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UPS Voltage Help Needed

Boomwebsearch
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I have a CyberPower LX1500GU which I have connected the computer to using the included USB cable and when I installed the software it showed this screen for the voltages. The screenshot contains the default settings, I want to change the below setting to 103 and the above setting to 138 although am not sure what they mean when they use the term "intervene", do they mean that it will use its transformer or the battery or a combination of both?

Screenshot of Default UPS Voltage Intervene Settings for LX1500GU.PNG

Hope this information post was helpful  ?,

        @Boomwebsearch 

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Just now, Boomwebsearch said:

I have a CyberPower LX1500GU which I have connected the computer to using the included USB cable and when I installed the software it showed this screen for the voltages. The screenshot contains the default settings, I want to change the below setting to 103 and the above setting to 138 although am not sure what they mean when they use the term "intervene", do they mean that it will use its transformer or the battery or a combination of both?

Essentially your baseline voltage will be 120V this is the +/- amount you want to allow before it kciks into battery backup mode, if you have large variations of voltage in your area some will want to increase that range so it doesn't always jump on and off constantly and instead the AVR will take care of the small changes in voltage. 

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2 minutes ago, W-L said:

if you have large variations of voltage in your area some will want to increase that range so it doesn't always jump on and off constantly and instead the AVR will take care of the small changes in voltage. 

Okay, we don't get much fluctuations in our voltage and I would prefer more if it protected the equipment (even if going onto its battery) although, I am not really sure what the AVR would do. The person from Best Buy said that it would manage the voltage when it spikes or drops below a certain threshold, if there is some power and the unit could use its transformer, why would going onto the battery for backup be needed? I also ran a self-test now and was really surprised at how much noise the machine made (even if not considering the beeping), I was told that this one had no fan or other cooling solution although I think that the electrical noise from this modified sine-wave unit is quite too much and is also very loud and annoying. The LCD sometimes displays up-to 2 hours of run time and I can't have it making so much noise when switching onto battery. I would turn off my computer and the server which is connected to it during an extended power outage (when the screenshot was taken it was with my computer and NAS on) to maximize my run-time, although am concerned about the electrical noise and wonder if it would lower with the load being lowered (if it was only to power a router and a modem) to still have internet during an outage. Would the pure sine wave units make less noise, if this one still makes a lot of noise when the load will be lowered I think I may need to look for a different option? Would really prefer not having a fan although if I choose a non-pure sine wave one with a fan would the noise outputted be more or less?   Also, looking on the front of the unit below the LCD and the "DISPLAY" button there are 2 USB ports, are those protected against surges and will those run off of battery power?

 

Thanks in advance,   @Boomwebsearch

Hope this information post was helpful  ?,

        @Boomwebsearch 

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Just now, Boomwebsearch said:

-SNIP-

The AVR is the auto voltage regulation so if the voltage changes by a certain degree either high or low there is a transformer with multiple taps that will help bring it back to the set 120V. The reason why you may want to use battery backup instead is if you have sensitve equipment to immediately get it off potentially questionable power and to prevent the UPS unit from jumping on battery backup and line voltage constantly if it's right at that threshold. 

 

For electrical noise it's normal with any UPS since you are converting DC to AC and then back to DC in the PSU of the PC. Modified sinewave units will exhibit more noise than say pure sinewave units as the PSU has to accommodate for the imperfect sinewave and tries to somewhat compensate for it. Certain PSU's will have more noise than others I've had units where there is little noise and one's where it's a very loud electrical buzz. 

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53 minutes ago, W-L said:

The AVR is the auto voltage regulation so if the voltage changes by a certain degree either high or low there is a transformer with multiple taps that will help bring it back to the set 120V. The reason why you may want to use battery backup instead is if you have sensitve equipment to immediately get it off potentially questionable power and to prevent the UPS unit from jumping on battery backup and line voltage constantly if it's right at that threshold. 

CyberPower has some patented "GreenPower UPS" technology which allows for clean power to bypass the transformer which saves energy costs associated with the UPS unit. This means that apparently the electricity which is clean can somehow jump the transformer and directly go to your equipment. Is this meaning that there would be some delay associated with the transformer being engaged when it would be needed and some excess high voltage going to the connected equipment? Isn't the line-interactive technology always supposed to deliver clean set 120V power to the connected devices and when it decides to transfer using the voltage setting threshold set, would it drain its entire battery and then turn off or go back to utility power? 

Hope this information post was helpful  ?,

        @Boomwebsearch 

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10 minutes ago, Boomwebsearch said:

CyberPower has some patented "GreenPower UPS" technology which allows for clean power to bypass the transformer which saves energy costs associated with the UPS unit. This means that apparently the electricity which is clean can somehow jump the transformer and directly go to your equipment. Is this meaning that there would be some delay associated with the transformer being engaged when it would be needed and some excess high voltage going to the connected equipment? Isn't the line-interactive technology always supposed to deliver clean set 120V power to the connected devices and when it decides to transfer using the voltage setting threshold set, would it drain its entire battery and then turn off or go back to utility power? 

The AVR is for minor voltage changes due to line loads say upstream where a high power draw and can cause voltage droop, this doesn't correct for poor quality or noisy power which is also something the unit monitors constantly. The diagram below illustrates this well, the AVR is only for voltage and doesn't use any battery backup at all. 

 

As for transformer if you are referring to then DC to AC converter for the battery backup the line interactive UPS units only kick in when there is say a power outage or poor quality power is detected such as a brown out. There is a split second that it takes usually around 10 - 20ms  (on good units) for the battery backup to be engaged and one of the downsides of line interactive units as some highly sensitive equipment will not like that small blip when the change over happens; that's when on-line UPS come into play but that's a different subject in itself. In normal operation all regular line interactive UPS will just run off of mains power from the wall unit something is detected. 

Image result for ups diagram with AVR

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