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Eleven different ways to disable Windows Update in Windows 10 (updated March 2019)

A highly important aspect of owning property, such as your computer hardware, the data on it as well as any data it generates, your Windows operating system, and other software you've purchased, is exclusively being the person that has the authority to make decisions over it, and being able to make the decisions that you know are the best for your situation.

 

As the European Union and Australia's top courts have ruled, and as even the US Supreme Court has indirectly supported, you own the software that you purchase, and you possess full property rights apply to your personally-owned software (with no comparable court in the world ruling contradictory to the European Union and Australia's top court rulings). The ownership rights that people possess over their software naturally includes full decision-making authority concerning whether their software may become modified or not, such as by updates.

 

In recent years, ever since the release of Windows 10, Microsoft has shown itself to be struggling to grasp the understanding of these things. Microsoft's efforts to oppose and sabotage Windows and PC system owners' ability to control and stop updates from being installed on their machines and modifying their OSes and storage drives against their wills constitutes a clear violation of property laws and is vandalism of people's computer systems and their personally-owned Windows OSes.

 

If you'd like more information about your ownership of your software, including Windows 10, and to learn about the nature of software licenses and EULAs, you can check out this link: You legally own the software that you purchase, and any claims otherwise are urban myth or corporate propaganda

 

 

 

Despite Microsoft's ongoing failure to meet its legal obligations to respect Windows owners' rights and property, there are a variety ways to take back control of your OS and make it more secure and reliable by controlling Windows Update. Here are 10 of them:

 

Method 1

One method is by using the Group Policy editor. The Group Policy editor is only available in Windows 10 Pro and Enterprise. If you have Home edition, you will have to follow one of the other methods.

 

Setting the Group Policy editor policy for Automatic Updates to Disabled does the following: "If the status for this policy is set to Disabled, any updates that are available on Windows Update must be downloaded and installed manually. To do this, search for Windows Update using Start."

 

To Disable the automatic updates group policy:

 

Step 1 - In the start menu, search for Group Policy, and open the policy editor

Step 2 - Navigate to: Computer Configuration -> Administrative Templates -> Windows Components -> Windows Update

Step 3 - In the folder containing policies for Windows Update, double-click on the policy titled "Configure Automatic Updates"

Step 4 - In the top-left area of the window that pops up, check the box that says Disabled

Step 5 - Press OK to close that window

 

5bace149e1512_Disableautomaticupdates.png.523acab94aa49f0a1dbbe08a234e8d85.png

 

 

If you don't want to stop Windows Update from letting you know when new updates are available, but want to stop automatic downloads and installations of updates, then follow this guide:

 

If following that video guide to stop automatic downloads and installs of Windows updates, then after about 2 months, you might start getting full-screen pop-ups after you boot into the OS saying that updates are available for your OS. There are additional guides online showing how to disable those full-screen pop-ups (which shouldn't be happening in the first place, but Microsoft is not a good company and acts abusively by nature).

 

 

 

Method 2  ---  now possible with Windows 1803 and newer!

Windows Update can be fully disabled by opening Services and then disabling the item for Windows Update. To re-enable Windows Update at a later time, just re-enable its service.

 

If using Windows 1803 or newer, you will have to first give your Windows account "ownership" over the WaaSMedicSvc.dll file that's located in C:\Windows\System32, and possibly over the entire System32 folder. A guide on how to do that is here.

 

After you have control over the WaaSMedicSvc.dll file, then do the following:

 

Step 1 - Go to C:\Windows\System32\

Step 2 - Locate and delete or rename the file WaaSMedicSvc.dll

Step 3 - In the start menu, search for and open Services

Step 4 - In the Services window, search for Windows Update and double-click on it to open it. Press Stop, and the set the Startup Type to Disabled. Then press OK to close the window.

