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Wall adapter amperage value?

h4lf_gr33k
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Go to solution Solved by TheEpicDuck,

As long as it's higher it will be fine

I have this old 12v 3A wall adapter. It seems to be fed up with life - my monitor (which I use with this brick) ripples and flickers a lot. I opened the monitor in question up and did not find anything wrong (like swollen capacitors), therefore the power brick seems to be the culprit.

I am looking to buy a new one to use with an old sensor monitor. I've seen 12v 5A adapters, and I wanted to ask if the amperage value is something to be worried about here, and my monitor is not going to catch fire if used with a higher amperage rated power brick.

If this seems like a stupidly easy question to answer, I'm sorry - I am tired and not thinking straight.

20210909_180629.jpg

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30 minutes ago, TheEpicDuck said:

As long as it's higher it will be fine

Terrific! Thanks, mate.

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The amperage is the maximum current the adapter can give to a device. 

The device takes as much current as it needs, could be half an amp, could be 1A , could be 2A - in the case of a monitor, it will depend mostly on the brightness setting you have, because 90% of the energy consumed is in the LEDS that light up the panel. 

 

So you can use an adapter rated for higher current, and probably also an adapter rated for slightly less current, especially if you don't run the monitor at 100% brightness. 

 

You should open that adapter and replace the bad capacitors on the output and most likely you'll get at least another year from the adapter. 

If you open it up and take some pictures of the insides post them here and me or others could point out what you may need to replace to fix the adapter. 

 

Seems like the plastic is ultrasonic welded so you'd have to break the weld by squeezing the sides or around the point where the halfs are joined together. You can put it back together with some electrical tape or some super glue once you've fixed it. 

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