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A question for school work.

Simon Bottini

Hello, I was in IT class in school and the topic of storage units came up. The book we use refers to 1kb as 1 000 bytes, and to 1mb as 1 000 000 bytes. But it also makes a footnote and says that memory sizes used internally in the computer are powers of 2, so 1kb is 1024 bytes, and 1mb is 1 048 576 bytes. I wanted to ask which notation is correct, and what are the differences between them. 

Thanks for your time

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Kilo means one thousand

 

1 KILOBYTE means 1000 bytes.

 

Because computers work with powers of 2 ( one bit = 2 states, on or off, 1 byte is 8 bits or 28 or 256 possible values and so on) and it was more efficient for operating systems in the times of 8086 and 386 and so on to work with multiples of 2, operating systems like MS-DOS defined 1 KB as 1024 bytes or 210 bytes.  Same, 1 MB is 1024 Kilobytes  = 1024 x 1024 bytes = 220 bytes.

 

In order to reduce confusion, the organizations that deal with standards have invented KibiByte and MibiByte and so on, where bi stands for BINARY.

So 1 KibiByte = 1024 bytes, 1 MibiByte = 1024 KibiByte and so on.

 

However, people are so used with the old notation that in Windows and other places you may still see file sizes using the term Kilobytes when they actually mean 1024 bytes.

 

Also don't forget that networking equipment and some devices work with BITS ... so when you say 1kbps it means 1000 bits or 125 bytes, because there's 8 bits in a byte.

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8 bits = 1 byte

1024 bytes = 1KB

1024 KB = 1MB

1024 MB = 1GB

1024 GB = 1TB

etc, etc, etc

 

drive manufacturers define storage capacity by 1000x (where x is GB or TB, or whatever). This is why your "1TB" HDD only displays as 930GB rather than 1.00TB; Windows still operates off the binary standard that @mariushm talked about.

 

For internet speeds, they are usually referenced in Mbps (mega bits per second). 8Mbps is equal to 1MB/s (Megabytes per second), and it goes up similarly from there. iirc 8000mbps is considered to be 1Gbps.

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4 minutes ago, Eastman51 said:

8 bits = 1 byte

1024 bytes = 1KB

1024 KB = 1MB

1024 MB = 1GB

1024 GB = 1TB

etc, etc, etc

 

drive manufacturers define storage capacity by 1000x (where x is GB or TB, or whatever). This is why your "1TB" HDD only displays as 930GB rather than 1.00TB; Windows still operates off the binary standard that @mariushm talked about.

 

For internet speeds, they are usually referenced in Mbps (mega bits per second). 8Mbps is equal to 1MB/s (Megabytes per second), and it goes up similarly from there. iirc 8000mbps is considered to be 1Gbps.

Not quite.

Read below.

14 minutes ago, mariushm said:

Kilo means one thousand

 

1 KILOBYTE means 1000 bytes.

 

Because computers worked with powers of 2 and it was more efficient for operating systems in the times of 8086 and 386 and so on to work with multiples of 2, operating systems like MS-DOS defined 1 KB as 1024 bytes or 210 bytes.  Same, 1 MB is 1024 Kilobytes  = 1024 x 1024 bytes = 220 bytes.

 

In order to reduce confusion, the organizations that deal with standards have invented KibiByte and MibiByte and so on, where bi stands for BINARY.

So 1 KibiByte = 1024 bytes, 1 MibiByte = 1024 KibiByte and so on.

 

However, people are so used with the old notation that in Windows and other places you may still see file sizes using the term Kilobytes when they actually mean 1024 bytes.

^This is correct^

 

A small elaboration just to add info: 
When abbreviating these properly, they go as follows,

1024KiB = 1MiB

1024GiB = 1 TiB, etc

Uppercase "B" = Byte (or 8 bits)

Lowercase "b" = bit. (1/8th of a byte)

transfer speeds are almost always measured in bits, storage capacity are almost always measured in bytes.

It gets mildly confusing because writing data to a disk is measured in bytes per second, but the transfer across a device is measured in bits. 

 

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

 

Nowadays if you say "128GB SSD", most people realize that it's formatted size will be less then 128 GigaBytes because the manufacturer will measure it based on base10, but windows will see it as base2. So it "feels" smaller (for lack of a better word). 

Fine you want the PSU tier list? Have the PSU tier list: https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/1116640-psu-tier-list-40-rev-103/

 

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22 minutes ago, Brink2Three said:

Nowadays if you say "128GB SSD", most people realize that it's formatted size will be less then 128 GigaBytes because the manufacturer will measure it based on base10, but windows will see it as base2. So it "feels" smaller (for lack of a better word). 

With SSDs it's a bit more complicated.

While the Flash memory chips are manufactured using multiples of 2 (so a 128 GB SSD may use 4 x 32 GibiB flash memory chips) the manufacturers of SSDs will program the drives to say they only have 128 GB like mechanical drives (using multiples of 1000). This way, they hide a few GB worth of flash memory from the user. It's done for several reasons.

* to reduce confusion between regular hard drives and SSDs

* to use a part of that hidden memory for internal bookkeeping, to keep track of where each file is stored in which memory chip, how much each chip is used to reduce wear on memory cells

* a part of memory cells are kept as spare to extend the life of the SSD - as some memory cells wear out and can no longer hold data reliably, the ssd moves data into that spare area and hides everything from you and the drive behaves like nothing happened..

 

With cheaper flash with less endurance (TLC for example). the manufacturers go even further and sell a drive as 240 GB or 240.000.000.000 bytes but in reality there's 256 x 1024 x 1024 x 1024 bytes in memory cells. , so 56 x 1024 x 1024 x 1024 bytes are hidden from user and used to extend life of the SSD and for other reasons.

 

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4 minutes ago, mariushm said:

With SSDs it's a bit more complicated.

While the Flash memory chips are manufactured using multiples of 2 (so a 128 GB SSD may use 4 x 32 GibiB flash memory chips) the manufacturers of SSDs will program the drives to say they only have 128 GB like mechanical drives (using multiples of 1000). This way, they hide a few GB worth of flash memory from the user. It's done for several reasons.

* to reduce confusion between regular hard drives and SSDs

* to use a part of that hidden memory for internal bookkeeping, to keep track of where each file is stored in which memory chip, how much each chip is used to reduce wear on memory cells

* a part of memory cells are kept as spare to extend the life of the SSD - as some memory cells wear out and can no longer hold data reliably, the ssd moves data into that spare area and hides everything from you and the drive behaves like nothing happened..

 

With cheaper flash with less endurance (TLC for example). the manufacturers go even further and sell a drive as 240 GB or 240.000.000.000 bytes but in reality there's 256 x 1024 x 1024 x 1024 bytes in memory cells. , so 56 x 1024 x 1024 x 1024 bytes are hidden from user and used to extend life of the SSD and for other reasons.

 

This is also true. 

I was using the SSD purely for example, but technically a mechanical hard drive would be more accurate. 

I'll never turn down more info though. :D

Fine you want the PSU tier list? Have the PSU tier list: https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/1116640-psu-tier-list-40-rev-103/

 

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Evoo Gaming 15"
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