behavior" then you might actually have a problem. WHO is saying the former is good, but the latter is bad. It shouldn't be a hard concept to grasp.
     
     
     
    Also, the advice given during a pandemic is not the same as the advice given out during "normal days". Staying at home 24/7 is not typically recommended either, but it is during a pandemic. So there is nothing hypocritical about giving different advice at different times and situations.
     
     
     
    "Hurr durr WHO says I should eat food but when I eat 5 chocolate cakes and 2 family sized pizzas for breakfast during a famine they all of a sudden say I shouldn't do it. What a bunch of hypocrites!".
  10. Agree
    Egad reacted to Sithon in Pewdiepie! - We built you a gaming PC!   
    If you associate with someone you're also associating with their content, the public perception, etc. If LMG did a video building a PC for Trump (Or Biden/Sanders) you couldn't claim that they aren't associating with politics at all just because they don't specifically engage in political discussion, since their actions were associating with inherently political figures. It's the same with other content creators.
  11. Agree
    Egad reacted to AtomicFire in Pewdiepie! - We built you a gaming PC!   
    This is honestly a real bad look for LMG
  12. Agree
    Egad reacted to AtomicFire in Pewdiepie! - We built you a gaming PC!   
    Literally about a month ago
    https://www.ccn.com/pewdiepie-laughs-at-coronavirus-in-racially-edgy-return-video/
     
    And don't forget all the other times he was racist/antisemetic
  13. Informative
    Egad got a reaction from KnowledgeByTech in Where should I mount GPU's 120mm Rad & Fan?   
    I do rear exhaust.  Top mount also works.  The primary benefit of the hybrid cards is the ability to dump the heat outside the case.  Given you have a 280mm AIO for the I'd go rear, because I assume your top AIO is also exhaust, so that's three fans all exhausting in the top rear of the case.  At that point your only concern is dust if the case the case ends up negative pressure, depending on the air those three fans move vs whatever you have on intake duty.  For exhaust the only concern is that you're not pumping the hot air off your CPU tower cooler through the radiator, and since that's all going out the AIO, the only heat you're getting is off the VRMs.
     
    Front mount isn't terrible unless you have a really small case with poor airflow.  In most setups even if you have the radiator on intake, it's not going to heat up the case any significant amount.  The only time I'd really get worked up over the hybrid on intake would be a super compact case where you have to go with a low profile like a NH-L9a or such and then mount the radiator literally right next to it, so you're blowing your GPU's hot air right onto a CPU cooler that is already fighting for its life.  When I had two 980Ti hybrids in SLI in a midtower, all the gain was purely in moving the heat away from the immediate vicinity of the cards.  Both rads exhausting out the top or intake on the front showed no difference.
     
     
  14. Like
    Egad got a reaction from James N. in CPU cooling!   
    I'd lean toward 280mm.  You can estimate about 9% less surface area on the 280mm than the 360mm assuming all else equal, but you can get fatter 280s.  A fatter 280mm with good fin density has one less moving part, fits in more cases (unless you have one of the rare cases that just doesn't do 140mm fans period), and it's generally easier to work with.  Also consider the general rule that the bigger the fan the better the performance at the same RPM.  So a pair of 140mm static pressure fans generally gives better results than three 120mm static pressure fans when tuning for noise. 
     
     
  15. Like
    Egad got a reaction from menya in First build plan, what you all think?   
    I honestly wouldn't buy any extra fans from a need perspective.  Your PSU is segregated in that case and you're only running a 2600X and 590.  If you start to see the 590 throttle even with its fan curve up, you can at that time decide to buy a front fan to blow onto it.  Right off the bat, if you want them for looks sure.  
     
    From the perspective of performance and acoustics though, honestly buying cheap fans now doesn't seem to offer much.   In a scenario where even with max fan curves on the 590 and the rear exhaust fan (or you can pop the top vent on the case, move the fan to be intake on the front and try a push config with two unobstructed rear vents) leads to thermal throttles and stuttering on the 590 you can get a cheap fan for intake.  For scenarios where the max fan curves yield good performance but unpleasant noise levels, honestly the best long term solution is to deal with the noise until you can afford to get some good fans that move lots of air at low RPMs, bunch of cheaper fans at medium speeds probably still means noise.
     
