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Fan configuration help

fraeport
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Hi! 

 

I'm very new to building and was looking to add some more fans to the setup because my case airflow isn't the best. My computer was not built by me, and from what I can tell in the case manual/from measuring I am not sure I would be able to move my AIO to the top of the case as someone else recommended to me. I was instead just wondering if I were to put 3 120mm fans at the top, should they be intake or exhaust? Here's the current configuration: https://imgur.com/a/45TAPfO

 

Any input would be very welcome, thanks so much if you read this! 

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1 hour ago, fraeport said:

Hi! 

 

I'm very new to building and was looking to add some more fans to the setup because my case airflow isn't the best. My computer was not built by me, and from what I can tell in the case manual/from measuring I am not sure I would be able to move my AIO to the top of the case as someone else recommended to me. I was instead just wondering if I were to put 3 120mm fans at the top, should they be intake or exhaust? Here's the current configuration: https://imgur.com/a/45TAPfO

 

Any input would be very welcome, thanks so much if you read this! 

I would avoid installing the radiator behind the case intake fans as it means that the air going back over the rest of your system will be warmer. From the picture, it looks like you should be able to mount the cpu rad on top with the tubes towards the front. I would recommend flipping how you mount your cooler so that your tubes emerge to the front instead of the back if possible to reduce bending. If your exhaust fan and intake fans are good enough, rising heat should be pulled out the back to avoid too much hot internal air going over the cpu rad.

Current PC:

  • CPU
    Intel i9-12900KS
  • Motherboard
    Asus Rog Maximus Z690 Hero
  • RAM
    G.Skill Trident Z5 DDR5-6400; 2 x (16GB x 2); CL32-39-39-102; 1.40 V
  • GPU
    Aorus Xtreme Waterforce RTX 3090 TI
  • Case
    Corsair 7000D Airflow
  • Storage
    2 x 2TB WD Black sn850 SSDs
  • PSU
    EVGA Supernova 1600W P2, Fully Modular
  • Display(s)
    34" 1900R Alienware AW3418DW Black, 32" Samsung Odyssey G7 240Hz
  • Cooling
    Arctic Liquid Freezer ii 420, Built in 360mm gpu rad, 7 x 140mm Noctua NF-A14's (4 used as full case fan set, 3 used to upgrade CPU rad fans), 4 x 120mm Noctua NF-F12's (3 used to upgrade GPU rad stock fans, 1 used to fill last remaining case fan slot)
  • Keyboard
    Fidio Mechanical Gaming Keyboard
  • Mouse
    Asus Rog Spatha X
  • Sound
    SteelSeries Arctis Pro + Game DAC Wired Headset
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
  • PCPartPicker URL

 

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2 hours ago, cleric_warlock said:

I would avoid installing the radiator behind the case intake fans as it means that the air going back over the rest of your system will be warmer. From the picture, it looks like you should be able to mount the cpu rad on top with the tubes towards the front. I would recommend flipping how you mount your cooler so that your tubes emerge to the front instead of the back if possible to reduce bending. If your exhaust fan and intake fans are good enough, rising heat should be pulled out the back to avoid too much hot internal air going over the cpu rad.

Hey, thanks for responding! 🙂 That definitely makes sense and I'm going to open it up again on the weekend and try this. My only concern is that I think the rad + fans might be too thick and might cover where the CPU power cable goes through the case. There's no other spot nearby I can run it through. I won't be sure until I have it open and can measure properly but just in case I can't, what would be the recommended next step? If the rad fans as they are are currently set to intake, would that mean the top fans should be exhaust?

 

(Sorry if these are silly questions/if I named parts incorrectly, this is still pretty confusing to me!) Thanks again for reading! 

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41 minutes ago, fraeport said:

Hey, thanks for responding! 🙂 That definitely makes sense and I'm going to open it up again on the weekend and try this. My only concern is that I think the rad + fans might be too thick and might cover where the CPU power cable goes through the case. There's no other spot nearby I can run it through. I won't be sure until I have it open and can measure properly but just in case I can't, what would be the recommended next step? If the rad fans as they are are currently set to intake, would that mean the top fans should be exhaust?