 

If you need to re-enable the Windows Update service at a later time:

 

Step 1 - In the start menu, search for and open Services

Step 2 - In the Services window, search for Windows Update and open it. Press Stop, and the set the Startup Type to Disabled. Then press OK to close the window.

 

 

If using Windows 10 1709 and earlier, then the WaaSMedicSvc.dll file that automatically resets the Windows Update service isn't there, and so all it takes to disable Windows Update in earlier versions of Windows is this:

 

Step 1 - In the start menu, search for and open Services

Step 2 - In the Services window, search for Windows Update and double-click on it to open it. Press Stop, and the set the Startup Type to Disabled. Then press OK to close the window.

 

 

 

Method 3

Here is another Group Policy editor method. If you have Windows 10 Pro or Enterprise, you can run the Group Policy editor (GPEdit.msc) and set the Windows Update Source to a non-existent URL.

 

Step 1 - In the start menu, search for Group Policy, and open the policy editor

Step 2 - Navigate to: Computer Configuration -> Administrative Templates -> Windows Components -> Windows Update

Step 3 - In the folder containing policies for Windows Update, double-click on the policy titled "Specify Intranet Microsoft update service location"

Step 4 - In the upper-left of the Set the policy to "Enabled"

Step 4 - In the top-left area of the window that pops up, check the box that says Disabled

Step 4 - In the lower-left area of the window, under Options, set the intranet update service address and the intranet statistics server address to a URL that doesn't exist

Step 5 - Press OK to close that window

 

5bacd612ed049_GPEstopWUwithfakeupdatesURL.png.d35d9edaae76f1d868ef90f5adfa695a.png

 

 

 

Method 4

Use 3rd-party program NTLite to completely remove the Windows Update module from Windows.

 

1851170204_NTLiteWindowsUpdate.thumb.png.5a44bfbec7ad87e1d3e1655f535ace40.png

 

444144053_NTLiteWindowsUpdateafter.png.d2a90d9eae6dbaef7245c29fabd53e82.png

 

Removing Windows Update via this method apparently, or might (according to one person), also remove the "turn Windows features on or off" section in the Windows control panel. I don't know if this is true, and it sounds strange to me, but if it does then individual Windows components can still be enabled or disabled using PowerShell.

 

For information on how to do that, visit this page: https://www.ghacks.net/2017/07/14/use-windows-powershell-to-install-optional-features/

 

Here's a quote of the comment which appears to me to claim that removing Windows Update via NTLite also removes the "turn Windows features on or off" section in the Windows control panel:

Quote

Then when you have done go here to install optional feature by command prompt, 

https://www.ghacks.net/2017/07/14/use-windows-powershell-to-install-optional-features/

Removing windows updates service also removes the control panel "optional featureset" you see, so go to that website to enable or disable things by using powershell.

Here is an example: 

Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName "NetFx3" -All

A full list of commands are in the link above.

DO NOT remove the windows upadate service from services.msc or you wont be able to activate.

Just do what i said above.

You will also notice after doing this windows runs so much faster than before, due to all the bloat services being deleted permanently.

You are welcome.

 

 

 

Method 5

In Windows 10 1803, Microsoft behaves criminally and vandalizes Windows owners' OSes by re-enabling WU-restarting scheduled tasks and the WU service via a new service titled "Windows Update Medic Service". If "Windows Update Medic Service" could be independently disabled, it would be possible to first disable that service and then disable the Windows Update service and have it stay disabled. However, Microsoft is not an honest and fair player, and doesn't respect their customers nor even treats them as people with legitimate interests and goals concerning their personally-owned OS. So, things aren't quite that straight-forward.

