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OS Question

K0MP4CT

Just out of curiosity and to possibly find the cause to a problem I was having:

 

If I were to disconnect my OS SSD while it was running and in use, would the PC switch off without warning?

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Just out of curiosity and to possibly find the cause to a problem I was having:

 

If I were to disconnect my OS SSD while it was running and in use, would the PC switch off without warning?

It would probably hang and start beeping violently. 

 

 

 

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you should never do that, and probably, yes. You would likely get a ton of errors and beeps from the motherboard (if it has a speaker connected)

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I've never once done it intentionally. My PC has been switching off randomly, I tightened the connection between my SSD and it's connector and it seems to have fixed it. Do you think a lose connection was my issue?

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Just out of curiosity and to possibly find the cause to a problem I was having:

 

If I were to disconnect my OS SSD while it was running and in use, would the PC switch off without warning?

I have already tested this.

2 possibilities can happen (this applies to Vista and up, with a SATA drive, and the SATA controller set to AHCI mode):

-> You'll a BSOD as the HDD/SSD was in use by Windows or something.

-> If you are COMPLETELY at idle with 0 disk access, you can pull the SATA drive and Windows will still run. You can move your mouse, open the start menu, etc. Why? Because everything running, including Windows itself is in your RAM. If you execute a program, or browse a folder, then nothing will happen. Once you plug the HDD/SSD back in, Windows will re-sync with the drive, check for errors internally (takes several seconds, the computer will act frozen for a moment), and execute all the actions you did in order when the drive was unplug and needed it in order to continue. This is possible, because since Vista, Windows put itself on your RAM, and only uses the page file when needed. It doesn't act like you are low in RAM no matter how much RAM you have, like XP and older versions. It is pretty cool to see the robustness of Windows when doing this.

Of course, I HIGHLY not recommend doing this, because if you unplug your drive while it is being used by a background process, or Windows itself, you highly risk of corrupted files, if it was writing something, and your system might no longer operate properly (something specific broke, witch might not show to you at first), or lose personal information. If you really want to play around, be sure that the data on the drive is already backuped, or you really don't care about it, and ready to re-install Windows in any case, even if it looks like everything is working fine.

Keep in mind that I highly DO NOT recommend to pull the POWER of your HDD/SSD, as pulling the plug isn't ever straight, and some pin might give connection while other don't which can fry the drive, only unplug the SATA cable (no power is being sent on it).

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I've never once done it intentionally. My PC has been switching off randomly, I tightened the connection between my SSD and it's connector and it seems to have fixed it. Do you think a lose connection was my issue?

Power offs are usually related to PSU more than anything else. Loose power connector.

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