    Also unless you're in a metered internet setup or just have really poor speeds so you can't afford to be redownloading games, I'd agree with @dizmo and go for one higher capacity SSD.  Especially given expected NAND price spikes in 2020.  Assuming you're not in an internet limited situation, go for a setup with just a 1 TB SSD now and in the future you can consider getting a lower RPM mech drive to move music, photos, video etc on to once your SSD fills up.  
  16. Agree
    Egad got a reaction from dizmo in First build plan, what you all think?   
    I honestly wouldn't buy any extra fans from a need perspective.  Your PSU is segregated in that case and you're only running a 2600X and 590.  If you start to see the 590 throttle even with its fan curve up, you can at that time decide to buy a front fan to blow onto it.  Right off the bat, if you want them for looks sure.  
     
    From the perspective of performance and acoustics though, honestly buying cheap fans now doesn't seem to offer much.   In a scenario where even with max fan curves on the 590 and the rear exhaust fan (or you can pop the top vent on the case, move the fan to be intake on the front and try a push config with two unobstructed rear vents) leads to thermal throttles and stuttering on the 590 you can get a cheap fan for intake.  For scenarios where the max fan curves yield good performance but unpleasant noise levels, honestly the best long term solution is to deal with the noise until you can afford to get some good fans that move lots of air at low RPMs, bunch of cheaper fans at medium speeds probably still means noise.
     
    Also unless you're in a metered internet setup or just have really poor speeds so you can't afford to be redownloading games, I'd agree with @dizmo and go for one higher capacity SSD.  Especially given expected NAND price spikes in 2020.  Assuming you're not in an internet limited situation, go for a setup with just a 1 TB SSD now and in the future you can consider getting a lower RPM mech drive to move music, photos, video etc on to once your SSD fills up.  
  17. Agree
    Egad got a reaction from m0oble in First build plan, what you all think?   
    I think the Wraith Spire that comes in the box with that R5 2600X looks like a better cooler than the older flower design Aerocool.  That Aerocool isn't going to net you any performance and may actually hurt you.
     
    If you drop the CPU Cooler and those Case Fans (I'm assuming you're buying the Thermaltake case new so it comes with some fans), what does that do with regard to letting you either put more money into the CPU or more capacity on the SSD?  Both of those are quality of life improvements you'll see more value out and frankly if you're unhappy with the noise of the Thermaltake fans, you can always swap them out in six months.
     
    Also what's up with your RAM exactly.  16 GB of Kingston HyperX Fury is plenty, you don't need to go buy additional Apacer RAM.  
  18. Informative
    Egad got a reaction from SgtBot in Python File Sorter Help   
    Use os.rename or shutil.move to actually move the file.  Those commands will handle white space escaping for you.
     
    You might also find filename, file_extension = os.path.splitext a useful command.  Because splitting on period is going to fail on "my.file.has.periods.docx"
  19. Funny
    Egad got a reaction from TechyBen in NCIX Bankruptcy Auction - Day 2   
    I'm just sad because LTT missed a great chance for a mini scrap wars.  Linus and Luke each get some cash and don't need to hide who they are.  However you have to source everything in the parking lot as people load their cars up after the auction.  
  20. Funny
    Egad got a reaction from Canada EH in NCIX Bankruptcy Auction - Day 2   
    I'm just sad because LTT missed a great chance for a mini scrap wars.  Linus and Luke each get some cash and don't need to hide who they are.  However you have to source everything in the parking lot as people load their cars up after the auction.  
  21. Funny
    Egad got a reaction from Egg-Roll in Black Friday Shopping Guide – Newegg.com DEALS!   
    Best Buy, at least in America, will often do deals on Western Digital 8 TB external drives.  If you shuck the drive out of the enclosure you end up with a WD Red.  I've been slowly filling up my NAS that way.  Definitely going to check Best Buy on Black Friday/Cyber Monday.
     
     
  22. Like
    Egad got a reaction from Kitsune Aoi in Black Friday Shopping Guide – Newegg.com DEALS!   
    Best Buy, at least in America, will often do deals on Western Digital 8 TB external drives.  If you shuck the drive out of the enclosure you end up with a WD Red.  I've been slowly filling up my NAS that way.  Definitely going to check Best Buy on Black Friday/Cyber Monday.
     
     
  23. Like
    Egad got a reaction from Damascus in Thermal Paste and Fan Upgrade Improvements   
    I wanted to share my results with doing some rig maintenance in hopes that it may be of values to others now or in some nebulous future when some is searching around.  
     