 

(Sorry if these are silly questions/if I named parts incorrectly, this is still pretty confusing to me!) Thanks again for reading! 

You'll have to try physically configuring it to know for sure if it works. I had a very similar issue with cpu power cable clearance on my build with a top radiator but was able to solve it through careful experimentation and plenty of zip ties. My setup had problems if i tried to wire both of the cpu power cables through the closest hole so I ended up solving it by wiring the connecters each through a different hole which helped everything work really well with my radiator there, though your mileage may vary since your setup is different. If it doesn't fit through the top, your cable is probably long enough to come up through the cable management holes near the bottom of the mobo and go over top of the gpu to the cpu power plug. It's inelegant, but better than having your cpu rad up front imo. Top fans should be exhaust since heat rises and you want your fans to get heat out of the case as fast as possible.

 

The rear fan should definitely be exhaust since its pulling hot air out from over the top of the VRM heat sink. All intake should be through the front. Also, keep in mind that whether your fans are pushing air through your radiator or pulling air through it, the radiator will be cooled just as effectively, so you can swap the orientation of your fans relative to your radiator if one orientation suits your spatial needs better without having to worry about worsening the cooling effectiveness.

Current PC:

  • CPU
    Intel i9-12900KS
  • Motherboard
    Asus Rog Maximus Z690 Hero
  • RAM
    G.Skill Trident Z5 DDR5-6400; 2 x (16GB x 2); CL32-39-39-102; 1.40 V
  • GPU
    Aorus Xtreme Waterforce RTX 3090 TI
  • Case
    Corsair 7000D Airflow
  • Storage
    2 x 2TB WD Black sn850 SSDs
  • PSU
    EVGA Supernova 1600W P2, Fully Modular
  • Display(s)
    34" 1900R Alienware AW3418DW Black, 32" Samsung Odyssey G7 240Hz
  • Cooling
    Arctic Liquid Freezer ii 420, Built in 360mm gpu rad, 7 x 140mm Noctua NF-A14's (4 used as full case fan set, 3 used to upgrade CPU rad fans), 4 x 120mm Noctua NF-F12's (3 used to upgrade GPU rad stock fans, 1 used to fill last remaining case fan slot)
  • Keyboard
    Fidio Mechanical Gaming Keyboard
  • Mouse
    Asus Rog Spatha X
  • Sound
    SteelSeries Arctis Pro + Game DAC Wired Headset
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
  • PCPartPicker URL

 

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7 hours ago, cleric_warlock said:

I would avoid installing the radiator behind the case intake fans as it means that the air going back over the rest of your system will be warmer. 

Front mounted rads does often help CPU temps(3-7c from different tests) much more than they increase GPU temps (0-3 from different tests)

only problem with front mounted in ur case is that it has no airflow. 

 

 

7 hours ago, cleric_warlock said:

If your exhaust fan and intake fans are good enough, rising heat should be pulled out the back to avoid too much hot internal air going over the cpu rad.

heat does not rise in pc cases. 

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7 hours ago, NorKris said:

Front mounted rads does often help CPU temps(3-7c from different tests) much more than they increase GPU temps (0-3 from different tests)

only problem with front mounted in ur case is that it has no airflow. 

 

 

heat does not rise in pc cases. 

Oh, interesting, thank you! To increase airflow then should I use the new fans as intake at the top of the case and get a solid fan to replace the stock exhaust fan at the back? 

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18 minutes ago, fraeport said:

Oh, interesting, thank you! To increase airflow then should I use the new fans as intake at the top of the case and get a solid fan to replace the stock exhaust fan at the back? 

you should get a new case lol

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3 hours ago, fraeport said:

Oh, interesting, thank you! To increase airflow then should I use the new fans as intake at the top of the case and get a solid fan to replace the stock exhaust fan at the back? 