 

However, they're still somewhat straight-forward, and here are some programs that will block Windows Update and disable the offending Windows Update Medic service:

 

5.1

Block Updates on Windows 10 using StopUpdates10, a 3rd-party tool which disables Windows Update:

https://www.thewindowsclub.com/block-updates-windows-10-stopupdates10

 

5.2

Block Updates on Windows 10 using Windows Update Blocker, a 3rd-party tool which disables Windows Update:

https://www.sordum.org/9470/windows-update-blocker-v1-1/

 

5.3

Block Updates on Windows 10 using StopWinUpdates, a 3rd-party tool which disables Windows Update:

https://www.majorgeeks.com/files/details/stopwinupdates.html

 

5.4

Disable Windows Update with one click using StopUpdates10

https://www.majorgeeks.com/files/details/stopupdates10.html

 

 

 

Method 6

There is a method to disable Windows Update involving using an offline Windows account (instead of a Microsoft account) described here:

 

https://www.wintips.org/how-to-turn-off-windows-10-updates-permanently/

 

For people not wanting their personal and personally-identifiable data harvested by Microsoft, it is strongly recommended to use a regular, "local" Windows account anyway and not a Microsoft account to log into Windows, as using a Microsoft account significantly increases the amount of personally-identifiable Windows usage data that is harvested by Microsoft.

 

 

 

Method 7

SimpleWall is a 3rd-party firewall program that has built-in protection rules for Windows Update that can be enabled.

 

https://www.thewindowsclub.com/simplewall-block-applications-from-using-internet

 

 

 

Method 8

There is a registry tweak to disable Windows Update, which might work for people on Home editions of Windows 10:

 

https://www.forbes.com/sites/gordonkelly/2015/08/26/windows-10-how-to-stop-forced-updates/#55d4846e46f6

 

Step 1 - Open the Run command (Win + R), in it type: regedit and press enter

Step 2 - Navigate to: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate\AU

Step 3 - In there create a ‘32-bit DWORD’ value called ‘AuOptions’ and under ‘Value Data’ type 2 and click ‘OK’
Step 4 - Open the Settings app (Win + I) and navigate to -> Update and Security -> Windows Updates. Click ‘Check for updates’ which applies the new configuration setting

Step 5 - Restart your PC

 

 

Alternatively, you can try this registry edit:

 

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate\AU 

Key: NoAutoUpdate 

Type: DWORD 

Value: 1 

 

To enable updates again, remove the "AU" registry key or delete NoAutoUpdate DWORD.

 

 

 

This Microsoft documentation offers alternate registry edits to disable Windows Update:

Quote

Add a REG_DWORD value named DoNotConnectToWindowsUpdateInternetLocations to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate and set the value to 1.

-and-

Add a REG_DWORD value named DisableWindowsUpdateAccess to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate and set the value to 1.

-and-

Add a REG_DWORD value named UseWUServer to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate\AU and set the value to 1.

 

Or:

Quote

Add a REG_DWORD value named AutoDownload to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\WindowsStore\WindowsUpdate and set the value to 5.

 

-or-

 

For Windows 10 only, apply the Update/AllowAutoUpdate MDM policy from the Policy CSP, where:

 

0. Notify the user before downloading the update.

1. Auto install the update and then notify the user to schedule a device restart.

2 (default). Auto install and restart.

3. Auto install and restart at a specified time.

4. Auto install and restart without end-user control.

5. Turn off automatic updates.

 

 

 

Method 9

You can also manually block Windows Update in your router's firewall, or in 3rd-party firewall software such as Comodo Firewall and PeerBlock. An advantage of using this method is that there is nothing that Microsoft can do to over-ride, reset, or ignore the block.

 

Be aware that some people have claimed that adding Microsoft servers to the Windows hosts file and to the Windows Defender Firewall will not block then because Windows 10 is maliciously designed to ignore any instructed blocking of Microsoft's own servers. I don't have confirmation that this is true, but if it is then you're going to have to block Microsoft's servers in a a 3rd-party firewall program such as those mentioned previously.

