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GPU Overheating

Ferg
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Hey guys,

 

For the last year i have been having serious problems with my graphics card (asus r9 390x) overheating. I know it is a hot normally but my pc currently idles at about 50 degrees C and will play games at 95 or just crash. I've stopped playing games for the sake of the card but even videos can take it up to that region. I decided to install further fans and i now have 7 (5 intake, 2 outake). However, this has still not helped. My next step would be to replace the thermal paste on the card but it sounds like a difficult procedure. Attaching a custom cooler might work but would be expensive and i just spent lots on case fans. What do you guys think should be my next step?

 

Thanks in advance,

 

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1 minute ago, Ferg said:

Hey guys,

 

For the last year i have been having serious problems with my graphics card (asus r9 390x) overheating. I know it is a hot normally but my pc currently idles at about 50 degrees C and will play games at 95 or just crash. I've stopped playing games for the sake of the card but even videos can take it up to that region. I decided to install further fans and i now have 7 (5 intake, 2 outake). However, this has still not helped. My next step would be to replace the thermal paste on the card but it sounds like a difficult procedure. Attaching a custom cooler might work but would be expensive and i just spent lots on case fans. What do you guys think should be my next step?

 

Thanks in advance,

 

Get more exhaust fans or just take out a few inlet. The objective is not MAXIMUM AIRFLOW, the objective is balancing intake and exhaust. Other than that, replace the thermal paste like you mentioned or get a custom cooler.

import shittyTechAdvice as RollTime

 

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5 minutes ago, RollTime said:

Get more exhaust fans or just take out a few inlet. The objective is not MAXIMUM AIRFLOW, the objective is balancing intake and exhaust. Other than that, replace the thermal paste like you mentioned or get a custom cooler.

I get what you are saying but I use a mixture of static pressure and airflow fans to get a positive airflow within the case. My point was more that adding them has not made a shred of difference and so I do not believe airflow to be the problem.

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ok , adding case fans was never going to solve the problem

either max out the fan curve or replace the thermal paste. otherwise yeah the case having more airflow or the "case pressure" crap scapegoat people try to use is not going to do anything.

 

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+1 on replacing the thermal paste. But also the mistake was choosing asus for an r9 card. Asus is great but they design their coolers for Nvidia cards so they tend to do much worse on r9 cards. My r9 285 strix usually sat around 85-90 and got loud. So another couple of suggestions that are going to cost more money are: grab an all in one liquid cooler and zip tie it to the gpu or using nzxt's g12, get something like an arctic accelero extreme heat sink, or the most expensive option of getting a custom water block and delving into custom cooler.

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Same issue with my MSI 390. Put some Mx-4 on it & temps dropped to 82°c tops under load. 

I also cut an extra side panel fan-hole in my case, blowing directly in it & that has also helped. 

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