NorKris made some interesting points so I did some digging and found this interesting video from Bitwit. It turns out that top vs front mounting the cpu rad only really has an effect if your gpu is an open air cooled type (which it looks like it is). In your case, you absolutely should mount your cpu rad up front. If you end up using a blower style gpu that only exhausts out back or a gpu with a built in AIO cooler, it really won't matter whether the cpu rad is top or front because the waste heat is being routed away from the top of the case. The most important variable by far here is whether your gpu is open air cooled or not.

 

Current PC:

  • CPU
    Intel i9-12900KS
  • Motherboard
    Asus Rog Maximus Z690 Hero
  • RAM
    G.Skill Trident Z5 DDR5-6400; 2 x (16GB x 2); CL32-39-39-102; 1.40 V
  • GPU
    Aorus Xtreme Waterforce RTX 3090 TI
  • Case
    Corsair 7000D Airflow
  • Storage
    2 x 2TB WD Black sn850 SSDs
  • PSU
    EVGA Supernova 1600W P2, Fully Modular
  • Display(s)
    34" 1900R Alienware AW3418DW Black, 32" Samsung Odyssey G7 240Hz
  • Cooling
    Arctic Liquid Freezer ii 420, Built in 360mm gpu rad, 7 x 140mm Noctua NF-A14's (4 used as full case fan set, 3 used to upgrade CPU rad fans), 4 x 120mm Noctua NF-F12's (3 used to upgrade GPU rad stock fans, 1 used to fill last remaining case fan slot)
  • Keyboard
    Fidio Mechanical Gaming Keyboard
  • Mouse
    Asus Rog Spatha X
  • Sound
    SteelSeries Arctis Pro + Game DAC Wired Headset
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
  • PCPartPicker URL

 

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3 hours ago, NorKris said:

you should get a new case lol

Also what's your case model? It looks like it doesn't have a mesh front panel which means that you should definitely find some way to either remove the front panel or get a case with better airflow. A good mesh front panel is an absolute must for effective case cooling.

Current PC:

  • CPU
    Intel i9-12900KS
  • Motherboard
    Asus Rog Maximus Z690 Hero
  • RAM
    G.Skill Trident Z5 DDR5-6400; 2 x (16GB x 2); CL32-39-39-102; 1.40 V
  • GPU
    Aorus Xtreme Waterforce RTX 3090 TI
  • Case
    Corsair 7000D Airflow
  • Storage
    2 x 2TB WD Black sn850 SSDs
  • PSU
    EVGA Supernova 1600W P2, Fully Modular
  • Display(s)
    34" 1900R Alienware AW3418DW Black, 32" Samsung Odyssey G7 240Hz
  • Cooling
    Arctic Liquid Freezer ii 420, Built in 360mm gpu rad, 7 x 140mm Noctua NF-A14's (4 used as full case fan set, 3 used to upgrade CPU rad fans), 4 x 120mm Noctua NF-F12's (3 used to upgrade GPU rad stock fans, 1 used to fill last remaining case fan slot)
  • Keyboard
    Fidio Mechanical Gaming Keyboard
  • Mouse
    Asus Rog Spatha X
  • Sound
    SteelSeries Arctis Pro + Game DAC Wired Headset
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
  • PCPartPicker URL

 

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4 minutes ago, cleric_warlock said:

Also what's your case model? It looks like it doesn't have a mesh front panel which means that you should definitely find some way to either remove the front panel or get a case with better airflow. A good mesh front panel is an absolute must for effective case cooling.

