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First custom loop; a few concerns

I'm doing my first custom loop, and I have been doing a lot of research.  I however have not been able to find the answer to some of my concerns.

 

First I will list my hardware:

  • i9 10900K
  • Asus Maxiums Hero XII
  • 64GB Corsair Vengence Pro RGB 3200MHz
  • 3x 1TB Samsung 970 Evo Plus
  • 3x 1TB Samaung 860 Evo
  • Lian Li O11 Dynamic
  • Corsair AX1200i
  • Asus Strix 1080Ti (Only because I'm waiting for Nvidia Ampere)

I'm pretty sure I'm not forgetting anything. 

 

I ordered this: O11D Distro Plate G1

 

I'm obviously going to be doing hard tubing.

 

Some of my concerns pertain to the thickness of the wall of the acrylic tubing.  Before asking them, I will list the options the EKWB offers--Most, if not all, cooling components will be from EKWB--for Acrylic.

I will list the Pro's and Con's that I believe each option has:

 

EK-HD Tube 10/12mm:

I was almost set on using this size of tubing because my build is kind of medium sized, and having 12/16mm would kind of overpower the final look.  After doing some thinking however, I started to believe that doing the bends on tubing that has a 2mm wall could possibly have catastrophic results in that there may not be enough Tube to successfully do a complete 90 Degree bend.  Now I know this may sound a bit far-fetched, but I am a beginner when it comes to custom loops, and with that being said, I know I should probably start with soft tubing, but I don't wanna.

 

Another thing that comes to mind that is probably extraneous is that: When compared to the other 2 sizes, the 10/12mm would have less (Marginal) Delta T as the tubes with the larger wall.  My theory behind this (Which I have one as well that counters my first theory): "The more surface area there is, the better the dissipation is"; with that in mind, wouldn't that be the same for the walls of the tubing?  The thicker the wall, the more surface area the heat has to dissipate?  OR, is thinner better because there isn't as much surface area to retain the heat, which results positively for the coolant in that if the walls were thicker, it would retain the heat raising the temperature of the coolant closer to that of the walls if the coolant is lower.  But then again, and now I'm just speaking out loudly here: Would that even matter because the coolant is going to be the same (I'm using that very loosely) temperature coming out of say the CPU block (ie hotter) before going into the radiator, which is then cooled down.  Now everything is starting to cancel itself out because now I'm back to supporting my original theory for the reason that: If the temperature of the coolant is lower, the better the cooling performance will be going into the rad?...  (Most of that paragraph can probably be ignored.  My brain was just fighting with itself.  Also, what are the odds of the temperature of the coolant coming out of the CPU block being colder than that of the walls..)

 

EK-HD Tube 10/14mm:

With everything said above, I started to lean more towards this size of tubing mainly for the reason I stated above about the bending.  If someone could clarify this a bit for me, my choice may change back.

 

EK-HD Tube 12/16mm:

These tubes are just going to be way too big for my build and being that the ID is 12 and the G1/4 is about ~9 - 10mm, I feel like that may hurt the flow a bit because there will be some extra room in the tube for the water to move around.

 

Concerns about bending:

EKWB has these modulus for bending their tubes: EK-Loop Modulus Hard Tube Bending Tool

This tool just doesn't seem ideal for bending tubes as opposed to something offered by Thermaltake, in particular Pacific Hard Tube Bending Kit.  The latter just seems more intuitive as there is no spot really for error:  You heat the tube and bend it over the template, whereas the former you need to bend the acrylic then put it into the mold.  It just seems like there is too much room for something to go wrong.  If someone could reassure me and possibly explain that I have nothing to worry in that sense, that would be great because it is actually this reason that I may ultimately choose the 12/16mm size tubing only because of Thermaltakes tool kit that they provide.  If someone knows of another tool kit that is well known and of good quality and is made for 10/4mm, that would probably be even better.

 

Once again, I do apologize for how long it took me to type this out in a coherent manor, but hopefully I'm not too late and can still get some good feedback on what to do.

 

I'm sure more will pop up as I plan along, and it would be great if you guys could stay and tag along for this adventure.  I know I'm going to need a lot of help.

 

Update:

So I ended up pulling the trigger and I went ahead and ordered these parts.  Please leave me your response, input opinion on my choices and if there is anything I need to worry about.

 

 

To bend the Acrylic, I went with this Heat Gun.

