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Senenter

Corsair watercooling build

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Hi all!

 

So i am looking to watercool my entire system with the hydro X series components from corsair. This will be the first time watercooling my system so i am looking for some guidance and tips as well as recommendations.

I have to say beforehand that i am not looking to spend insane amounts of money on this, though i am not strictly on a budget. I don't want to spend too much money. I know the Hydro X series is fairly well priced and it is not like i am trying to build the most exotic system. Like i said, it is my first attempt at this.

For reference, this is my build as of this moment: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/hyNp4n

 

I would like to go with a single triple radiator set-up, the components i have on my wish list right now are: 

Corsair Hydro XC7 RGB CPU Water Block

Corsair Hydro XD5 RGB Pump/Reservoir

 

Corsair Hydro XL5 Performance Coolant

 

Corsair Hydro X Series XG7 RGB 20-Series G

 

Corsair Hydro X Series XR7 360mm

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated, i only gonna buy the parts once i have a full picture of the cost and what i can expect from this build and what the best layout for my tubing is.

 

Thanks in advance!

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Given that you're new to an open loop, the best thing you're going to be able to do for yourself is start seeking out examples of loop layouts in your chassis.

Search engine of choice (I encourage  duckduckgo)
YouTube (since there is no readily viable alternative)

and
https://builds.gg/

 

Find a layout similar to what you're looking at, or a layout you like, and do your best to figure what types of fittings are needed, hardline or soft tubing, whichever you plan to build with. Keep in mind that water cooling isn't necessarily going to be cheap, $600 (~530) is not anywhere outside the realm of unrealistic for a complete build). AIO's are significantly more cost effective, especially given that you're only doing your CPU as of current (with a side note that a 360mm is overkill).


~Remember to quote posts to continue support on your thread~
-Don't be this kind of person-

CPU:  Intel  i7-4790k | RAM: 4x4GB G.Skill Ripjaws Z | Cooling: XSPC/EK/Bitspower loop | MOBO: MSI Z97-G45 | PSU: Seasonic Prime 750 Titanium  

SSD: 250GB Crucial MX200 (OS) | 1TB Crucial MX500 | Case: Phanteks Evolv X | GPU: EVGA GTX 1080 Ti FTW3 (with EK Block) | HDD: 1x Seagate Barracuda 2TB

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Posted · Original PosterOP
43 minutes ago, Semper said:

Given that you're new to an open loop, the best thing you're going to be able to do for yourself is start seeking out examples of loop layouts in your chassis.

Search engine of choice (I encourage  duckduckgo)
YouTube (since there is no readily viable alternative)

and
https://builds.gg/

 

Find a layout similar to what you're looking at, or a layout you like, and do your best to figure what types of fittings are needed, hardline or soft tubing, whichever you plan to build with. Keep in mind that water cooling isn't necessarily going to be cheap, $600 (~530) is not anywhere outside the realm of unrealistic for a complete build). AIO's are significantly more cost effective, especially given that you're only doing your CPU as of current (with a side note that a 360mm is overkill).

I was atleast planning on going soft-tube since i expect that to be a little bit easier to work with, and also not having to have buy as many fittings since as if i were to go with hard-line. Might it be a good idea to go with a building-kit aswell? so i atleast know i have the needed parts? Except for the GPU ofcourse, i saw some kits form EK including a res, pump, rad, and CPU block + tubing and fittings.

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16 minutes ago, Senenter said:

I was atleast planning on going soft-tube since i expect that to be a little bit easier to work with, and also not having to have buy as many fittings since as if i were to go with hard-line. Might it be a good idea to go with a building-kit aswell? so i atleast know i have the needed parts? Except for the GPU ofcourse, i saw some kits form EK including a res, pump, rad, and CPU block + tubing and fittings.