My case is a H500m

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1 minute ago, NorKris said:

My case is a H500m

I was asking OP, quoted the wrong person oops

 

Current PC:

  • CPU
    Intel i9-12900KS
  • Motherboard
    Asus Rog Maximus Z690 Hero
  • RAM
    G.Skill Trident Z5 DDR5-6400; 2 x (16GB x 2); CL32-39-39-102; 1.40 V
  • GPU
    Aorus Xtreme Waterforce RTX 3090 TI
  • Case
    Corsair 7000D Airflow
  • Storage
    2 x 2TB WD Black sn850 SSDs
  • PSU
    EVGA Supernova 1600W P2, Fully Modular
  • Display(s)
    34" 1900R Alienware AW3418DW Black, 32" Samsung Odyssey G7 240Hz
  • Cooling
    Arctic Liquid Freezer ii 420, Built in 360mm gpu rad, 7 x 140mm Noctua NF-A14's (4 used as full case fan set, 3 used to upgrade CPU rad fans), 4 x 120mm Noctua NF-F12's (3 used to upgrade GPU rad stock fans, 1 used to fill last remaining case fan slot)
  • Keyboard
    Fidio Mechanical Gaming Keyboard
  • Mouse
    Asus Rog Spatha X
  • Sound
    SteelSeries Arctis Pro + Game DAC Wired Headset
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
  • PCPartPicker URL

 

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Just now, cleric_warlock said:

I was asking OP, quoted the wrong person oops

 

hehe okey

15 minutes ago, cleric_warlock said:

NorKris made some interesting points so I did some digging and found this interesting video from Bitwit. It turns out that top vs front mounting the cpu rad only really has an effect if your gpu is an open air cooled type (which it looks like it is). In your case, you absolutely should mount your cpu rad up front. If you end up using a blower style gpu that only exhausts out back or a gpu with a built in AIO cooler, it really won't matter whether the cpu rad is top or front because the waste heat is being routed away from the top of the case. The most important variable by far here is whether your gpu is open air cooled or not.

 

when top mounting rads, they sould be intake. 

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Just now, NorKris said:

when top mounting rads, they sould be intake. 

That can't be right, you want to help hot air rise out of your case as fast as possible, not stuff it back in with intake fans.

Current PC:

  • CPU
    Intel i9-12900KS
  • Motherboard
    Asus Rog Maximus Z690 Hero
  • RAM
    G.Skill Trident Z5 DDR5-6400; 2 x (16GB x 2); CL32-39-39-102; 1.40 V
  • GPU
    Aorus Xtreme Waterforce RTX 3090 TI
  • Case
    Corsair 7000D Airflow
  • Storage
    2 x 2TB WD Black sn850 SSDs
  • PSU
    EVGA Supernova 1600W P2, Fully Modular
  • Display(s)
    34" 1900R Alienware AW3418DW Black, 32" Samsung Odyssey G7 240Hz
  • Cooling
    Arctic Liquid Freezer ii 420, Built in 360mm gpu rad, 7 x 140mm Noctua NF-A14's (4 used as full case fan set, 3 used to upgrade CPU rad fans), 4 x 120mm Noctua NF-F12's (3 used to upgrade GPU rad stock fans, 1 used to fill last remaining case fan slot)
  • Keyboard
    Fidio Mechanical Gaming Keyboard
  • Mouse
    Asus Rog Spatha X
  • Sound
    SteelSeries Arctis Pro + Game DAC Wired Headset
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
  • PCPartPicker URL

 

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Just now, cleric_warlock said:

That can't be right, you want to help hot air rise out of your case as fast as possible, not stuff it back in with intake fans.

why would you help hot air rise? hot air does not rise in pc cases...?
most ppl have a back fan that take air out 

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1 minute ago, NorKris said:

why would you help hot air rise? hot air does not rise in pc cases...?
most ppl have a back fan that take air out 

It's basic thermodynamics, hot air always wants to rise no matter what because it is less dense than colder surrounding air that will naturally displace it upwards. This applies to pc cases especially. If you have top intake fans with a radiator, you're wasting a lot of energy fighting the laws of thermodynamics and trying to force the heat out through a small exhaust port in the back when you could simply be helping it rise. Every PC build guide that has touched on this issue that I've ever read strongly recommends against having intake fans on the top, especially with a rad present.

