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Overclocking Question (CPU)

spree
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Hi everyone,

 

I was wondering what is the differance between overclocking the "normal" way, aka just setting the clock ratio higher, vs using intels "autoboost" feature that I have on my motherboard?

 

-Thanks

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Intels Turbo Boost is automatically enabled which when the CPU is in demand will clock it up to a higher frequency. Whilst the other you manually set.

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Just now, TheWiseGuy said:

Intels Turbo Boost is automatically enabled which when the CPU is in demand will clock it up to a higher frequency. Whilst the other you manually set.

I understand that. But why would you manually OC when you can allow the CPU to automatically overclock whenever the temps allow it?

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Just now, spree said:

I understand that. But why would you manually OC when you can allow the CPU to automatically overclock whenever the temps allow it?

Turbo boost only does it within a preset turbo frequency. My CPU for example, turbos to 3.5GHz. However, I can overclock even farther then that.

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Just now, TheWiseGuy said:

Turbo boost only does it within a preset turbo frequency. My CPU for example, turbos to 3.5GHz. However, I can overclock even farther then that.

I can manually set what I want the turbo boost to boost up to. For example, I could probably easily get 4.8ghz out of my i7 7700k if I set it manually. But I'm pretty sure I can get the turbo boost to boost all of my cores up to that as well.

 

I'm sorry if my question is a bit messy.

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1 minute ago, spree said:

.

You want to set personalized multipliers to the turbo boost table instead of setting a single multipler? Like 1 core = 50 / 2 cores = 49 / 3 cores = 49 / 4 cores = 48 and such?

 

I mean you obviously can but I don't see much gain in doing so.

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1 minute ago, spree said:

I can manually set what I want the turbo boost to boost up to. For example, I could probably easily get 4.8ghz out of my i7 7700k if I set it manually. But I'm pretty sure I can get the turbo boost to boost all of my cores up to that as well.

 

I'm sorry if my question is a bit messy.

"Turbo Boost" is a feature that Intel CPU's have that allows all or some of the cores to reach a higher frequency than their base clocks. This turbo feature is typically quite conservative, and is defined by Intel. You can view that information here:https://ark.intel.com/

 

Overclocking on the other hand, allows you to push further than that turbo boost limit defined by Intel. You are on your own however as Intel no longer guarentees that whatever you overclock to will be stable and within safe operating temperatures and voltages. 

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1 minute ago, Airdragonz said:

"Turbo Boost" is a feature that Intel CPU's have that allows all or some of the cores to reach a higher frequency than their base clocks. This turbo feature is typically quite conservative, and is defined by Intel. You can view that information here:https://ark.intel.com/

 

Overclocking on the other hand, allows you to push further than that turbo boost limit defined by Intel. You are on your own however as Intel no longer guarentees that whatever you overclock to will be stable and within safe operating temperatures and voltages. 

Okay, so my question is, what is the differance between setting the turbo boost, across all cores at say 4.8 ghz

and setting it manually at 4.8ghz?

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Just now, spree said:

Okay, so my question is, what is the differance between setting the turbo boost, across all cores at say 4.8 ghz

and setting it manually at 4.8ghz?

You can't set the turbo boost to 4.8ghz yourself. Your CPU clocks itself automatically, and within the limits maximum defined by Intel. 

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1 minute ago, spree said:

Okay, so my question is, what is the differance between setting the turbo boost, across all cores at say 4.8 ghz

and setting it manually at 4.8ghz?

Turbo Boost follows a stock multiplier table for cores in usage, the i7 7700K Turbo boost is as follow:

1 core = 45 multiplier (45x 100mhz BCLK = 4.5ghz)

2 cores = 44 multiplier (44x 100mhz BCLK = 4.4ghz)

3 cores = 43 multiplier (43x 100 BCLK = 4.3ghz)

4 cores = 43 multiplier (43x 100BCLK = 4.3ghz)

This is the stock setting in EVERY SINGLE i7 7700K, which is what the Turbo Boost will do if temperature and power are sufficient to do so.

 

Meaning that the maximum frequency for All cores that the Turbo boost can do is 4.3ghz.

 

If you want more like you said you want 4.8ghz you have to set manually the multiplier you want, which in this case is 48, you can still break it down by cores or you can just do 48x all cores and all call it a day.