    When I first built my rig I was admittedly pretty lazy, just used the various stock fans, manufacturer paste applications, etc.  Setup was:
     
    Case: Noctis 450 Front Intake Fans: 3x120mm of whatever NZXT fans came with case Rear Exhaust: 1x140mm whatever NZXT fan came with the case CPU Cooler/Top Exhaust:  H110i GTX (280mm AIO) with stock Corsair static pressure fans/pre applied Corsair paste cooling a 5960X OCed to Core: 4.5 GHz (1.282 volts), Cache: 4.25 GHz (1.24 volts) GPUs: 2x EVGA 980Ti with ACX 2.0 coolers running at EVGA provided speeds  
    Long story short nothing thermal throttled, although in games that did thread the Corsair fans started to sound like my computer was taxiing for takeoff.  Since I wear over the ear headphones will gaming though, meh.
     
    However as time when on I found more of an urge to OC the 980Tis beyond what EVGA had done and I found once I had them up to 1511 MHz on the Core and 3954 MHz on the memory, I'd hit 85 C much faster than I wanted to do.  Since I kind of had the urge to tinker I decided to get new fans and repaste everything, but to do so incrementally and do a bit of measurement.  I used GTA V for everything because it and Witcher 3 are the most demanding games I play and Witcher 3 did ship with a benchmark.  My third most demanding game would be Borderlands 2 and yeah I was doing just find there before the overclocking.  A note I built the computer in August of 2016 so the paste was ~26 months old.  
     
    One other item of note:
     
    When running GTA V I'd have EVGA Precision, Intel XTU, CPU-Z and Task Manager open on the second monitor.  Prior to the memory OC of the'd see 8.4 to 8.6 GB of system RAM be used, varied from bench to bench).  After the OC, with the same drivers, I'd see 12.4 to 12.7 GB of RAM used during the bench.  Given nothing else on the system had changed I found that interesting, perhaps the faster GPU was keeping the system cpu/memory controller busier so it didn't have as much time to garbage collect.  
     
    Round 0
    Ambient Temp: 20C
    5960X Stable Temp running Intel XTU Stress Test and Furmark running (100% load on all 16 logical processors): 88C  980Ti results:  Rapidly throttle down to 1488 MHz and hit 85 C midway through the fighter flight part of the GTA V benchmark   Subjective Notes:  Furmark + XTU Stress was load, even through over the ear good quality headphones, you could really feel the warm air coming out of the top of the case  
    Round 1, Replacing Thermal Paste
    I repasted both of the 980Tis and the CPU with Arctic Silver MX-4.
    Ambient Temp: 20C
    5960X Stable Temp with XTU Stress Test and Furmark: 84C 980Ti results: Never went above 78C, GUP clock stayed above 1500 MHz Subjective Notes:  Still pretty loud, while I probably could have messed with the GPU fan curves a bit, the Corsair fans are the main noise culprit and thus it's not really worth it Practical Notes: 980Ti SLI means GTA V at 4K ultra settings posts a min fps of 58.3 for the benchmark and an average FPS of 78 Or in summary, I paid 5.99 for the MX-4, plus the cost of some rubbing alcohol and wipes to drop 7C off my GPU temps.  I'm glad I did this over spending on some kind of conversion kit to let me mount AIOs onto my GPUs.
     
    Round 2, New Fans
    Front Fans: 3x120 Notcua NF-S12 PWM (120mm airflow fans) Rear Exhaust: 1x Noctau NF-A14 PWM Chromax  (140 static pressure) Top Exhaust/AOI: 1x NF-A14 Industrial, 1x NF A-14 Chromax (140 static pressure) Note: Two different A-14s ordered, to get some brown anti vibration pads
     
    Ambient Temp: 23.33C (my wife came home and demanded to know why the thermostat was set so low)
    5960X Stable Temp with XTU Stress Test and Furmark: 85C 980Ti results: Never went above 78C, GPU clock stayed above 1500 MHz, over repeated runs I was able to get stable at 1522 MHz GPU clock at 78C Subjective Notes:  Much quieter at load.  Significantly more air seems to exhaust out the back, whereas originally it was pretty hot air coming out the top and more or less room temp air coming out the back, now I feel warm air coming out the rear exhaust and roughly the same temp air coming out the top.  No noticeable temp difference.   Practical Notes: Considering the ambient temp bump up, the new fans did contributed to temps, although their main contribution was with regard to noise.  It seems the NZXT and Corsair fans were moving air, they just liked announcing to everyone on the first floor how hard they were working.  The biggest wins are the removal of those Corsair fans and the fact my GPU fans aren't cycling as hard since the GPU fans are now the nosiest in the build.  
    Bonus Round
    Round 2, but with only the middle front intake fan on (the one blowing on the GPUs)
    Ambient Temp: 23.33C
     