Current PC:

  • CPU
    Intel i9-12900KS
  • Motherboard
    Asus Rog Maximus Z690 Hero
  • RAM
    G.Skill Trident Z5 DDR5-6400; 2 x (16GB x 2); CL32-39-39-102; 1.40 V
  • GPU
    Aorus Xtreme Waterforce RTX 3090 TI
  • Case
    Corsair 7000D Airflow
  • Storage
    2 x 2TB WD Black sn850 SSDs
  • PSU
    EVGA Supernova 1600W P2, Fully Modular
  • Display(s)
    34" 1900R Alienware AW3418DW Black, 32" Samsung Odyssey G7 240Hz
  • Cooling
    Arctic Liquid Freezer ii 420, Built in 360mm gpu rad, 7 x 140mm Noctua NF-A14's (4 used as full case fan set, 3 used to upgrade CPU rad fans), 4 x 120mm Noctua NF-F12's (3 used to upgrade GPU rad stock fans, 1 used to fill last remaining case fan slot)
  • Keyboard
    Fidio Mechanical Gaming Keyboard
  • Mouse
    Asus Rog Spatha X
  • Sound
    SteelSeries Arctis Pro + Game DAC Wired Headset
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
  • PCPartPicker URL

 

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1 minute ago, cleric_warlock said:

It's basic thermodynamics, hot air always wants to rise no matter what because it is less dense than colder surrounding air that will naturally displace it upwards. This applies to pc cases especially. If you have top intake fans with a radiator, you're wasting a lot of energy fighting the laws of thermodynamics and trying to force the heat out through a small exhaust port in the back when you could simply be helping it rise. Every PC build guide that has touched on this issue that I've ever read strongly recommends against having intake fans on the top, especially with a rad present.

okey, lets  first start off with:  you have not tested this  youself

now lets sett over to some1 that has tested this:

GamersNexus:  "i get kinda sick of "heat rising" cuz if u actually test it yourself, its functionally irrelevant. what matters is that your pushing air with a fan spinning 1400 rpm, "heat rising", the molecular movement is something l like 4% for every 25c temp increase. "

 

i think we can take this mythic and.... 

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9 minutes ago, NorKris said:

okey, lets  first start off with:  you have not tested this  youself

now lets sett over to some1 that has tested this:

GamersNexus:  "i get kinda sick of "heat rising" cuz if u actually test it yourself, its functionally irrelevant. what matters is that your pushing air with a fan spinning 1400 rpm, "heat rising", the molecular movement is something l like 4% for every 25c temp increase. "

 

i think we can take this mythic and.... 

I'm sorry but if you're referring to Gamer's Nexus' video on properly mounting coolers, he doesn't even address this issue specifically in that video. I'd like to see the link for that video you seem to be mentioning because the science just flat out does not support intake fans on top at all. GN's website also has this helpful visual explanation of exactly what I've been saying here https://www.gamersnexus.net/guides/692-how-many-case-fans-should-you-have. It seems likely that you may have misinterpreted something GN said at some point. The added risk with intake fans on top is that you may get forced convection cycles that essentially trap hot air in the case which is obviously bad. The potential extra positive pressure in the case from intake fans on top is not enough of a benefit to outweigh the problem of forcing hot air back down into the case.

Current PC:

  • CPU
    Intel i9-12900KS
  • Motherboard
    Asus Rog Maximus Z690 Hero
  • RAM
    G.Skill Trident Z5 DDR5-6400; 2 x (16GB x 2); CL32-39-39-102; 1.40 V
  • GPU
    Aorus Xtreme Waterforce RTX 3090 TI
  • Case
    Corsair 7000D Airflow
  • Storage
    2 x 2TB WD Black sn850 SSDs
  • PSU
    EVGA Supernova 1600W P2, Fully Modular
  • Display(s)
    34" 1900R Alienware AW3418DW Black, 32" Samsung Odyssey G7 240Hz
  • Cooling
    Arctic Liquid Freezer ii 420, Built in 360mm gpu rad, 7 x 140mm Noctua NF-A14's (4 used as full case fan set, 3 used to upgrade CPU rad fans), 4 x 120mm Noctua NF-F12's (3 used to upgrade GPU rad stock fans, 1 used to fill last remaining case fan slot)
  • Keyboard
    Fidio Mechanical Gaming Keyboard
  • Mouse
    Asus Rog Spatha X
  • Sound
    SteelSeries Arctis Pro + Game DAC Wired Headset
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
  • PCPartPicker URL

