Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

scotartt

Member
  • Content Count

    36
  • Joined

  • Last visited


Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    scotartt reacted to Dredgy in Backing Up Your Life is THIS Easy   
    Yes, though you’re using the wrong abbreviations ? Is painfully confusing though.
     
    kB = kilobyte = 1000 bytes (this is what drive manufacturers use) Metric
    KiB = kibibyte = 1024 bytes (this what Windows usually uses, though it uses the incorrect abbreviation)
    Both of the above are a measurement of how many bytes (1 byte = 8 bits).
     
    kb = kilobit = 1000bits = 125 bytes.
    This is usually how internet speed is measured.
     
    In the old days, when things were still measured in kilobytes or megabytes, it didn’t really matter that there was a difference, as visually, 1000 is equal to 1024.
     
    As capacities grow, this will become a bigger problem, though still relatively minor. Already people have accused companies of misrepresenting the size of hard drives.
     
    As we saw above, 14 terabytes = 12.73 tebibytes.
    when you get bigger, 14 petabytes = 12.43 pebibytes
    and even bigger, 14 exabytes = just 12.14 exbibytes.
     
    Though we are many decades away from having 14 exabyte hard drives, a more reasonable example might be found at say 100 terabytes. If someone were to buy a 100TB hard drive and windows showed it as 90TB (when it is in fact 90TiB), I don’t think it’s unreasonable for a consumer to feel short changed.
     
    The easiest solution would be for Windows to show everything using the metric standard that everyone’s familiar with, as it would be relatively consequence free.
     
     
     
     
     
  2. Like
    scotartt reacted to JonoT in Backing Up Your Life is THIS Easy   
  3. Like
    scotartt got a reaction from TempestCatto in What do you think Apple should do to be better and still set itself apart from competitors?   
    Make the iPhone/IPad run both iOS and macOS -- and make them automatically switch between the two when you drop it on a wireless docking station connected to a monitor, mouse, and keyboard. Maybe the docking station could have an extra A* series processor in it and a graphics card for extra desktop points as well as wirelessly charge the phone battery.
     
    Basically, make the "laptop" redundant. All you carry with you is your storage, a display, and a processor. enough to get portable work done, and then have the "desktop" experience when you're at a desk.
     
     
  4. Informative
    scotartt got a reaction from Hi P in Front-end and Back-end Developers   
    That's a pretty solid plan. I'd put git a higher, like second.
     
    As for how you learn the software engineering side of things? After you've got the basics of your language out of the way, there are software engineering books (websites etc too) and probably a ton of courseware on sites like Brilliant and Skillshare and those sites that seem to be advertised on every second science and tech you tube channel. ?
     
  5. Informative
    scotartt reacted to Fetzie in What is a good way to get better at For Loops (C++/Java)   
    Also if you are removing things from the thing you are iterating on, remember to use a concurrency-compatible operation.
  6. Informative
    scotartt reacted to Hi P in Front-end and Back-end Developers   
    I did an extensive search for jobs around me after my first post, and I agree with you, around me Java and Node.js are both equally dominant in terms of demand, C#, PHP and Python not so much (if any at all), and the most demanded framework is Spring
     
    So my plan as I write this is (not in a particular order, besides from Java being the first) :
     
    1) The basics of Java, I'm halfway through the course which includes and intro to JUnit, databases with SQLite, and Networking
    2) MySQL and MongoDB
    3) Spring framework
    4) RESTful services
    5) Git and Github
     
    I will also learn Node.js once I'm comfortable with back-end in Java, I want to grasp the concepts on a single language before moving into another, but I definitely will learn Node.js that's for sure
     
    How do I learn that?
     