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CPU: Intel Core i7 8700 @4.45ghz |~| Cooling: Cooler Master Hyper 212X |~| MOBO: Gigabyte Z370M D3H mATX|~| RAM: 16gb DDR4 3333mhzCL16 G.Skill Trident Z |~| GPU: nVidia Founders Edition GTX 1080 Ti |~| PSU: Corsair TX650M 80Plus Gold |~| Boot:  SSD WD Green M.2 2280 240GB |~| Storage: 1x3TB HDD 7200rpm Seagate Barracuda + SanDisk Ultra 3D 1TB |~| Case: Fractal Design Meshify C Mini |~| Display: Toshiba UL7A 4K/60hz |~| OS: Windows 10 Pro.

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CPU: Intel Core i7 10700KF @ 5.0Ghz (5.1Ghz 4-core) |~| Cooling: bq! Dark Rock 4 Pro |~| MOBO: Gigabyte Z490 UD |~| RAM: 32G Kingston HyperX @ 2666Mhz CL13 |~| GPU: AMD Radeon RX 6800 (Reference) |~| PSU: Corsair HX1000 80+ Platinum |~| Windows Boot Drive: 2x 512GB (1TB total) Plextor SATA SSD (RAID0 volume) |~| Linux Boot Drive: 500GB Kingston A2000 |~| Storage: 4TB WD Black HDD |~| Case: Cooler Master Silencio S600 |~| Display 1 (leftmost): Eizo (unknown model) 1920x1080 IPS @ 60Hz|~| Display 2 (center): BenQ ZOWIE XL2540 1920x1080 TN @ 240Hz |~| Display 3 (rightmost): Wacom Cintiq Pro 24 3840x2160 IPS @ 60Hz 10-bit |~| OS: Windows 10 Pro (games / art) + Linux (distro: NixOS; programming and daily driver)
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6 minutes ago, spree said:

Okay, so my question is, what is the differance between setting the turbo boost, across all cores at say 4.8 ghz

and setting it manually at 4.8ghz?

Setting turbo boost isn't what you mean. Turbo boost can't be changed. Overclock replaces turbo.

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1 minute ago, Princess Cadence said:

Turbo Boost follows a stock multiplier table for cores in usage, the i7 7700K Turbo boost is as follow:

1 core = 45 multiplier (45x 100mhz BCLK = 4.5ghz)

2 cores = 44 multiplier (44x 100mhz BCLK = 4.4ghz)

3 cores = 43 multiplier (43x 100 BCLK = 4.3ghz)

4 cores = 43 multiplier (43x 100BCLK = 4.3ghz)

This is the stock setting in EVERY SINGLE i7 7700K, which is what the Turbo Boost will do if temperature and power are sufficient to do so.

 

Meaning that the maximum frequency for All cores that the Turbo boost can do is 4.3ghz.

 

If you want more like you said you want 4.8ghz you have to set manually the multiplier you want, which in this case is 48, you can still break it down by cores or you can just do 48x all cores and all call it a day.

Oh okay, thank you very much!

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1 minute ago, fasauceome said:

Setting turbo boost isn't what you mean. Turbo boost can't be changed. Overclock replaces turbo.

I was able to change it in bios so it looked like turbo boost was at 4.8ghz. But judging from what you have said here, I wasn't ACTUALLY able to change the turbo boost to 4.8ghz.

 

Thanks for the information.

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10 minutes ago, Princess Cadence said:

Turbo Boost follows a stock multiplier table for cores in usage, the i7 7700K Turbo boost is as follow:

1 core = 45 multiplier (45x 100mhz BCLK = 4.5ghz)

2 cores = 44 multiplier (44x 100mhz BCLK = 4.4ghz)

3 cores = 43 multiplier (43x 100 BCLK = 4.3ghz)

4 cores = 43 multiplier (43x 100BCLK = 4.3ghz)

This is the stock setting in EVERY SINGLE i7 7700K, which is what the Turbo Boost will do if temperature and power are sufficient to do so.

 

Meaning that the maximum frequency for All cores that the Turbo boost can do is 4.3ghz.

 

If you want more like you said you want 4.8ghz you have to set manually the multiplier you want, which in this case is 48, you can still break it down by cores or you can just do 48x all cores and all call it a day.

So if I wanted to go to 4.8ghz and doing it manually, should I disable turbo boost then? Or can it be enabled?

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You can't change Turbo Boost. That's set by Intel. Overclocking is making the CPU clock higher than Turbo speeds given that you have the cooler to dissipate the heat, silicon lottery and enough voltage.

hi.