    5960X Stable Temp with XTU Stress Test and Furmark: 85C 980Ti results: Never went above 79C, GUP clock stayed above 1500 MHz Notes: This more or less replicates Luke's work that one intake in the front is typically enough.  I would note though though that my GPU fans were working harder when I watched the fan speed reports on Precision during the test and the noise increase was noticeable.    
    Final Thoughts:
     
    Replace manufacture thermal paste, especially old stuff.  I want to credit EVGA for having a decent application on both 980Tis (especially compared to some OEM jobs I've seen where it looks like a sex crazed maniac ejaculated thermal paste all over the card), so it was either quality or age that was playing the largest role in the temps.

    (Paste as applied by EVGA)
     
    The results on the fans are nice, but not worth tying up significant money in unless your case fans are much worse or much louder than mine.  I'm happy with the result and scratched my itch to open up the case and tinker with my case.  Although I probably could have gone with just one front 140mm fan.  The third 120mm fan is pretty much a waste since it's so low down all it does is blow air over the ugly nest of cables in my case's basement.  The midlevel fan pretty much aims directly at both GPUs and is doing the lions share of the work for cooling them.  
     
    Hopefully this helps some other folks, now back to looking at full loop hard tube cooling and telling myself "No, you don't need that."
     
     
     
  24. Agree
    Egad got a reaction from JaegerB in Is It a Good Decision?   
    On RAM, I'm a bit curious if you mean defective as in the DIMM simply doesn't work or defective in the sense it doesn't run when you load a desired XMP profile or try to manually OC.  If it's the latter, unless you have really bad frequencies or are getting a sweet deal, investing in DDR3 seems like a poor use of money.
     
    A 1060 is fine, but ultimately you simply cannot force any kind of common load percentage onto your components, nor should you.  Let the game lean on hardware as it desires.  Some games are more CPU intensive with AI, pathfinding, etc.  Most games are more GPU intensive and having those titles utilize the GPU at 95+% is fine/desirable.  Settings should only be adjusted with regard to maintaining a desired framerate.
     
    A SSD can be useful with helping with popin in open world games, boot times, load times, etc but isn't going to impact the frame rate as directly.  
     
      
  25. Like
    Egad got a reaction from Jerakl in FBI's Advice on Ransomware? Just Pay The Ransom!   
    I like the righteous indignation in here on paying them.  Ransomware makes its money going after the little folks who have a little local server and just enough revenue they can pay but not enough they can afford a full time IT department.  Normally at most they have a part time guy on contract.
     
    A full time IT guy of decent standing is probably 30 to 50 thousand per year depending on what part of America you're in, plus benefits.  Ransomware wants 500 to 5000 bucks typically.  The business logic is pretty clear for many small businesses.  Save on the IT guy for years, make a on time payment of at most 10 grand to get your data back, and then pay someone 150k to redo your office network.  Assuming you only get hit by ransomware once ever 5 years, hey it's not that bad.  It's quite disturbing logic from an IT professional standpoint, but honestly for many companies that aren't tech centric, it's probably not as stupid as it sounds.  
     
    Frankly even with our disconnected backups if we somehow got hit, we might pay simply because you can only wipe and cycle them back in to service so cycle.  If the local file server goes down we'd be looking at:
     
    Assume everything in the office is compromised and wipe all machines.  Possibly replacing all drives in the process due to fear of the virus having carved out a little hidden partition that can survive reformats (which is a thing).  That's a couple days even with techs, programmers, and everyone else with basic technical competency working on it. Send a tech to our offsite and disconnected back location to copy the data we need right away off the tapes and onto spinning disk.   Also undergo efforts to ensure credit card info, social security numbers, etc were all properly encrypted and couldn't have been compromised.   Point 3 is probably a big reason we'd pay.  If they had our file server locked down, we'd pay to decrypt it just to see what exactly the hackers managed to get, then unplug it from everything and have a security expert scan it for anything we need to let our customers know about.  Plus with points 1 and 2, for some of the rush jobs we'd probably have to print things off and manually reenter them into clean systems, because moving 400 TB of data from tape drives in Utah to the office California is going to take some time.  Even just sending out a tech with a bunch of external disks in his trunk is a two day turn around.  
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