    What I've been doing so far has been google every single time I learn something new
    "Java convention for X thing"  /  "X thing good coding practices"
     
    Also, thank you very much, that was some solid input
  7. Like
    scotartt reacted to Uttamattamakin in 10 Ways Mac OS is just BETTER   
    I can respect your reasons for not wanting to try Linux because of that eternal struggle.  Using Linux in the early 00's up to maybe even 2010 one could not be sure if their wifi would work, or the sound, or the graphics or the printer or ...
     
    There was always something.  Times have changed though. 
     
    I ran Linux on a Microsoft Surface Pro 1 to write my MS Thesis in LaTeX.    Everything worked easily.   On my current Surface Pro everything works except the LTE modem so a basic consumer surface pro would work flawlessly.  On my laptop for gaming and CUDA GP GPU programming everything works.  (Getting Nvidia CUDA to work was causing problems until I realized it is designed to treat an EGPU as being strictly for compute.) 

    I mean worked easily even without me needing to configure anything at all.   
     
    The days of "win-modem" and "Win-printer" are gone. 
     
    You are quite correct though.  Some things need MS office 365 and other things that are only found in the proprietary OS's.  That is why when I do use Linux most of the time I visualize my dual boot, and only boot to Linux for special occasions.  
  8. Like
    scotartt reacted to Uttamattamakin in 10 Ways Mac OS is just BETTER   
    Hi DPI support.... Yeah.  At least not in a straightforward way.  I have had good results with the latest versions of KDE and Gnome for display scaling.  Under Wayland it is a lot better BUT then NVIDIA does not have good open source drivers for Wayland. 

    Having LaTeX online is just not the same as having it on your own computer.  On my own computer I can be sure I have the fonts, packages, and everything else I need to compile my documents.    The students who have amazed me so far.  

    I had one student who I merely said the word LaTeX.  She installed it from source, and learned how to use it on her own.  Yeah... she was using a Macintosh.  
  9. Informative
    scotartt got a reaction from Hi P in Front-end and Back-end Developers   
    Advice for the OP.
     
  10. Informative
    scotartt got a reaction from Hi P in Front-end and Back-end Developers   
    It is super-heavyweight and the trend is long established towards writing light-weight single-purpose services running in disposable containers like Docker or Kubernetes. 
  11. Like
    scotartt reacted to bowrilla in Best language for backend web dev   
    Azure also supports node.js/javascript. Not saying those languages aren't good or powerful choices. But for a beginner who also has to get into frontend development learning two languages in parallel is not really a clever choice. You can also just run your node.js app on a local docker machine or a rented VM - that's also a cloud solution. The OP is not interested in using Java along with Spring so Azure's Java support is not really a point here. Besides, the OP is going to use OpenStack so Azure is pretty irrelevant here. Your answer sort of misses the point here. It's sort of like answering the question for a light 2 person tent for casual backcountry hiking in the summer with recommending expedition style tents that a used at Mount Everest basecamps: sure, these are viable and potentially powerful options but not what was asked for.
     
    Because PHP is a pretty screwed up quirky language that is mostly used due to legacy. PHP grew as a language over more than 2 decades and the structure and syntax shows. It works for sure, but there are more modern options here. 
  12. Funny
    scotartt reacted to Bramimond in But why do you use Windows??   
    My workplace is forcing me to. I asked for Linux, but everyone started laughing.
  13. Funny
    scotartt reacted to James in But why do you use Windows??   
    Hey guys! We're doing another "10 Reasons _____ is just Better" video - this time with WINDOWS. Now's your chance to tell us what you love about Windows and/or why Windows is better than MacOS/ Linux.
     
     
     
     
     
  14. Like
    scotartt reacted to Uttamattamakin in 10 Ways Mac OS is just BETTER   
    Yeah..  I remember seeing people interact with old mini computers and such  with a type writer attached to them.   Most of these kids have no idea that the whole "terminal" and command line  interface comes from that.  NONE at all.  

    Which is why I brought this up here.  We have developers saying they need Unix on their own personal computer to do their Dev work.  That this is something to love about Mac OS.  Developers who, often, have access to remote servers with more power.   This brings me to the KEY reason MacOS being based on Unix really is not a strength of the OS.