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6 minutes ago, AskTJ said:

You can't change Turbo Boost. That's set by Intel. Overclocking is making the CPU clock higher than Turbo speeds given that you have the cooler to dissipate the heat, silicon lottery and enough voltage.

If I decide to overclock manually, should I disable the turbo boost? Or can I leave it on?

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36 minutes ago, spree said:

If I decide to overclock manually, should I disable the turbo boost? Or can I leave it on?

It won't make a difference if left on.

hi.

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On 12/6/2018 at 2:59 AM, fasauceome said:

Setting turbo boost isn't what you mean. Turbo boost can't be changed. Overclock replaces turbo.

So I've done some more testing, and I can indeed change the turbo boost and it works like an overclock.

 

I simply pressed the "+" key and it went up from 43 to 45 in the turbo boost setting. And after running cinabench and checking my ghz, it was indeed at 4.5ghz instead of 4.3ghz.

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On 12/6/2018 at 2:57 AM, Princess Cadence said:

Turbo Boost follows a stock multiplier table for cores in usage, the i7 7700K Turbo boost is as follow:

1 core = 45 multiplier (45x 100mhz BCLK = 4.5ghz)

2 cores = 44 multiplier (44x 100mhz BCLK = 4.4ghz)

3 cores = 43 multiplier (43x 100 BCLK = 4.3ghz)

4 cores = 43 multiplier (43x 100BCLK = 4.3ghz)

This is the stock setting in EVERY SINGLE i7 7700K, which is what the Turbo Boost will do if temperature and power are sufficient to do so.

 

Meaning that the maximum frequency for All cores that the Turbo boost can do is 4.3ghz.

 

If you want more like you said you want 4.8ghz you have to set manually the multiplier you want, which in this case is 48, you can still break it down by cores or you can just do 48x all cores and all call it a day.

Are you saying I can use turbo boost and manually set that to 4.8ghz, or use the "normal" way of overclocking?

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On 12/6/2018 at 2:38 AM, spree said:

Hi everyone,

 

I was wondering what is the differance between overclocking the "normal" way, aka just setting the clock ratio higher, vs using intels "autoboost" feature that I have on my motherboard?

 

-Thanks

What mobo du you have?

Could you send a photo of the tool?

Some mainboards have a Feature which overclocks your cpu automaticly.

In that case we would need more info on your mainboard, cooling and powersupply

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3 hours ago, spree said:

Are you saying I can use turbo boost and manually set that to 4.8ghz, or use the "normal" way of overclocking?

No, you either overclock or you don't, turbo boost is a stock setting.

 

What I thought you meant was that you wanted different clocks depending how many cores are used like Turbo Boost does which is possible...

 

The moment you overclock or downclock or set any custom frequency at all there is NO MORE Turbo Boost as it's a stock setting.

 

Turbo Boost is just a fancy name to a table of multipliers that you can do yourself.

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CPU: Intel Core i7 8700 @4.45ghz |~| Cooling: Cooler Master Hyper 212X |~| MOBO: Gigabyte Z370M D3H mATX|~| RAM: 16gb DDR4 3333mhzCL16 G.Skill Trident Z |~| GPU: nVidia Founders Edition GTX 1080 Ti |~| PSU: Corsair TX650M 80Plus Gold |~| Boot:  SSD WD Green M.2 2280 240GB |~| Storage: 1x3TB HDD 7200rpm Seagate Barracuda + SanDisk Ultra 3D 1TB |~| Case: Fractal Design Meshify C Mini |~| Display: Toshiba UL7A 4K/60hz |~| OS: Windows 10 Pro.

Luna, the temporary Desktop:

CPU: Intel Core i7 10700KF @ 5.0Ghz (5.1Ghz 4-core) |~| Cooling: bq! Dark Rock 4 Pro |~| MOBO: Gigabyte Z490 UD |~| RAM: 32G Kingston HyperX @ 2666Mhz CL13 |~| GPU: AMD Radeon RX 6800 (Reference) |~| PSU: Corsair HX1000 80+ Platinum |~| Windows Boot Drive: 2x 512GB (1TB total) Plextor SATA SSD (RAID0 volume) |~| Linux Boot Drive: 500GB Kingston A2000 |~| Storage: 4TB WD Black HDD |~| Case: Cooler Master Silencio S600 |~| Display 1 (leftmost): Eizo (unknown model) 1920x1080 IPS @ 60Hz|~| Display 2 (center): BenQ ZOWIE XL2540 1920x1080 TN @ 240Hz |~| Display 3 (rightmost): Wacom Cintiq Pro 24 3840x2160 IPS @ 60Hz 10-bit |~| OS: Windows 10 Pro (games / art) + Linux (distro: NixOS; programming and daily driver)
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18 hours ago, Princess Cadence said:

No, you either overclock or you don't, turbo boost is a stock setting.

