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Trying to find a good memory optimizer...

I have a low end laptop, and I am trying my best to optimize Windows. One thing I have noticed that whenever I reboot, when idle, my memory usage is X, and after doing some work like web browsing and file browsing and running some programs, but after that when I close them all and take a look at my memory usage, it has risen up a little bit, even if I don't have any programs open. So there is some data in memory that can be deallocated. I have come across a lot of memory clean programs (such as RAMMap) which work well, but they don't really have options to what to clear out from memory. They have the option to clean working sets, but that options really slows my device down for a while. All I want to do is tidy up the memory management. I want a program that scan the memory and let me choose what to clean.

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What you are seeing is probably superfetch that is "holding" onto the memory. The held memory is released once a program requires that memory.

There is no memory optimizer program needed.

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there isnt a good memory optimizer, because "optimizing memory" is a fairly useless premise.

 

memory sitting empty is wasted memory, so windows will constantly adjust it's own memory usage to make use of what's available, or clear out what's necessary.

 

that's why my low end netbook only sees about 1GB of memory usage for windows itself, and my 32GB RAM desktop is currently sitting at 9GB with just a webbrowser and discord running. 'tidying up' my desktop's memory usage would only result in things being slower, because what would otherwise have been in ram would have to be loaded from disk if it's necessary again.

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Typically that memory is a result of caching, in the event you access it again later, or the result of a background service.

The memory that is cached, should be readily available to the system at any given time.

 

The only thing Memory management tools really do is clear the memory cache and close background processes, which typically end up being restarted. So in reality they do little to nothing and can often have a negative impact on frequently used programs.

 

Chances are if it's in memory and in use, something needs it. If your goal is to limit background processes that consume memory, you need it find out what uses it, then either disable it's Service Entry or uninstall it and find an alternative.

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