Those prebuilt kits get you up and running, but often it's not optimal, and sometimes requires the purchase of additional fittings. If you go with an aluminum kit, you have to be wary of mixing metals, it can be done safely (which requires more consideration into your coolant), but is generally discouraged, best practice is to stick to similar metals. None of the kits I know of plan for a fill or drain port. Incorporating both of these will make your life a lot easier.
Your loop layout may be a case where you can't make it work without an angled fitting. The way mine is laid out, I can't make it work without a T-Junction (splitting off to my drain valve), a 45° (out of my GPU), and two 90° (out of my pump, out of my rad)

If you're worried about not having everything you need, just remember that each component in your loop requires two fittings; one in, one out (it's also worth noting that some blocks have a flow direction that you need to pay attention to as well). Radiator, waterblock(s), reservoir, pump (if you don't have a res/pump combo that means four fittings, if it's a combo, it means two)

Start researching loop builds in your R6, you'll start to get an idea for what you like. If you're unable to tell from pictures, see if you can contact the builder, see what fittings they used. There may be others that are able to provide input on this forum about parts they've used, I can't, however, as I've never worked in an R6.


~Remember to quote posts to continue support on your thread~
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CPU:  Intel  i7-4790k | RAM: 4x4GB G.Skill Ripjaws Z | Cooling: XSPC/EK/Bitspower loop | MOBO: MSI Z97-G45 | PSU: Seasonic Prime 750 Titanium  

SSD: 250GB Crucial MX200 (OS) | 1TB Crucial MX500 | Case: Phanteks Evolv X | GPU: EVGA GTX 1080 Ti FTW3 (with EK Block) | HDD: 1x Seagate Barracuda 2TB

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Posted · Original PosterOP
3 minutes ago, Semper said:

Those prebuilt kits get you up and running, but often it's not optimal, and sometimes requires the purchase of additional fittings. If you go with an aluminum kit, you have to be wary of mixing metals, it can be done safely (which requires more consideration into your coolant), but is generally discouraged, best practice is to stick to similar metals. None of the kits I know of plan for a fill or drain port. Incorporating both of these will make your life a lot easier.
Your loop layout may be a case where you can't make it work without an angled fitting. The way mine is laid out, I can't make it work without a T-Junction (splitting off to my drain valve), a 45° (out of my GPU), and two 90° (out of my pump, out of my rad)

If you're worried about not having everything you need, just remember that each component in your loop requires two fittings; one in, one out (it's also worth noting that some blocks have a flow direction that you need to pay attention to as well). Radiator, waterblock(s), reservoir, pump (if you don't have a res/pump combo that means four fittings, if it's a combo, it means two)

Start researching loop builds in your R6, you'll start to get an idea for what you like. If you're unable to tell from pictures, see if you can contact the builder, see what fittings they used. There may be others that are able to provide input on this forum about parts they've used, I can't, however, as I've never worked in an R6.

As of right now, these are the parts i deicided to go with. Because i am going for soft-tubing i think i have enough fittings. I should be good with 8 ( CPU / GPU / PUMP-RES / RAD)

I have a fairly good idea how i want my loop to go, since i am not going for "Pretty" yet i dont mind if it looks a bit messy. Once i get the hang of it i will switch i out for hardline later on. 

Untitled.jpg

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19 minutes ago, Senenter said:

As of right now, these are the parts i deicided to go with. Because i am going for soft-tubing i think i have enough fittings. I should be good with 8 ( CPU / GPU / PUMP-RES / RAD)

I have a fairly good idea how i want my loop to go, since i am not going for "Pretty" yet i dont mind if it looks a bit messy. Once i get the hang of it i will switch i out for hardline later on. 

*snip*

Soft and hard tubing generally will require the same amount of fittings, unless you're making an inline bend with fittings instead of the tube itself. You'll still have the same basic requirement of two fittings per component.
I'm not saying what you're doing is wrong, but I can't let you make your purchase in good faith without bringing attention that going with soft tubing now, with a plan to 'upgrade' to hard later is going to increase the cost of your loop. All the fittings you purchase for soft will not be usable with hardline. It's a consideration that warrants thought before making a fairly large investment.

