Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Jank Grounding ?

 Share

So, a friend of mine having a bit of conundrum.
His old house wiring (220v) doesn't have ground wire, and the already installed wires is a twin (no ground wire), and is inside the brick & cement wall.
And since he wants to provide ground for his PC & Audio, he's thinking to install a 3-6ft grounding rod somewhere on his lawn, then run a single #10 awg (around 6mm²) copper wire directly from the rod to the outlet he's using for his PC & Audio .

 

Changing the whole house wiring, or running a new triplet wire from the main breaker is very likely not an option he can afford.
A single wire is cheaper than triplets, and running triplets for atleast 200ft (possibly more because his interior is like a damn labyrinth) is going to burn his wallet.

So, my questions to you guys are :
- Is it okay to do it the way my friend wants to do it ? Like, will it cause problem?
- I've heard somewhere that the ground wire need to be connected to neutral at the main breaker, is this true? does it mean he have to connect the ground wire to the neutral in the wall outlet ?
- Is there another option ?

There is approximately 99% chance I edited my post

Refresh before you reply

__________________________________________

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't lose track of the purpose of the ground circuit. It's primarily a safety device. If you don't understand exactly what needs to be done, you should be consulting an electrician to ensure the safety of all who may use the outlet.

Main: AMD Ryzen 9 3900X @ 4.2 GHz, Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti, 16 GB 4400 MHz DDR4 Fedora 36 x86_64

Secondary: Intel Xeon W3680, NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060, 24 GB 1333 MHz DDR3 Windows 10 Home x86_64

Server: AMD Ryzen 5 5600G, 16 GB 3200 MHz DDR4 TrueNAS Core

Home Laptop: Intel Core i5-L16G7, 8 GB 4267 MHz LPDDR4x Windows 11 Home 21H2 x86_64

Work Laptop: Intel Core i7-10510U, NVIDIA Quadro P520, 8 GB 2667 MHz DDR4 Windows 10 Pro 21H2 x86_64

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ask an electrician, advice is free, usually. 220 volts is nothing to fool with. Normally the ground wire is way bigger than 10 gauge.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, svmlegacy said:

Don't lose track of the purpose of the ground circuit. It's primarily a safety device. If you don't understand exactly what needs to be done, you should be consulting an electrician to ensure the safety of all who may use the outlet.

 

3 hours ago, LWM723 said:

Ask an electrician, advice is free, usually. 220 volts is nothing to fool with. Normally the ground wire is way bigger than 10 gauge.

Yea, that's one of the problem.

Most if not all electrician here doesn't give advice for free, more like charge a lot.
They also doesn't mind using a 2x0,75mm² wire for a 2400watt appliance. 🙄

I'd report them, but not like they'll get jailed.
Here it doesn't need a license to advertise oneself as "electrician". The govt never checks it, and pretty much doesn't care about it.
There's a guidebook from the govt, but hardly ever followed by these "electrician" (if they even know about it at all).
additional details : Even the guy sent by the Govt backed power company sometimes skips some stuffs in the guidebook, if not outright doesn't know at all.

My friend won't mind using thicker gauge, he's just wondering whether the method he's thinking of can work for that one single outlet that he use for his PC & Audio.
He wants to use surge protector i think.
and in the guidebook from the govt for grounding wire is that the ground wire need to be at least #10awg (around 6mm)

There is approximately 99% chance I edited my post

Refresh before you reply

__________________________________________

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

You would want to ground just the outlet then. Run the ground wire to the ground terminal ONLY. DO NOT ATTACH IT TO THE NEUTRAL TERMINAL. Of course you will need a 3-prong wall outlet, which i assume you have. I can't believe the licensing laws in your country, sounds like a free-for-all. Really dangerous. Oh, shut power off when hooking this up.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

55 minutes ago, LWM723 said:

You would want to ground just the outlet then. Run the ground wire to the ground terminal ONLY. DO NOT ATTACH IT TO THE NEUTRAL TERMINAL. Of course you will need a 3-prong wall outlet, which i assume you have. I can't believe the licensing laws in your country, sounds like a free-for-all. Really dangerous. Oh, shut power off when hooking this up.

Yea well. I thought about it as well.
No ground can be dangerous, jank ground can also become dangerous.
So it's about which situation is more likely to happen and which option is less dangerous.

Lightning strikes hardly ever happens, I actually never seen / heard it happen near me in my entire 30ish years living, there's many tall buildings with lightning rod around.
The electricity from the grid... is not what I'd call very stable/consistent.

Yea all the outlets are 3 prong, well technically 2, it's a Schuko outlet. It's the most common outlet in my country since at the very least 15 years ago.
Except outlets for air conditioning, since it came with UK Plug (one that has fuse in it), but even that the technician often cuts them, then DIY a schuko plug onto it. Or cut the ground wire inside the plug.

 

That's how jank and loose it is here.

Ever seen x10 #14awg copper wires spun together without a wire nut for each Live & Neutral, only electrical tape, then bent and mushed into a hole only as big as half an SSD ? There's a lot here.
Using heatshrink isnt even a thing here until like 1-2 years ago.

There is approximately 99% chance I edited my post

Refresh before you reply

__________________________________________

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share


×