 

These are all or some of the Microsoft servers to block in your router's firewall or 3rd-party firewall software to block Windows Update:

 

windowsupdate.microsoft.com
*.windowsupdate.microsoft.com
*.update.microsoft.com
*.windowsupdate.com
download.windowsupdate.com
download.microsoft.com
*.download.windowsupdate.com
wustat.windows.com
ntservicepack.microsoft.com
*.ws.microsoft.com

 

That list was last updated in 2015, so there could be some servers to add to it. There is an updated list of Microsoft's data-harvesting servers to block, and a hosts file with Microsoft's data-harvesting servers already included in it, here:

 

https://encrypt-the-planet.com/windows-10-anti-spy-host-file/

 

There might be an updated list of Microsoft's Windows Update servers on that site, too.

 

 

 

Method 10

You can turn off your Windows 10 OS' connection to Microsoft's Windows Update server.

 

"Used to download operating system patches and updates. If you turn off traffic for these endpoints, the device will not be able to download updates for the operating system."

 

Source process: svchost 

Protocol: HTTPS

Destination:  *.windowsupdate.com

Destination:  fg.download.windowsupdate.com.c.footprint.net

 

For more information on that approach, see this link: https://mspoweruser.com/these-are-the-websites-your-clean-install-windows-pc-connects-to-by-itself/

 

 

 

Method 11

Prevent Windows Update's ability to connect online via the registry. I haven't tried this method and I'm just reporting it as I've seen it stated.

 

Quote

First delete "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate" tree entirely, to make sure there are no other settings that might interfere.

 

[Then add the following via cmd or a by creating a .reg key]

 

REG ADD "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate" /f /v WUServer /t REG_SZ /d "http://non-existent-url.net"
REG ADD "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate" /f /v WUStatusServer /t REG_SZ /d "http://non-existent-url.net"
REG ADD "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate" /f /v UpdateServiceUrlAlternate /t REG_SZ /d ""
REG ADD "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate" /f /v DoNotConnectToWindowsUpdateInternetLocations /t REG_DWORD /d 1
REG ADD "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate\AU" /f /v UseWUServer /t REG_DWORD /d 1
REG ADD "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate\AU" /f /v NoAutoUpdate /t REG_DWORD /d 1

 

After this a click on Windows Update will show the following error: "We couldn't connect to the update service. We'll try again later, or you can check now. If it still doesn't work, make sure you're connected to the Internet."

 

 

 

 

 

People should be aware that the reason why Microsoft tries to prevent Windows Update from being disabled is not due to security of your PC (if that was Microsoft's goal there would be a security-only updates setting, and it would be truly security-only), or making things easier for Microsoft's support efforts (which are dedicated from the outset of a new Windows release to run for a certain time-frame, and can't be reduced otherwise Microsoft would be guilty of false advertising), but is to provide Microsoft as many opportunities as possible to reset your Windows and default programs settings, as well as your data-harvesting settings, all back to the Microsoft defaults where Microsoft is able to harvest as much personal and personally-identifiable data about you as possible, while having lots of opportunities to add more data-harvesting to your OS.

 

And at the "Basic" setting, which is the most minimal data-harvesting setting in Windows 10 Home and Pro versions, Microsoft is continuously harvesting your personal and personally-identifiable data from over 3,500 individual data points. Altogether, that data forms a meticulous and comprehensive picture of all your activities in your Windows OS.

 

Also, Microsoft's documentation on the volume of data they are harvesting at the Basic setting is incomplete, as watching Microsoft's Diagnostic Data Viewer tool on the transmitted data reveals transmitted data containers that can't be referenced in Microsoft's documentation.

 

 

Selling your personal and personally-identifiable data is a big part of Microsoft's business model now - despite that it is actually illegal for Microsoft to do it because Windows 10 is legally and factually a product (which you own) and not a service (which you merely access). So, Microsoft harvesting your data is analogous to a thief entering your home, taking your possessions, and selling them for profit. This activity by Microsoft, where they commercialize Windows owners' PCs without a license, constitutes the indictable crime of unjust enrichment.