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What GPU (just curious) :)

Current in process build: Project Odyssey - Build Logs - Linus Tech Tips

Workstation Laptop: Dell Precision 7540, Xeon E-2276M, 32gb DDR4, Quadro T2000 GPU, 4k display

Ryzen Rig 3: ASRock B450m Pro4, Ryzen 5 3600, ARESGAME River 5 CPU cooler in push/pull, EVGA RTX 2060 KO, 16gb (2x8) 3600mhz TeamGroup T-Force RAM, ARESGAME AGV750w PSU, 1tb WD Black SN750 NVMe Win 10 boot drive, 3tb Hitachi 7200 RPM HDD, Fractal Design Focus G Mini custom painted.  Lenovo 27" 1080p 60hz placeholder monitor, generic mouse, generic keyboard.  Still a work in progress

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 video card benchmark result - AMD Ryzen 5 3600,ASRock B450M Pro4 (3dmark.com)

Ryzen Rig 2: ASrock B450 Pro4, Ryzen 7 1700 @ 4.2ghz all core 1.4vCore, AMD R9 Fury X w/ Swiftech KOMODO waterblock, Custom Loop 2x240mm + 1x120mm radiators in push/pull 16gb (2x8) 3600mhz V-Color Skywalker (or 4x8gb DDR4 2666mhz for large tasks), Corsair HX850 PSU, 250gb Samsun 960 EVO NVMe Win 10 boot drive, 500gb Samsung 840 EVO SSD, 512GB TeamGroup MP30 M.2 SATA III SSD, SuperTalent 512gb SATA III SSD, CoolerMaster HAF XM Case.  Zalman K600S keyboard, Zalman ZM-GM1 mouse, Viotek GN24C 24" 1080p 144hz curved and Hannspree HF207 as 2nd monitor

https://www.3dmark.com/3dm/37004594?

Ryzen Rig 1: ASUS B350-PRIME ATX, Ryzen 7 1700, Sapphire R9 Fury Tri-X Nitro 4gb HBM, 16gb (2x8) 3200mhz V-Color Skywalker, ANTEC Earthwatts 750w PSU, MasterLiquid Lite 120 AIO cooler in Push/Pull config as rear exhaust, 250gb Samsung 850 Evo SSD, Patriot Burst 240gb SSD, Cougar MX330-X Case.  Zalman K600S keyboard, Zalman ZM-GM1 mouse, Acer XF270HU 2560x1440 144hz IPS monitor

https://www.3dmark.com/3dm/37628874?

Dell OptiPlex 3040 MFF: Dell 0MGK50 A02, i3-6100T, 2x4gb DDR3 1600, Team Group 120gb SSD, 500gb Seagate 7mm HDD attached storage, Windows 10 Pro, Logitech K400+, USB Wifi adapter all vesa mounted to the back of a 37" 1080p TV 

Linux Box: Toshiba Laptop, i7 620M, NVS graphics, 4gb ram tinker toy at the moment.  Running Manjaro XFCE at the moment.

Home Security: ZOSI 8 channel CCTV (4 used at this time, 1080p) DVR H.265+, 3tb HGST Enterprise HDD, ASUS monitor for display

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7 minutes ago, Tristerin said:

What GPU (just curious) :)

Asus Strix 1080Ti.  Only because I'm waiting for Nvidia Ampere.

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It just doesn't seem right to have to bend the tube first, then put it into the mold.

You heat it with a heat gun to make it bend then place it in the mold and allow it to cool for the bend to take place.  It doesn't take long to cool down and should mold just fine.

 

I did watch someone on YT use lego's as a mold but I haven't tried it myself.

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2 hours ago, Wizwerd said:

You heat it with a heat gun to make it bend then place it in the mold and allow it to cool for the bend to take place.  It doesn't take long to cool down and should mold just fine.

 

I did watch someone on YT use lego's as a mold but I haven't tried it myself.

I've updated the thread listing some of my concerns about the tool.

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15 minutes ago, Cmptr said:

I've updated the thread listing some of my concerns about the tool.

I will also writ4e more fully later, but htere is no performance difference between the tubing diameter. Just a matter of how you like the look of the tubing.

 

16 minutes ago, Cmptr said:

I've updated the thread listing some of my concerns about the tool.

 

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30 minutes ago, For Science! said:

I will also writ4e more fully later, but htere is no performance difference between the tubing diameter. Just a matter of how you like the look of the tubing.

 

 

Thank you!  I will be looking forward to your full response later!