 

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2 minutes ago, cleric_warlock said:

GN's website also has this helpful visual explanation of exactly what I've been saying here https://www.gamersnexus.net/guides/692-how-many-case-fans-should-you-have. It seems likely that you may have misinterpreted something GN said at some poin

yes your right, in 2011 when GN didnt know better(just like...) they posted that. 

4 minutes ago, cleric_warlock said:

It seems likely that you may have misinterpreted something GN said at some point. 

it was some weeks ago in a livestream he said this (its 2+hours long). 

 

5 minutes ago, cleric_warlock said:

the science just flat out does not support intake fans on top at all.  The added risk with intake fans on top is that you may get forced convection cycles that essentially trap hot air in the case which is obviously bad. The potential extra positive pressure in the case from intake fans on top is not enough of a benefit to outweigh the problem of forcing hot air back down into the case.

it does not?

image.png.e4ccc7c809f3c68f35df1fc4b9eb5977.png

 

take a look at temps were the rad is at the top.. ur best case is nr 8... and mine is 3. 

ouch...!

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5 minutes ago, NorKris said:

yes your right, in 2011 when GN didnt know better(just like...) they posted that. 

it was some weeks ago in a livestream he said this (its 2+hours long). 

 

it does not?

image.png.e4ccc7c809f3c68f35df1fc4b9eb5977.png

 

take a look at temps were the rad is at the top.. ur best case is nr 8... and mine is 3. 

ouch...!

post the link to the video here please, these somewhat vague results are useless without seeing exactly how the test was conducted and what test setup he was using 

Current PC:

  • CPU
    Intel i9-12900KS
  • Motherboard
    Asus Rog Maximus Z690 Hero
  • RAM
    G.Skill Trident Z5 DDR5-6400; 2 x (16GB x 2); CL32-39-39-102; 1.40 V
  • GPU
    Aorus Xtreme Waterforce RTX 3090 TI
  • Case
    Corsair 7000D Airflow
  • Storage
    2 x 2TB WD Black sn850 SSDs
  • PSU
    EVGA Supernova 1600W P2, Fully Modular
  • Display(s)
    34" 1900R Alienware AW3418DW Black, 32" Samsung Odyssey G7 240Hz
  • Cooling
    Arctic Liquid Freezer ii 420, Built in 360mm gpu rad, 7 x 140mm Noctua NF-A14's (4 used as full case fan set, 3 used to upgrade CPU rad fans), 4 x 120mm Noctua NF-F12's (3 used to upgrade GPU rad stock fans, 1 used to fill last remaining case fan slot)
  • Keyboard
    Fidio Mechanical Gaming Keyboard
  • Mouse
    Asus Rog Spatha X
  • Sound
    SteelSeries Arctis Pro + Game DAC Wired Headset
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
  • PCPartPicker URL

 

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4 minutes ago, cleric_warlock said:

post the link to the video here please, these somewhat vague results are useless without seeing exactly how the test was conducted and what test setup he was using 

vague is the words i would use too if i first said that rads should not use cold air lol.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUDynAJnPx8&t=11s

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37 minutes ago, NorKris said:

vague is the words i would use too if i first said that rads should not use cold air lol.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUDynAJnPx8&t=11s

So Steve mentioned this vid in a livestream? Because it's not actually a Gamer's Nexus vid. I'm going to play with my fan configs some more because this is the kind of thing where the results will probably vary depending on the exact layout of your case and the exact rates of heat transfer from your components to the air. Her case also has a glass front panel, which could definitely be affecting things including making top and rear intake more effective due to blockage of the front. It's also important to note that top and back intake means that front needs to be exhaust, which makes sense. Her best result was rear and top intake with front exhaust which is actually smart considering that the rear fan airstream is probably helping to push all of the hot air that might get stuck in a forced convection cycle out the front. But for OP I would suggest starting with the "vanilla" safe configuration of exhaust rear and top and intake front and then experiment from there because the improvements are pretty marginal and OP might be wasting time trying to find thermal headroom that they don't even really need and may not even be there depending on their specific setup.