 

What I thought you meant was that you wanted different clocks depending how many cores are used like Turbo Boost does which is possible...

 

The moment you overclock or downclock or set any custom frequency at all there is NO MORE Turbo Boost as it's a stock setting.

 

Turbo Boost is just a fancy name to a table of multipliers that you can do yourself.

Okay. I know I'm being really annoying right now, but I just can't seem to get this through my mind.

If I set the turbo boost on all 4 cores to "48" and I run a CPU stress test, I can see that my CPU is indeed at 4.8ghz, and not 4.3ghz as it would boost up to before touching the turbo boost.

 

So that would make this not a stock setting, or am I a complete retard? 

 

I'm assuming it's still better to just set a voltage manually, and overclock manually. But I'm still confused if the turbo boost can indeed work as an overclock or not.

 

Thanks for your help so far.

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8 hours ago, spree said:

, or am I a complete retard? 

I mean how many more people need to say that you don't ever change the turbo boost, it's just a stock setting that gets canceled the second you start playing with the multipliers yourself.

 

Go watch some youtube videos on overclock, try finding one that "overclocks through turbo boost" and there's your answer.

 

While you're at it do try finding videos explaning the turbo boost again, it's just a marketing name for the frequency your CPU operates out of stock, when you overclock there is no more turbo boost.

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CPU: Intel Core i7 8700 @4.45ghz |~| Cooling: Cooler Master Hyper 212X |~| MOBO: Gigabyte Z370M D3H mATX|~| RAM: 16gb DDR4 3333mhzCL16 G.Skill Trident Z |~| GPU: nVidia Founders Edition GTX 1080 Ti |~| PSU: Corsair TX650M 80Plus Gold |~| Boot:  SSD WD Green M.2 2280 240GB |~| Storage: 1x3TB HDD 7200rpm Seagate Barracuda + SanDisk Ultra 3D 1TB |~| Case: Fractal Design Meshify C Mini |~| Display: Toshiba UL7A 4K/60hz |~| OS: Windows 10 Pro.

Luna, the temporary Desktop:

CPU: Intel Core i7 10700KF @ 5.0Ghz (5.1Ghz 4-core) |~| Cooling: bq! Dark Rock 4 Pro |~| MOBO: Gigabyte Z490 UD |~| RAM: 32G Kingston HyperX @ 2666Mhz CL13 |~| GPU: AMD Radeon RX 6800 (Reference) |~| PSU: Corsair HX1000 80+ Platinum |~| Windows Boot Drive: 2x 512GB (1TB total) Plextor SATA SSD (RAID0 volume) |~| Linux Boot Drive: 500GB Kingston A2000 |~| Storage: 4TB WD Black HDD |~| Case: Cooler Master Silencio S600 |~| Display 1 (leftmost): Eizo (unknown model) 1920x1080 IPS @ 60Hz|~| Display 2 (center): BenQ ZOWIE XL2540 1920x1080 TN @ 240Hz |~| Display 3 (rightmost): Wacom Cintiq Pro 24 3840x2160 IPS @ 60Hz 10-bit |~| OS: Windows 10 Pro (games / art) + Linux (distro: NixOS; programming and daily driver)
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13 hours ago, Princess Cadence said:

I mean how many more people need to say that you don't ever change the turbo boost, it's just a stock setting that gets canceled the second you start playing with the multipliers yourself.

 

Go watch some youtube videos on overclock, try finding one that "overclocks through turbo boost" and there's your answer.

 

While you're at it do try finding videos explaning the turbo boost again, it's just a marketing name for the frequency your CPU operates out of stock, when you overclock there is no more turbo boost.

The only reason why I keep asking is because what you're saying doesn't make any sense. "it's just a stock setting that gets canceled the second you start playing with the multipliers yourself." but I just told you that I can exit the bios with indeed the changes that I've made to the turbo boost.

 

But whatever, you dont seem to be able to explain it further. I will do as you say and find someone else on youtube to explain it.

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