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DOS Virtualization?

Kickn4ss
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First off, I love y'all, I am a huge fan. But, before y'all say it isn't possible, currently the DOS program is working on Windows XP Machines with network drives mapped, network printers mapped, and lpt1 printers all functioning as they should. Also-- not sure if this is the right thread to be putting this under.. 

 

So I am working on a project where I need to basically virtualize a DOS program. Yes, I know it's the 21st century, and no I can't just run an emulator. There are roughly 18 users that currently RDP into Windows XP machines. 

 

We need the version of DOS to have a network driver, to be able to map a network drive, and to print to a network printer. It is currently working that way but we are trying to throw away and burn the Windows XP thin clients. Our first thought, and the easiest way for this to work, was to run VirtualBox or something similar on each of the end user's PC's and run the DOS Program on a windows 7 32 bit ISO. This is resource intensive, and wouldn't work long term on their simple 4gb i3 workstations. We would much rather throw the program into a server in the MDF so that this will be accessible from anywhere on their network. Preliminary tests show that this will not work with Synology, though I am sure there are several avenues in which we have not tried yet. We are also trying to avoid buying a $12,000 Dell or HP server and spinning up 18 or so windows 7 VM's. 

 

Thoughts, tips, input.. ideas? 

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Using ntvdm you can still run dos programs even on windows 10

My system-Core i7 6950X, AsusX99 DeluxeII, 128gb Crucial DDR4, Corsair 900D Titan X, Asus Thunderbolt EXII Card,Quadro M4000,Intel X540 network card

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45 minutes ago, Gwersebe said:

Using ntvdm you can still run dos programs even on windows 10

 

On 1/9/2019 at 2:33 AM, Kickn4ss said:

First off, I love y'all, I am a huge fan. But, before y'all say it isn't possible, currently the DOS program is working on Windows XP Machines with network drives mapped, network printers mapped, and lpt1 printers all functioning as they should. Also-- not sure if this is the right thread to be putting this under.. 

 

So I am working on a project where I need to basically virtualize a DOS program. Yes, I know it's the 21st century, and no I can't just run an emulator. There are roughly 18 users that currently RDP into Windows XP machines. 

 

We need the version of DOS to have a network driver, to be able to map a network drive, and to print to a network printer. It is currently working that way but we are trying to throw away and burn the Windows XP thin clients. Our first thought, and the easiest way for this to work, was to run VirtualBox or something similar on each of the end user's PC's and run the DOS Program on a windows 7 32 bit ISO. This is resource intensive, and wouldn't work long term on their simple 4gb i3 workstations. We would much rather throw the program into a server in the MDF so that this will be accessible from anywhere on their network. Preliminary tests show that this will not work with Synology, though I am sure there are several avenues in which we have not tried yet. We are also trying to avoid buying a $12,000 Dell or HP server and spinning up 18 or so windows 7 VM's. 

 

Thoughts, tips, input.. ideas? 

Unless they are 16-bit apps.

 

You can Virtualise the Windows XP box, or even the a Dos box. You'll want to double check the compatibility of the Application, as this will be one of the many ways to skin a cat projects. Do you throw the VM on a server and let people RPD to Virtual computer? do deploy the App via App-V? etc etc.

 

 

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