 

 

Another major reason why Microsoft wants to force Windows updates on people's personal Windows OSes is because the large bi-annual Windows 10 updates grant Microsoft frequent opportunity to deliberately break any 3rd-party UI customization software twice a year.

 

Microsoft does this because any 3rd-party UI customization software stops Microsoft's own UI systems from harvesting your personal and personally-identifiable data. Since Microsoft wants to steal as much of that data from you as possible so that Microsoft can then sell it for their unjust enrichment, Microsoft seeks for chances to break your custom software, and typically does so with each major update when Microsoft resets your Windows, program defaults, and data-privacy settings at the same time.

 

 

Trying to reason with Microsoft is like talking to a deranged psychopath who doesn't care about you in the least and who is only looking to exploit you as though you are not even human, and expecting them to see common sense and express empathy. Microsoft seeks to dominate and harvest, and not to serve and take into account its customers' needs and interests. Under Satya Nadella, Microsoft views its customers as its enemies to be defeated.

 

 

I hope this help many people regain their rightful control control of their operating system and to have a much more comfortable and stress-free experience in their own OS.

 

 

 

 

 

Old information:

 

In Windows 10 version 1803 and onward, the "Windows Update Medic Service" keep re-starting Windows Update and related scheduled tasks and re-creates Windows Update related scheduled tasks even after a person manually stops them, disables them, and removes the scheduled tasks. You could find another way to disable Windows Update Medic Service, which otherwise keeps re-starting Windows Update, and then disable Windows Update and any associated scheduled tasks.

 

http://batcmd.com/windows/10/services/waasmedicsvc/

 

One way to disable Windows Update Medic Service might be to disable Remote Procedure Call, which is what starts Windows Update Medic Service: http://batcmd.com/windows/10/services/rpcss/

 

Or by deleting the file "WaaSMedicSvc.dll" that's in the %WinDir%\System32 folder or possibly replacing it with another file and setting its permissions to "read only".

 

There is some information on disabling Windows Update medic Service and preventing it from re-enabling on this page: https://www.sordum.org/9470/windows-update-blocker-v1-1/

 

 

 

Method -- (superceded by current method 2)

Remove the files for all Windows 10 services that violate the commands of the system and Windows OS owner.

 

As of Windows 10 1803, the three offending Windows 10 services are:

 

- Windows Update (wuauserv)
- Windows Update Medic Service (WaaSMedic)
- Update Orchestrator Service (UsoSvc)

 

Background Intelligent Transfer Service (BITS), which might be thought of as also being involved, reportedly doesn't have any influence over the Windows 10 updates regime.

 

The files to be removed to stop the 3 offending services are all in the directory Windows\System32, and are the following files:


wusa.exe - windows update stand alone installer
wuapi.dll - windows update
wuaueng.dll - windows update
wuauclt.exe - old windows update

UsoClient.exe - update orchestrator
usoapi.dll - update orchestrator
usocore.dll - update orchestrator

WaaSMedicAssessment.dll - new medic service
WaaSMedicSvc.dll - new medic service
WaaSMedicPL.dll - new medic service

 

One Windows owner has reported that removing these files has fixed the Windows Update service from re-starting without authorization, without any detrimental effects on the rest of their system's operation. I haven't tried this method myself, and if anyone wants to add their feedback after trying it, please do.



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21 hours ago, didier12 said:

My first time here on your blog!

Very interesting stuff!

Keep up your good work!

 

Thanks! I have updated the post with a couple more methods to disable Windows Update, and have also refined the sections for the Group Policy methods and for the registry methods.

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I have updated the guide to include two new methods, Method 3, involving setting a policy in the GPE to redirect Windows Update to a URL that doesn't exist, and Method 10, which deletes the files involves in re-enabling the Windows Update service.

 

I have also added another 3rd-party Windows Update-blocking tool, and compounded all 3rd-party tools into Method 4 as 4.1, 4.2, and 4.3.