    Unix / Linux  clearly has advantages since all successful smart phones, and web servers run on some variant of Unix or Linux.    For some reason it just doesn't make sense to do that on the Personal Computer.  The reason is HARDWARE.  MAC OS is what it is because it runs on carefully selected hardware for which it is optimized.   The same is true for iOS, and for Android, and for the UNIX / Linux builds that are ran on web servers. 
     
    Windows has the ability to mold itself, like clay, to whatever computer you put it on. If Windows can boot on a device it will TRY to make itself work.That is what a strong OS would do. 
     
    A strong OS is not so fragile that it will refuse to work unless you buy the hardware SPECIFICALLY FOR IT.   That is not a great thing about an OS.
  15. Like
    scotartt reacted to Uttamattamakin in 10 Ways Mac OS is just BETTER   
    If you want the ease of use and to have a good time with it.  If you want to spend so much time with Kext files and fearing updates that will break your system hackintosh it.  

    Hackintoshing is, in that respect, no different than running Linux (Or since I brought it up Sun Solaris UNIX.) 
  16. Like
    scotartt got a reaction from kirashi in 10 Ways Mac OS is just BETTER   
    Dude, i'm way older than you. You were ... 8 or 9 years old when i enrolled in computer science. When i built my first linux kernel (i.e. compiled it) I got a four-port serial card, put it in my PC, and then went dumpster diving up in the local tech park and came back with a couple of VT220 terminals which I RS-232'd to a couple of the serial ports. Instant multi-user local login.
     
    Oh, do you know why you login to a "terminal" it used to be assigned an identifier like "ttyS0"? TTY means teletype. So .. you know how "vi" has two parts, "vi" and "ed" (ed's the bit you get when you type esc-:)? It's like that because it's meant to run on a teletype. You would "ed" somefile, then type ':g1" and the teletype would print line 1. Then you'd edit it e.g. s/mispeling/misspelling/ and voila! it would print the corrected line 1. You could even  "cat" the whole file and it would proceed to print, literally, on the teletype. No need for "more" or "less", those programs didn't make sense on a teletype.
     
    Look at this command line output in terminal in a mac:
    $ w 21:06 up 3 days, 19:39, 18 users, load averages: 1.38 1.54 1.64 USER TTY FROM LOGIN@ IDLE WHAT xxxxxxx console - Sun01 3days - xxxxxxx s000 - Sun01 2:34 -bash It's still called a "TTY".
     
    I work in aviation, we still have data formats that are meant to be wrapped as "TYPE B" teletype messages. They are 5-bit (ONLY CAPS ALLOWED).
     
    Oh, yeah, also one computer i worked on had old-fashioned "core" memory (Linus shows that off in that Saturn-V computer video). those magnetic cores are why you'll still find a file called "core" written to the storage when Linux does a "coredump".
     
    Anyway, /bin/sh and its descendants like bash do not emulate the terminal. /bin/sh is a command interpreter, primarily. 
     
    lmao, kids today, get off my lawn, etc.
  17. Like
    scotartt got a reaction from Video Beagle in 10 Ways Mac OS is just BETTER   
    Dude, i'm way older than you. You were ... 8 or 9 years old when i enrolled in computer science. When i built my first linux kernel (i.e. compiled it) I got a four-port serial card, put it in my PC, and then went dumpster diving up in the local tech park and came back with a couple of VT220 terminals which I RS-232'd to a couple of the serial ports. Instant multi-user local login.
     
    Oh, do you know why you login to a "terminal" it used to be assigned an identifier like "ttyS0"? TTY means teletype. So .. you know how "vi" has two parts, "vi" and "ed" (ed's the bit you get when you type esc-:)? It's like that because it's meant to run on a teletype. You would "ed" somefile, then type ':g1" and the teletype would print line 1. Then you'd edit it e.g. s/mispeling/misspelling/ and voila! it would print the corrected line 1. You could even  "cat" the whole file and it would proceed to print, literally, on the teletype. No need for "more" or "less", those programs didn't make sense on a teletype.
     