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6 hours ago, Cmptr said:

 

I'm all for people to take the dive to the deep end and if they intend on ever doing hardline just to do hardline from the start. The difference between hardline and soft tubing is so large that no number of softline builds will prepare you to do hardline. Of course you will also need to buy 2 sets of fittings if you start with soft tubing which is a waste and should be dedicated to more hardline tubing so that you have room for error.

 

Acrylic does not contribute in any significant manner (and honestly, even if it was copper tubing) the amount of surface area offered by a cylinder is a non-factor for cooling. Therefore any consideration for tubing size for cooling benefits can be thrown out.

 

In terms of achieving bends, either thickness is fine. I do indeed find that it is easier to screw up the thinner 10/12 tubing, but the flip side is that it is easier to bend and so the process is faster when you get used to it. But the bigger factor is how the runs look like in the end so if you like the look of thicker tubes just go for it. For smaller systems where you need to do tighter bends, I think the 10/12 mm will work in your favor.

 

As for bending, I pre-date the popularity of bending kits and so do everything by hand, maybe using the corner of my table as an occasional guide for 90 degrees.  Therefore I don't have an opinion about bending kits apart from the opinion that I don't need them myself.

 

12 mm in mini-ITX case (Ncase M1)

20171205_194053.jpg.4e63c42dea99df4a1b125fcf49975d17.jpg

 

16 mm tubing in a mid-tower (Meshify C)

 

IMG_2941-2945_02.jpg.6491189f827965f025800f0680aab9c2.jpgIMG_0237.JPG.fda79c2299145b28d6338a1e1f533478.JPG

 

16 mm tubing in a full-tower (Obsidian 900D)

 

IMG_0265-0267_01.jpg.d24ffba60d09d06b74eda909244c3aa6.jpg

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5 hours ago, For Science! said:

I'm all for people to take the dive to the deep end and if they intend on ever doing hardline just to do hardline from the start. The difference between hardline and soft tubing is so large that no number of softline builds will prepare you to do hardline. Of course you will also need to buy 2 sets of fittings if you start with soft tubing which is a waste and should be dedicated to more hardline tubing so that you have room for error.

 

Acrylic does not contribute in any significant manner (and honestly, even if it was copper tubing) the amount of surface area offered by a cylinder is a non-factor for cooling. Therefore any consideration for tubing size for cooling benefits can be thrown out.

 

In terms of achieving bends, either thickness is fine. I do indeed find that it is easier to screw up the thinner 10/12 tubing, but the flip side is that it is easier to bend and so the process is faster when you get used to it. But the bigger factor is how the runs look like in the end so if you like the look of thicker tubes just go for it. For smaller systems where you need to do tighter bends, I think the 10/12 mm will work in your favor.

 

As for bending, I pre-date the popularity of bending kits and so do everything by hand, maybe using the corner of my table as an occasional guide for 90 degrees.  Therefore I don't have an opinion about bending kits apart from the opinion that I don't need them myself.

 

12 mm in mini-ITX case (Ncase M1)

20171205_194053.jpg.4e63c42dea99df4a1b125fcf49975d17.jpg

 

16 mm tubing in a mid-tower (Meshify C)

 

IMG_2941-2945_02.jpg.6491189f827965f025800f0680aab9c2.jpgIMG_0237.JPG.fda79c2299145b28d6338a1e1f533478.JPG

 

16 mm tubing in a full-tower (Obsidian 900D)

 

IMG_0265-0267_01.jpg.d24ffba60d09d06b74eda909244c3aa6.jpg

These are very beautiful builds.  

 

I have a few questions: Wont bending by freehand, and in your case using your table to get a 90 Degree bend, wont it flatten the tube a bit due to being pressed against or even touching the table?  Or will that not happen because the acrylic shouldn't be heated to that point?

 

If I do choose to go with the 10/12, after bending and letting it cool, is it okay to poor water through the tube to see if the tube is still intact?  Or will that possibly degrade the quality of the acrylic when I use the tube for the loop and poor distilled water through the loop?

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Just now, Cmptr said:

These are very beautiful builds.  

 

I have a few questions: Wont bending by freehand, and in your case using your table to get a 90 Degree bend, wont it flatten the tube a bit due to being pressed against or even touching the table?  Or will that not happen because the acrylic shouldn't be heated to that point?

 

If I do choose to go with the 10/12, after bending and letting it cool, is it okay to poor water through the tube to see if the tube is still intact?  Or will that possibly degrade the quality of the acrylic when I use the tube for the loop and poor distilled water through the loop?