I'm also not seeing accommodations for a fill or drain port, which I must once again, urge you to consider adding. Open loops require maintenance, it's generally (meaning that some fluids recommend every six months, and boutique or showroom fluids are generally only meant for a few days of use) recommended to drain your loop once a year and replace the coolant. This is a much more difficult process without a low-point drain in your loop. A fill port isn't as necessary, but it is a consideration so that you're not having to contort yourself to all manner of odd angles to fill your res. Filling bottles can be helpful here as well.

Lastly, according to Corsair's compatibility check, that block is not compatible with your GPU
y8EUoAl.png

https://www.corsair.com/us/en/Categories/Products/Custom-Cooling/Blocks/GPU-Blocks/Hydro-X-Series-XG7-RGB-20-SERIES-GPU-Water-Block-(2070-FE)/p/CX-9020008-WW#tab-gpu-compatibility


~Remember to quote posts to continue support on your thread~
-Don't be this kind of person-

CPU:  Intel  i7-4790k | RAM: 4x4GB G.Skill Ripjaws Z | Cooling: XSPC/EK/Bitspower loop | MOBO: MSI Z97-G45 | PSU: Seasonic Prime 750 Titanium  

SSD: 250GB Crucial MX200 (OS) | 1TB Crucial MX500 | Case: Phanteks Evolv X | GPU: EVGA GTX 1080 Ti FTW3 (with EK Block) | HDD: 1x Seagate Barracuda 2TB

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Posted · Original PosterOP
9 hours ago, Semper said:

Soft and hard tubing generally will require the same amount of fittings, unless you're making an inline bend with fittings instead of the tube itself. You'll still have the same basic requirement of two fittings per component.
I'm not saying what you're doing is wrong, but I can't let you make your purchase in good faith without bringing attention that going with soft tubing now, with a plan to 'upgrade' to hard later is going to increase the cost of your loop. All the fittings you purchase for soft will not be usable with hardline. It's a consideration that warrants thought before making a fairly large investment.

I'm also not seeing accommodations for a fill or drain port, which I must once again, urge you to consider adding. Open loops require maintenance, it's generally (meaning that some fluids recommend every six months, and boutique or showroom fluids are generally only meant for a few days of use) recommended to drain your loop once a year and replace the coolant. This is a much more difficult process without a low-point drain in your loop. A fill port isn't as necessary, but it is a consideration so that you're not having to contort yourself to all manner of odd angles to fill your res. Filling bottles can be helpful here as well.

Lastly, according to Corsair's compatibility check, that block is not compatible with your GPU
y8EUoAl.png

https://www.corsair.com/us/en/Categories/Products/Custom-Cooling/Blocks/GPU-Blocks/Hydro-X-Series-XG7-RGB-20-SERIES-GPU-Water-Block-(2070-FE)/p/CX-9020008-WW#tab-gpu-compatibility

Thanks for the responses, you allready helped me a great deal allready! 
Considering the waterblock for the GPU, i thought that the RTX 2080 Gaming X Trio from MSI used the same PCB layout as the Founders Edition. But i guess this is not case then. Are the Vector series from EK a good subsitute?

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The Gaming X Trio most definitely does not use a reference PCB layout, it's quite radically different, actually.

Reference:
95bHpaZ.png

 

Gaming X Trio:
front.jpg

Through a quick search, it looks as though options for your card are fairly limited. EK's Vector line, and a block from Bykski are the only results I was able to find (granted it was only the first page). The Vector series is already listed as EOL, so I'm guessing they didn't sell particularly well. Stock may vary, but EK make quality products, they're among, if not the biggest, name(s) in custom loop cooling.


~Remember to quote posts to continue support on your thread~
-Don't be this kind of person-

CPU:  Intel  i7-4790k | RAM: 4x4GB G.Skill Ripjaws Z | Cooling: XSPC/EK/Bitspower loop | MOBO: MSI Z97-G45 | PSU: Seasonic Prime 750 Titanium  

SSD: 250GB Crucial MX200 (OS) | 1TB Crucial MX500 | Case: Phanteks Evolv X | GPU: EVGA GTX 1080 Ti FTW3 (with EK Block) | HDD: 1x Seagate Barracuda 2TB

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