    Look at this command line output in terminal in a mac:
    $ w 21:06 up 3 days, 19:39, 18 users, load averages: 1.38 1.54 1.64 USER TTY FROM LOGIN@ IDLE WHAT xxxxxxx console - Sun01 3days - xxxxxxx s000 - Sun01 2:34 -bash It's still called a "TTY".
     
    I work in aviation, we still have data formats that are meant to be wrapped as "TYPE B" teletype messages. They are 5-bit (ONLY CAPS ALLOWED).
     
    Oh, yeah, also one computer i worked on had old-fashioned "core" memory (Linus shows that off in that Saturn-V computer video). those magnetic cores are why you'll still find a file called "core" written to the storage when Linux does a "coredump".
     
    Anyway, /bin/sh and its descendants like bash do not emulate the terminal. /bin/sh is a command interpreter, primarily. 
     
    lmao, kids today, get off my lawn, etc.
  18. Like
    scotartt reacted to Sauron in The sad state of the American news media...   
    They didn't remove it, it's still there:
    However it seems that the shooting itself was not politically motivated, or at least there is no clear evidence that it was.
     
    From the witnesses' accounts it seems that it was more the random action of a madman flipping out than anything political, but that remains to be confirmed.
    So... it seems to me you have a narrative here
  19. Like
    scotartt reacted to tridy in 10 Ways Mac OS is just BETTER   
    In Service Fabric, for example, there are several copies/nodes that are covering for each other, so if one goes down, another takes over it. All of this is running on the SF on the local machine. In the cloud different nodes will be on different machines, but that is handled automatically. There is no need to think vms, containers, etc.
     
     
    The company should not be controlling the tools you are using for your work. Most of the time I bring my own tools for the job. I do not rely on the company's tools. That is like this in every other aspects of live. You are not expected to have tools when a plumber comes to fix something, are you?
     
     
    All work in different ways, I use my own set of tools and have scripts that set the branches, checks out, etc. Sometimes I have to use command line, and command line will be the most able tool, there is no question there. What I do for myself is the hotkey that runs the script that, for example sets the branch, pulls the changes and opens IDE, instead of writing 2 commands in the command line and starting the IDE manually after that. It is not productive to write the same commands over and over again, I believe.
     
     
    Again, command line will always be the most powerful. GUIs most often run on top of the command lines. Command lines give you the ability to orchestrate the workflows and create scripts. I do that myself - I create my own GUIs that run those scripts, or assign the hotkeys. For example, if one is writing the full command line for "cat infile.txt ..." manually every hour, then it is not that productive.
     
     
    Interesting. This is where Microsoft PowerShell comes in, where it returns the objects and properties and there no need to "pipe" anything from one place to another. So, I give a point to PowerShell against any "text based" command line here. PowerShell does work on Mac and Linux as well, but I have never worked on Mac or Linux with PowerShell myself.
     
     
    The great thing about the command line is that one can create UI for that, but it is not possible (or hard) to script/command line where there is only UI.
     
  20. Like
    scotartt reacted to Video Beagle in 10 Ways Mac OS is just BETTER   
    Here's a "right click" contextual menu in Waterfox (left) and Finder (right).

     
    There's been contextual menus since...well, can't remember OS9 too much right now, but likely in there, and before.
    And if you don't have a two button mouse, there's STILL the contextual menu using Control-Click, or gestures or whatever your device uses.
     
    That YOU don't know about common features of the OS doesn't mean they're not there.
     