Its fine as i dont press it against the table, and honestly its only the small portion that is heated and as you say its not really so hot by that point

 

Yes , after the tubing is cool it is completely fine to wash it with tap water. I do this all the time since i use dish soap to make the silicon insert easier to insert. After i finalize all the bends i re-rinse everything with distilled water to wash out any residual ions

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5 minutes ago, Cmptr said:

@For Science! What heatgun do you recommend and what temperature would you say is best to heat the 10/12mm acrylic?

 

So I think I am going to go with the modulus ekwb offers, EK-HD Tube DIY Kit and EK-HD Tube Reamer.  Do you think these should be sufficient?

Any heat gun that can be laid flat on the table with the heating element pointing upwards is fine. I think mine was a cotech one just because it was available for purchase and could stand

 

As for the temperature i normally just set my heat gun to "high" when starting from cold and after the first bend set the heat gun to "medium". No exact temps i just adjust my height af which i hold the tubing relative to the heat gun.

 

The kit and reamer should work fine as long as you also use tubing from EK.

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If you have to deal with 90 degree bends, there are kits that you can buy when those already done and just cut it to length.  I would also say that 16mm is going to look fine in an O11 Dynamic.  Here is soft tubing in that size and you can see that it doesn't really take up much room.  Also, the force that the pump applies to the fluid keeps the tubing completely full.  You will not see any type of air once bled.

 

IMG_6390.thumb.jpg.a558c4ff97e6f70d46f05d051f1f54b5.jpg

Gaming - AMD TR 3970X | ASUS ROG Zenith Extreme II | G.SKILL Neo 3600 64GB | Zotac Nvidia 2080 Ti AMP | 2x Sabarent 1TB NVMe | Samsung 860 EVO 1TB SSD | Phanteks Enthoo 719 | Seasonic Prime Ultra Platinum 1000w | Corsair K70 RGB Lux | Corsiar M65 | 2x ASUS Rog PG279Q | BenQ EW3270U | Windows 10 Pro | EKWB Custom loop

ITX - Intel i7-10700k | Asus ROG Z490-I Gaming | G.SKILL TridentZ RGB 3200 32GB | EVGA 2080 Super| Samsung 970 Evo 1TB | Samsung 860 Evo 1TB SSD | NZXT H1| Windows 10 Pro

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19 hours ago, Xplo1t said:

If you have to deal with 90 degree bends, there are kits that you can buy when those already done and just cut it to length.  I would also say that 16mm is going to look fine in an O11 Dynamic.  Here is soft tubing in that size and you can see that it doesn't really take up much room.  Also, the force that the pump applies to the fluid keeps the tubing completely full.  You will not see any type of air once bled.

 

IMG_6390.thumb.jpg.a558c4ff97e6f70d46f05d051f1f54b5.jpg

I saw that some sites were offering pre-bent tubes, I however did not see any on ekwb.

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EK doesn't sell them, but I believe Alphacool does and they would be just as good.

Gaming - AMD TR 3970X | ASUS ROG Zenith Extreme II | G.SKILL Neo 3600 64GB | Zotac Nvidia 2080 Ti AMP | 2x Sabarent 1TB NVMe | Samsung 860 EVO 1TB SSD | Phanteks Enthoo 719 | Seasonic Prime Ultra Platinum 1000w | Corsair K70 RGB Lux | Corsiar M65 | 2x ASUS Rog PG279Q | BenQ EW3270U | Windows 10 Pro | EKWB Custom loop

ITX - Intel i7-10700k | Asus ROG Z490-I Gaming | G.SKILL TridentZ RGB 3200 32GB | EVGA 2080 Super| Samsung 970 Evo 1TB | Samsung 860 Evo 1TB SSD | NZXT H1| Windows 10 Pro

HTPC - Intel i9-9900k | Asus ROG Maximus XI Code | G.SKILL TridentZ RGB 3200 32GB | EVGA 1070 | Samsung 970 1TB | WD Blue 1TB SSD | NZXT H700  | EVGA G3 1000W | Corsair H150i | Windows 10 Pro

Servers - SuperMicro 846 | 2x 2695L V2 | 128GB | Chelsio 10Gbe | Chelsio 40Gbe | 24 x 6TB | FreeNas - SuperMicro 826 | 2 x 2695L | 128GB | Chelsio 10Gbe | Chelsio 40Gbe | 8 x 10TB | 847 24 x 1TB SSD | Windows Server 2019

Work - Dell XPS 15 9560 | i7-7700HQ | 32 GB RAM | 1TB NVMe | 4k dsiplay

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