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AleksiDj73

CPU Fan Speed runs 1900 RPM in winter but in summer 2400 RPM, why's that?

 

 

17 minutes ago, AleksiDj73 said:

Well i have the stock Intel CPU heatsink, so nothing special. OK so when summer comes up, i'll see if i can tell the difference in the noise

 

 

I notice the same issue with computer fans running at higher speeds when the room temperature gets warmer (especially during summer months), this is because the cooling system needs to run more air through the case/heatsink to be as effective since there being a lower difference in temperature between your hot components and your warm room as opposed to there being a cooler room (ex. your cooling would be more effective when it is 65 degrees fahrenheit as opposed to when it is 80 degrees fahrenheit in your room).

 

 

If you are concerned about the noise levels, I would recommend considering upgrading to an AIO liquid cooler (you can use custom loop, although it will require significantly more maintenance).

 

 

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Hello everyone, first of all, English is not my mother tongue so i hope you understand what i say. The answer may be obvious because in winter ambient temps are low and the CPU Fan speed will be low as well and the same applies to summer time. Currently, my CPU Fan Speed is 1854 RPM and that's the highest RPM in winter time (sometimes it hits 1900 RPM but that's very rare in winter), in summer time the highest i've seen is about 2400 RPM. The weird thing is that either in 1800 RPM or 2400 RPM i hear the same noise that my CPU Fan makes (i can't explain how's the sound, it's quite hard to explain), and the fan noise in general, doesn't change at all, it's the same. My question is, why does that happen? Is SpeedFan reporting wrong RPMs or are they true? Why can't i have the 2400 RPM in winter time aswell? Thank you

 

 

Specs:


• Motherboard - Gigabyte GA-P55M-UD2
• CPU - Intel Core I5-750 2.80ghz (OC'ed to 3.1GHz)
• Graphics Card - Gigabyte GTX 1050 TI Windforce 4GB (Not OC'ed)
• RAM - Corsair 12GB DDR3 1333mhz
• SSD - Samsung SSD 860 EVO 500GB

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to check the real rpm go to bios.

i guess in the summer the ambient temp are higher so the fans need to push more air to keep the same cpu temp.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
Just now, SupaKomputa said:

to check the real rpm go to bios.

i guess in the summer the ambient temp are higher so the fans need to push more air to keep the same cpu temp.

I've checked it and it's the same RPM as SpeedFan reports.

True true but the Fan noise is still the same though

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Posted · Original PosterOP
Just now, SupaKomputa said:

Depending on the design, you can't count on the noise to tell the speed.

Well i have the stock Intel CPU heatsink, so nothing special. OK so when summer comes up, i'll see if i can tell the difference in the noise

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Posted · Best Answer

 

 

17 minutes ago, AleksiDj73 said:

Well i have the stock Intel CPU heatsink, so nothing special. OK so when summer comes up, i'll see if i can tell the difference in the noise

 

 

I notice the same issue with computer fans running at higher speeds when the room temperature gets warmer (especially during summer months), this is because the cooling system needs to run more air through the case/heatsink to be as effective since there being a lower difference in temperature between your hot components and your warm room as opposed to there being a cooler room (ex. your cooling would be more effective when it is 65 degrees fahrenheit as opposed to when it is 80 degrees fahrenheit in your room).

 

 

If you are concerned about the noise levels, I would recommend considering upgrading to an AIO liquid cooler (you can use custom loop, although it will require significantly more maintenance).

 

 


Hope this information post was helpful  ?,

        @Boomwebsearch 

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Posted · Original PosterOP
10 minutes ago, Boomwebsearch said:

 

 

 

 

I notice the same issue with computer fans running at higher speeds when the room temperature gets warmer (especially during summer months), this is because the cooling system needs to run more air through the case/heatsink to be as effective since there being a lower difference in temperature between your hot components and your warm room as opposed to there being a cooler room (ex. your cooling would be more effective when it is 65 degrees fahrenheit as opposed to when it is 80 degrees fahrenheit in your room).

 

 

If you are concerned about the noise levels, I would recommend considering upgrading to an AIO liquid cooler (you can use custom loop, although it will require a lot more maintenance).

 

 

Thanks bud, that solved my question pretty well!

 

Honestly, i'm not really bothered with the noise, i'm kinda used to it. I don't think i'll upgrade to an AIO liquid cooler because that's kinda pointless, i don't have like a high-end CPU or something, i may upgrade to a better heatsink like a Hyper EVO 212 or something similar to that and i should be good as long as the temps stay 15-20c idle and not making a lot of noise with this kind of heatsink then i'm all set, no need to upgrade to AIO but thanks for your help!

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31 minutes ago, AleksiDj73 said:

Thanks bud, that solved my question pretty well!

 

Honestly, i'm not really bothered with the noise, i'm kinda used to it. I don't think i'll upgrade to an AIO liquid cooler because that's kinda pointless, i don't have like a high-end CPU or something, i may upgrade to a better heatsink like a Hyper EVO 212 or something similar to that and i should be good as long as the temps stay 15-20c idle and not making a lot of noise with this kind of heatsink then i'm all set, no need to upgrade to AIO but thanks for your help!

 

If you do plan on upgrading your CPU cooler from the stock Intel one, I would recommend Deep Cool's Gammax GT air cooler that has a universal-socket design:        https://www.amazon.com/GT-BK-Motherboard-Supported-Heatpipes/dp/B074P3JCXX/ref=redir_mobile_desktop?ie=UTF8&aaxitk=WBlHKdgwaqrtSrHCWZSGLw&hsa_cr_id=3708224700601&ref_=sb_s_sparkle

 

81ozlPV9xLL._AC_SL1500_.jpg


Hope this information post was helpful  ?,

        @Boomwebsearch 

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Posted (edited) · Original PosterOP
11 minutes ago, Boomwebsearch said:

 

 

 

If you do plan on upgrading your CPU cooler from the stock Intel one, I would recommend Deep Cool's Gammax GT air cooler that has a universal-socket design:        https://www.amazon.com/GT-BK-Motherboard-Supported-Heatpipes/dp/B074P3JCXX/ref=redir_mobile_desktop?ie=UTF8&aaxitk=WBlHKdgwaqrtSrHCWZSGLw&hsa_cr_id=3708224700601&ref_=sb_s_sparkle

 

81ozlPV9xLL._AC_SL1500_.jpg

That seems like a good CPU cooler but it's not supported for my motherboard or in other words it's not going to fit because i have an LGA1156 socket

 

Edit: Sorry sorry, i was wrong now i see it says "LGA115X" so it will fit on my motherboard

Edited by AleksiDj73
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