Current PC:

  • CPU
    Intel i9-12900KS
  • Motherboard
    Asus Rog Maximus Z690 Hero
  • RAM
    G.Skill Trident Z5 DDR5-6400; 2 x (16GB x 2); CL32-39-39-102; 1.40 V
  • GPU
    Aorus Xtreme Waterforce RTX 3090 TI
  • Case
    Corsair 7000D Airflow
  • Storage
    2 x 2TB WD Black sn850 SSDs
  • PSU
    EVGA Supernova 1600W P2, Fully Modular
  • Display(s)
    34" 1900R Alienware AW3418DW Black, 32" Samsung Odyssey G7 240Hz
  • Cooling
    Arctic Liquid Freezer ii 420, Built in 360mm gpu rad, 7 x 140mm Noctua NF-A14's (4 used as full case fan set, 3 used to upgrade CPU rad fans), 4 x 120mm Noctua NF-F12's (3 used to upgrade GPU rad stock fans, 1 used to fill last remaining case fan slot)
  • Keyboard
    Fidio Mechanical Gaming Keyboard
  • Mouse
    Asus Rog Spatha X
  • Sound
    SteelSeries Arctis Pro + Game DAC Wired Headset
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
  • PCPartPicker URL

 

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5 minutes ago, cleric_warlock said:

So Steve mentioned this vid in a livestream? Because it's not actually a Gamer's Nexus vid. I'm going to play with my fan configs some more because this is the kind of thing where the results will probably vary depending on the exact layout of your case and the exact rates of heat transfer from your components to the air. Her case also has a glass front panel, which could definitely be affecting things. It's also important to note that top and back intake means that front needs to be exhaust, which makes sense. Her best result was rear and top intake with front exhaust which is actually smart considering that the rear fan airstream is probably helping to push all of the hot air that might get stuck in a forced convection cycle out the front. But for OP I would suggest starting with the "vanilla" safe configuration of exhaust rear and top and intake front and then experiment from there because the improvements are pretty marginal and OP might be wasting time trying to find thermal headroom that they don't even really need and may not even be there depending on their specific setup.

no GN did not mention this. This is just the best test i have seen that demo's that cold air inn is best...
just to point out ur front panel thing. she has a vid where the rad is front mounted too (you have seen the pic, so you know that won...) so there goes the front theory out.

 

GN in a live stream (i dont remember at what time) answered a superchat on fans bla bla and hot air rising. 

and GN answered that hot air rising is not a relevant thing in Pc's. Talking about 4% for every 24c difference in temp... 

 

but u need to tell us why taking hot air into ur cpu is good.....?

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1 hour ago, cleric_warlock said:

Also what's your case model? It looks like it doesn't have a mesh front panel which means that you should definitely find some way to either remove the front panel or get a case with better airflow. A good mesh front panel is an absolute must for effective case cooling.

hey, sorry for delayed response! the case is a gamer storm macube 310. i know the best solution is to upgrade my case, but i'm not quite ready to do that yet (both financially and research wise) and so i was just wondering if there's anything i can do presently to improve my current situation. my cpu and gpu temps both idle around 30 degrees right now and are not often under load so it's not urgent at all, just a bit of a bandaid until i have a case with better airflow :') 

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5 minutes ago, NorKris said:

no GN did not mention this. This is just the best test i have seen that demo's that cold air inn is best...
just to point out ur front panel thing. she has a vid where the rad is front mounted too (you have seen the pic, so you know that won...) so there goes the front theory out.

