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Hyper-V vs VirtualBox

I want to run a virtual machine in my computer. I have Win8.1Pro, therefore i can use te built in Hyper-V Windows offers. The other option may be to install Oracle's Virtual Box. 

 

I want to run OS like Androidx86, Raspbianx86, or even a Linux distro but just for the fun of it or for small proyects. Going for a drive partition may be exagerated for what I want.

 

So... What are your opinions and suggestions about this?

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I would just use Hyper-v. Its a type1 hypervisor and you can close the VM console window and it will still run in the background.

 

The only negative I can think of; is that you cant copy/paste easily between the host and linux via the console, but this is easy to workaround once you install VNC or SSH on the VM. I like to use the WSL (windows subsystem for linux) to use bash "natively" in windows, and just use Xming on my host to display any remote GUIs.

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VMWare

Intel Core i3-10100 - Gigabyte Z490M - HyperX DDR4 16GB  - 500W - 1x 1080p - macOS 12 Monterey, Windows 11

Intel Core i5-4210U - Acer Aspire E5-573G - 8GB - 768p - macOS 11 Big Sur, Windows 11
iPhone 12 - iOS 15

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  • 2 weeks later...

Our company owns three small data centers in Florida (less than 100 servers in each location). My team is responsible for balancing resources between locations and staff needs. 

 

Every employee working in our company, and most of our contractors, work from virtual machines (VPSs) in our data centers. These virtual machines run on all three applications mentioned above- VirtualBox, Hyper-V and VM Ware, depending on the needs of the individual user.

 

VirtualBox is the easiest to setup, requires the fewest amount of resources, and affords the easiest way to move, backup or copy a VPS to another machine- simply by copying the single VM file it creates. We run several hundred virtual machines across our entire network, and more than 100 of them have been running on VirtualBox since 2014. It's an outstanding solution for users who want an easy, reliable way to run a handful of VM's on their machine for personal or small business use.

 

As a side note, one of the test servers in my office runs an older AMD 6 core cpu with only 16GB ram. I have 9 Virtualbox machines running at the same time on it, with no major issues. VirtualBox does a great job managing and sharing resources between multiple VM's.

 

Hyper-V does have a few advantages regarding stability and speed (because it's built directly into Windows), however it has some rather large drawbacks. Setting up a Hyper-V VM requires creating a "Virtual Switch" to allow your VM access to your network. If done incorrectly the setup process can permanently reserve network ports in your machine for VM's, which can create network problems for your main windows box. Simply removing Hyper-V won't fix this issue in many cases, requiring a complete reinstall of Windows itself. Hyper-V's main advantages are mostly targeted towards enterprise networks and clustered server environments. In addition, backing up or moving a Hyper-V vm is incredibly slow and there are many things that can go wrong to break the process, unless you purchase expensive third-party software.

 

VMWare is 3-4 times more expensive than any other Virtual solution on the market, is less powerful and feature-rich than Hyper-V, and is only worth considering for large enterprise networks and data centers with an unlimited IT budget for purchasing Hyper-V licenses and massive rack servers with lots of CPU's and ram. If your company meets this criteria, VMWare does offer a few advantages over the other two (like hardware and resource partitioning). 

 

Hope this helps!

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