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nyereyn

Do prebuilt system's motherboards use less power?

Just now, nyereyn said:

Do prebuilt systems use less power (as some would say) or is it just a myth? 

How would they, they're the exact same parts plus or minus some proprietary nonsense to make them most cost effective to assemble.

 

A Dell system doing 12VO doesn't save any energy. At least not something you could measure.

 

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Do prebuilt systems use less power (as some would say) or is it just a myth? 

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Posted · Best Answer
Just now, nyereyn said:

Do prebuilt systems use less power (as some would say) or is it just a myth? 

How would they, they're the exact same parts plus or minus some proprietary nonsense to make them most cost effective to assemble.

 

A Dell system doing 12VO doesn't save any energy. At least not something you could measure.

 

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i have a theory (if it is true)

you know cpus have power consumption of or example 100w with core voltages about 1v

so cpu have to draw 100 and it will so motherboard convert high voltage (12v) low ampere to low voltage(core voltage) and high ampere with dc-dc converters. in some motherboards they have higher efficiency  and therefore power consumption is lower by between 10 to 30w 


if it was useful give it a like :) btw if your into linux pay a visit here  and i will be thankful if you send me an opinion here  

 

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Maybe "they" (whoever "some" are)  ment business PCs? These are often optimized for energy effiency, because if a company uses 1000 or 10000s PCs, the impact on the power bill is noticable. The manufacturer does this by developing custom boards and components (which is only feasible in high production numbers), so that the PC works most efficiant for the tasks it was designed for. The cost of this is losing flexibilty (upgrades, repair, etc.).

Normal retail PCs sometimes, when they use cheap components for cost savings, can even be worse than a DIY PC. But, I guess, even in DIY you can go th cheap way :)

 

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The myth might come from the fact that AFAIK all prebuilt PCs (from Dell/HP etc.) come with locked CPUs and weak GPUs.

A system built with those exact specs would use the same amount of power (maybe even a bit less as you could use a higher end PSU with higher efficiency).

But prebuilt systems are known to cost more than a custom PC with the same specs so most people can get more performance for the same amount of money.

This usually means an unlocked CPU and a higher end GPU, which draw more power.

 

The motherboard quality is actually often worse, as they don't want to spend a cent more than they have to and they get them custom made for those lower TDP locked CPUs they put in them.


PC: CPU: Intel i7-4790 MB: Gigabyte B85N RAM: Adata 4GB + Kingston 8GB SSD: Samsung 850 EVO 500GB GPU: XFX GTR RX 480 8GB Case: TBD PSU: Corsair RM1000i KB: TBD Mouse: Logitech G502 Proteus Core Mousepad: Steelseries QcK Headphones: Sennheiser HD555
Phone: Samsung Galaxy S7
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Posted (edited)

They use less powered hardware in general, not moboz especially. For example an i7 9700u uses less power that is what "u" means, as "k" means unlocked, GPU uses a similar idea and I don't know about monitors, I think in general they are less bright. 

Think that my PC along with all the peripherals it's using about 330 Watt in full load and a laptop has a 100 Watt PSU.

But sometimes the summary of all the hardware is more than the PSU can feed, so in the rare case that they are all used in maximum, motherboard sacrifices some of the energy, and shares between GPU and CPU

Edit: I saw laptop instead of prebuild sorry >.<

Edited by PeachGr
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