 

GN in a live stream (i dont remember at what time) answered a superchat on fans bla bla and hot air rising. 

and GN answered that hot air rising is not a relevant thing in Pc's. Talking about 4% for every 24c difference in temp... 

 

but u need to tell us why taking hot air into ur cpu is good.....?

You're continuing to miss a lot of the nuance of what I said earlier. CPU heat is already being routed away by the AIO so how the heat of the gpu is being managed is the main concern here. OP has an open air cooled gpu and as a result enough heat will rise into a top mounted cpu rad for it to matter so op should mount cpu rad to the front. If the gpu has some kind of water block cooling or a blower enclosure that dumps all hot air out the back, then the air rising from the rest of the case is not hot enough to make a significant difference to cpu temps as Bitwit specifically showed. The rest of this cooling problem is literally just splitting hairs about what exact fan configuration is best for any given setup, a question that can only be answered by testing specifically for that setup and that setup alone. Start with the vanilla config I mentioned earlier and you will be fine, experiment if you feel like it. Results will vary depending on your build. Simple as that.

Current PC:

  • CPU
    Intel i9-12900KS
  • Motherboard
    Asus Rog Maximus Z690 Hero
  • RAM
    G.Skill Trident Z5 DDR5-6400; 2 x (16GB x 2); CL32-39-39-102; 1.40 V
  • GPU
    Aorus Xtreme Waterforce RTX 3090 TI
  • Case
    Corsair 7000D Airflow
  • Storage
    2 x 2TB WD Black sn850 SSDs
  • PSU
    EVGA Supernova 1600W P2, Fully Modular
  • Display(s)
    34" 1900R Alienware AW3418DW Black, 32" Samsung Odyssey G7 240Hz
  • Cooling
    Arctic Liquid Freezer ii 420, Built in 360mm gpu rad, 7 x 140mm Noctua NF-A14's (4 used as full case fan set, 3 used to upgrade CPU rad fans), 4 x 120mm Noctua NF-F12's (3 used to upgrade GPU rad stock fans, 1 used to fill last remaining case fan slot)
  • Keyboard
    Fidio Mechanical Gaming Keyboard
  • Mouse
    Asus Rog Spatha X
  • Sound
    SteelSeries Arctis Pro + Game DAC Wired Headset
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
  • PCPartPicker URL

 

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2 minutes ago, fraeport said:

hey, sorry for delayed response! the case is a gamer storm macube 310. i know the best solution is to upgrade my case, but i'm not quite ready to do that yet (both financially and research wise) and so i was just wondering if there's anything i can do presently to improve my current situation. my cpu and gpu temps both idle around 30 degrees right now and are not often under load so it's not urgent at all, just a bit of a bandaid until i have a case with better airflow :') 

Take off the front panel, that panel is murdering your airflow. If you do that, you should be fine.

Current PC:

  • CPU
    Intel i9-12900KS
  • Motherboard
    Asus Rog Maximus Z690 Hero
  • RAM
    G.Skill Trident Z5 DDR5-6400; 2 x (16GB x 2); CL32-39-39-102; 1.40 V
  • GPU
    Aorus Xtreme Waterforce RTX 3090 TI
  • Case
    Corsair 7000D Airflow
  • Storage
    2 x 2TB WD Black sn850 SSDs
  • PSU
    EVGA Supernova 1600W P2, Fully Modular
  • Display(s)
    34" 1900R Alienware AW3418DW Black, 32" Samsung Odyssey G7 240Hz
  • Cooling
    Arctic Liquid Freezer ii 420, Built in 360mm gpu rad, 7 x 140mm Noctua NF-A14's (4 used as full case fan set, 3 used to upgrade CPU rad fans), 4 x 120mm Noctua NF-F12's (3 used to upgrade GPU rad stock fans, 1 used to fill last remaining case fan slot)
  • Keyboard
    Fidio Mechanical Gaming Keyboard
  • Mouse
    Asus Rog Spatha X
  • Sound
    SteelSeries Arctis Pro + Game DAC Wired Headset
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
  • PCPartPicker URL

 

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