Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Noctua SSO bearings for case fans that need to fit in tight spaces

cleric_warlock
 Share

Go to solution Solved by LIGISTX,
5 minutes ago, cleric_warlock said:

I've been working with a corsair 7000D airflow case and have my build fully up and running, now it just needs to be optimized for overclocking. So far have an arctic liquid freezer ii 420 aio cpu cooler completely covering the top exhaust panel, a 360 mm liquid cooler for my gpu covering most of the side exhaust panel (right next to the front intake) and 3 stock corsair 140 mm fans, 2 providing front intake and 1 providing rear exhaust. I prefer to keep all of my aio coolers in push orientation as they are now to minimize stray heat dissipation from the radiators to the interior of the case. If I switched to a pull orientation for my gpu cooler I would be able to neatly fit 4 x 120mm fans onto my case's fan grating at the cost of putting my gpu radiator right next to my main intake airflow which I would prefer to avoid.

 

If I keep my gpu cooler in push orientation i can still fit in the extra 120mm fan, but it becomes a tight fit and i would need to be creative in securing the top of my fan with tape or something along those lines. I checked the fit with a foam block that I cut to the dimensions of a 120 x 120 x 25 fan. Some nearby components of my cpu radiator, cabling, and case could exert constant pressure on the fan's frame, but won't interfere with the fan itself at all. I know from experience that this can be a problem for fluid dynamic bearing fans as contact pressure on the frame can drastically increase noise and wear while the internal friction and heat of the bearings can result in some noxious fumes. Do SSO fans have this issue when their frames are under pressure? If so, what bearing type would be best for this situation?  

Pull vs push doesn't really make any difference in cooling or stray heat. And putting the rad in the flow of intake air also isn't going to make any difference. The VAST majority of heat is dissipated by the fins, the body of the rad is going to radiate about the same amount of heat with or without direct airflow from intake fans blowing by it. 

I've been working with a corsair 7000D airflow case and have my build fully up and running, now it just needs to be optimized for overclocking. So far have an arctic liquid freezer ii 420 aio cpu cooler completely covering the top exhaust panel, a 360 mm liquid cooler for my gpu covering most of the side exhaust panel (right next to the front intake) and 3 stock corsair 140 mm fans, 2 providing front intake and 1 providing rear exhaust. I prefer to keep all of my aio coolers in push orientation as they are now to minimize stray heat dissipation from the radiators to the interior of the case. If I switched to a pull orientation for my gpu cooler I would be able to neatly fit 4 x 120mm fans onto my case's fan grating at the cost of putting my gpu radiator right next to my main intake airflow which I would prefer to avoid.

 

If I keep my gpu cooler in push orientation i can still fit in the extra 120mm fan, but it becomes a tight fit and i would need to be creative in securing the top of my fan with tape or something along those lines. I checked the fit with a foam block that I cut to the dimensions of a 120 x 120 x 25 fan. Some nearby components of my cpu radiator, cabling, and case could exert constant pressure on the fan's frame, but won't interfere with the fan itself at all. I know from experience that this can be a problem for fluid dynamic bearing fans as contact pressure on the frame can drastically increase noise and wear while the internal friction and heat of the bearings can result in some noxious fumes. Do SSO fans have this issue when their frames are under pressure? If so, what bearing type would be best for this situation?  

Current PC:

  • CPU
    Intel i9-12900KS
  • Motherboard
    Asus Rog Maximus Z690 Hero
  • RAM
    G.Skill Trident Z5 DDR5-6400; 2 x (16GB x 2); CL32-39-39-102; 1.40 V
  • GPU
    Aorus Xtreme Waterforce RTX 3090 TI
  • Case
    Corsair 7000D Airflow
  • Storage
    2 x 2TB WD Black sn850 SSDs
  • PSU
    EVGA Supernova 1600W P2, Fully Modular
  • Display(s)
    34" 1900R Alienware AW3418DW Black, 32" Samsung Odyssey G7 240Hz
  • Cooling
    Arctic Liquid Freezer ii 420, Built in 360mm gpu rad, 7 x 140mm Noctua NF-A14's (4 used as full case fan set, 3 used to upgrade CPU rad fans), 4 x 120mm Noctua NF-F12's (3 used to upgrade GPU rad stock fans, 1 used to fill last remaining case fan slot)
  • Keyboard
    Fidio Mechanical Gaming Keyboard
  • Mouse
    Asus Rog Spatha X
  • Sound
    SteelSeries Arctis Pro + Game DAC Wired Headset
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
  • PCPartPicker URL

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, cleric_warlock said:

I've been working with a corsair 7000D airflow case and have my build fully up and running, now it just needs to be optimized for overclocking. So far have an arctic liquid freezer ii 420 aio cpu cooler completely covering the top exhaust panel, a 360 mm liquid cooler for my gpu covering most of the side exhaust panel (right next to the front intake) and 3 stock corsair 140 mm fans, 2 providing front intake and 1 providing rear exhaust. I prefer to keep all of my aio coolers in push orientation as they are now to minimize stray heat dissipation from the radiators to the interior of the case. If I switched to a pull orientation for my gpu cooler I would be able to neatly fit 4 x 120mm fans onto my case's fan grating at the cost of putting my gpu radiator right next to my main intake airflow which I would prefer to avoid.