    Your inability to know the difference between an Apple II and maybe a Macintosh II...or your unsure remembrance of using what would have been a 3-6 year old computer when you were 8 almost a quarter of century ago, might mean that perhaps the opinions and/or information you have about it might be....at best... out of date, if not flat out ill informed.
  21. Agree
    scotartt got a reaction from Satanic_Jesus in 10 Ways Mac OS is just BETTER   
    I don't understand how a service would be redundant if it runs on a single machine? I don't quite get the point you're making here, I think.
     
     
    I don't know, because the first time I realised it was a gigantic pain in the ass was the last time I ever tried to adapt a Windows machine for use a development environment.
     
    Someone else pointed out, 'what if worked at a company without Visual Studio'. That's true, maybe they do a lot of pair programming and need a standardised IDE so all the developers know the IDE on every machine. Or maybe they develop mostly in a language that isn't supported (Kotlin? Go? Python?).
     
    However, my take on this is slightly different: Never be reliant on the IDE. IDEs are nice and all, and provide tremendous productivity to developers (i.e. refactoring), but in my view developers who get stuck in that groove are often bamboozled when confronted with a problem the IDE cannot solve or one it created in the first place. This I've found especially true of visual source control tools. I never use the one in Intellij or Pycharm. I always use `git` on the command line. 
     
    I do sometimes use GitKraken to visualise what's going on with the branches, so that I can craft an effective strategy in a particularly tricky rebase or merge situation. But once I've done that, I'm usually running the commands with git in the shell ... and resolving merge conflicts with Atom, at most.
     
     
    Call me old school, but I did computer science when my school required most of its assignments written and submitted from your shell account on a SunOS server with dial-up access.
     
    I think the logic with the command line runs like this: while a GUI feels more intuitive at first, and has an easier learning curve, however in the long run the command line is more flexible, more powerful, and most importantly, it's also composable:
    $ cat infile.txt | acommand --option --doitproperly | anothercommand --works --verbose | finalcommand > outfile.txt This is a large part of what I mean about the Unix Philosophy. Write small programs that do one thing well, and use a standard way to get input into and output from those programs.
     
    Macs, because of the shell, and the underlying BSD roots, have this, and they have the GUI niceness. Linux has the former, and Windows has the latter, but in my experience, only Macs have both.
     
     
  22. Funny
    scotartt reacted to Video Beagle in 10 Ways Mac OS is just BETTER   
    1993?  I was using an Apple II in 1983 (and before that). The Macintosh had been around for 9 years in 1993.
  23. Like
    scotartt reacted to abazigal in 10 Ways Mac OS is just BETTER   
    Maybe it's a way to distract themselves from the shortcomings of their own platform. I mean, windows phone is  dead. Ventures like Hololens have very little consumer appeal. I had no idea that Mixer even existed until they signed Ninja on. While financially successful, Microsoft seems to have very little mindshare or influence outside of the corporate world, where it's probably inertia keeping them from switching away from office than anything else. 
     
    I don't understand it either, and I probably never will, but you know what? It doesn't matter in the greater scheme of things. Apple isn't going anywhere in the near future, and they will continue to make the products that I love to use and which work so well from me, from the iphone to the Apple Watch to AirPods to the iPad and the iMac. And prosper for it. 
     
    Let the haters hate. It will make absolutely zero difference in the end. 
  24. Agree
    scotartt reacted to Video Beagle in 10 Ways Mac OS is just BETTER   
    One thing, related to this....
    People LOVE Macs.
    (likewise, some people LOVE linux)
    No one LOVES windows.....people USE windows....they may also "HATE" Macs....but they still don't LOVE Windows.
     
    I've always found that interesting.
  25. Like
    scotartt reacted to handymanshandle in 10 Ways Mac OS is just BETTER   
    Remember kids, if you can force your opinion as fact, then you’ve succeeded!
    I don’t understand this forum’s massive disdain for when Apple anything does something better than someone else. I have my qualms but this thread isn’t necessarily about explaining that. It just kinda saddens me.
×