 

If I keep my gpu cooler in push orientation i can still fit in the extra 120mm fan, but it becomes a tight fit and i would need to be creative in securing the top of my fan with tape or something along those lines. I checked the fit with a foam block that I cut to the dimensions of a 120 x 120 x 25 fan. Some nearby components of my cpu radiator, cabling, and case could exert constant pressure on the fan's frame, but won't interfere with the fan itself at all. I know from experience that this can be a problem for fluid dynamic bearing fans as contact pressure on the frame can drastically increase noise and wear while the internal friction and heat of the bearings can result in some noxious fumes. Do SSO fans have this issue when their frames are under pressure? If so, what bearing type would be best for this situation?  

Pull vs push doesn't really make any difference in cooling or stray heat. And putting the rad in the flow of intake air also isn't going to make any difference. The VAST majority of heat is dissipated by the fins, the body of the rad is going to radiate about the same amount of heat with or without direct airflow from intake fans blowing by it. 

Rig: i7 10700k @ 5.1Ghz, 4.8 Ring - - Z490 Vision G - - EVGA RTX 2080 XC Ultra @ 2025Mhz - - 4x8GB Vengeance Pro 3000Mhz 15-17-17-34 @ 3500MHz 16-19-19-38 - - Samsung 950 Pro 512 NVMe Boot + Main Programs - - Samsung 830 Pro 256 RAID 0 Lightroom + Photo work - - WD Blue 1 TB SSD for Games - - Corsair RM850x - - Sound BlasterX EA-5 - - EK Supremacy Evo - - XT45 X-Flow 420 + UT60 280 rads - - EK Full Cover GPU Block - - EK XRES RGB PWM - - Fractal Define S2 - - Acer Predator X34 -- Logitech G502 - - Logitech G710+ - - Logitech Z5500 - - LTT Deskpad

 

Headphones/amp/dac: Schiit Lyr 3 - - Fostex TR-X00 - - Sennheiser HD 6xx

 

Homelab/ Media Server: Proxmox VE host - - 512 NVMe Samsung 980 for VM's/Proxmox boot - - Xeon e5 2660 V4- - Supermicro X10SRF-i - - 64 GB ECC 2133 - - 10x4 TB WD Red RAID Z2 - - 10TB WD Red for expendable data - - Corsair 750D - - Corsair RM650i - - Dell H310 6Gbps SAS HBA - - Intel RES2SC240 SAS Expander - - TreuNAS + many other VM’s

 

iPhone Xs - 2018 MacBook Air

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, LIGISTX said:

Pull vs push doesn't really make any difference in cooling or stray heat. And putting the rad in the flow of intake air also isn't going to make any difference. The VAST majority of heat is dissipated by the fins, the body of the rad is going to radiate about the same amount of heat with or without direct airflow from intake fans blowing by it. 

What you're saying makes total sense, push or pull, the airstream from the intake through the radiator should be the same, keeping heat bleed into the case to a minimum but it's a struggle fighting my monkey brain instinct that says push = good, pull = bad XD. Pull on the gpu rad it is.

Current PC:

  • CPU
    Intel i9-12900KS
  • Motherboard
    Asus Rog Maximus Z690 Hero
  • RAM
    G.Skill Trident Z5 DDR5-6400; 2 x (16GB x 2); CL32-39-39-102; 1.40 V
  • GPU
    Aorus Xtreme Waterforce RTX 3090 TI
  • Case
    Corsair 7000D Airflow
  • Storage
    2 x 2TB WD Black sn850 SSDs
  • PSU
    EVGA Supernova 1600W P2, Fully Modular
  • Display(s)
    34" 1900R Alienware AW3418DW Black, 32" Samsung Odyssey G7 240Hz
  • Cooling
    Arctic Liquid Freezer ii 420, Built in 360mm gpu rad, 7 x 140mm Noctua NF-A14's (4 used as full case fan set, 3 used to upgrade CPU rad fans), 4 x 120mm Noctua NF-F12's (3 used to upgrade GPU rad stock fans, 1 used to fill last remaining case fan slot)
  • Keyboard
    Fidio Mechanical Gaming Keyboard
  • Mouse
    Asus Rog Spatha X
  • Sound
    SteelSeries Arctis Pro + Game DAC Wired Headset
  • Operating System
    Windows 11 Pro
  • PCPartPicker URL

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share


×