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Thanks Delicieuxz

 

I heard about this through the MS thread where you recently posted a reference

https://answers.microsoft.com/threadauth/603be1d3-b4c5-415a-9094-db0e9d3fc9ab/messages/a88ce533-2d51-4191-87db-ae6f9ce77fd9

 

I think I will be most interested in your firewall suggestions - that seems to be a good sledgehammer approach.

 

Was not able to reply to you there - I must have hit a sore point for MS as I seem to have been deactivated for posting and all my previous

posts have been stripped from the thread. They put up with a lot of verbal abuse there so I am inclined to think that they did not like my recent

posts advocating some kind of a github/open source model where we would keep track of all the known fixes and they would be documented, voted upon, given

a timeline and all the other tricks that would enable us to identify what was currently working and for whom. Really I was making the point that a forum thread is not

the best way to document because new comers regurgitate older posts and so just like urban myths its difficult to remove the old and disproved and keep the proven

highlighted and at the top. Perhaps MS fear protestors getting organised and grouping talent and technical know-how in a more organised way. Whatever I did not swear

or add links yet I seem to have been wiped from the thread. I will get back under a different identity.

 

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On 9/30/2018 at 10:38 AM, Jonnie45 said:

Thanks Delicieuxz

 

I heard about this through the MS thread where you recently posted a reference

https://answers.microsoft.com/threadauth/603be1d3-b4c5-415a-9094-db0e9d3fc9ab/messages/a88ce533-2d51-4191-87db-ae6f9ce77fd9

 

I think I will be most interested in your firewall suggestions - that seems to be a good sledgehammer approach.

 

Was not able to reply to you there - I must have hit a sore point for MS as I seem to have been deactivated for posting and all my previous

posts have been stripped from the thread. They put up with a lot of verbal abuse there so I am inclined to think that they did not like my recent

posts advocating some kind of a github/open source model where we would keep track of all the known fixes and they would be documented, voted upon, given

a timeline and all the other tricks that would enable us to identify what was currently working and for whom. Really I was making the point that a forum thread is not

the best way to document because new comers regurgitate older posts and so just like urban myths its difficult to remove the old and disproved and keep the proven

highlighted and at the top. Perhaps MS fear protestors getting organised and grouping talent and technical know-how in a more organised way. Whatever I did not swear

or add links yet I seem to have been wiped from the thread. I will get back under a different identity.

Hi Jonnie,

 

I noticed that your messages on that page disappeared, though I'm surprised that Microsoft removed them. It doesn't reflect well on Microsoft and suggests that Microsoft know they aren't acting innocently and that they feel threatened by suggestions such as yours.

 

If you start such a project, let me know. It'll be interesting to find out whether Microsoft would remove any tools or guides on disabling Windows Update in Windows 10 from github.

 

I still have your posts in my email from the notifications. Here are the ones calling for a public project dedicated to ensuring Windows Update stops obstructing people's rights over their computers and personally-owned Windows OS:

 

Quote

Class lawsuits would be very popular with me - I would chip if it were a crowd funded effort.

 

In the meantime regarding technical solutions.

 

It strikes me that a forum with a linear time line is not a great way to share fixes. I shared one a fair while ago which involved changing permissions on the download directory and it did work for me for a fair while. I could see the updates failing. It seems it failed recently unless I undid the permissions in my sleep and forgot I had done it, I have not got the the bottom of this yet but the point is that it definitely used to work for me once yet appears to have let me down once.

 

What we really need is something like an open source project with a web based hub

 

Open source projects involve many technical people coming together and improving and maintaining a coding project - there is always a latest version and a trail of information about previous versions and the bugs and issues that lead to changes being made.

 

An open source project for defeating windows updates might not actually produce code (an app) but might still manage one or more documents or procedures perhaps also with explanations but the essential quality is that whenever you visit the website you are seeing the latest version of all documents or tips. You can see a history which would tell you that perhaps procedure A had a loop hole or a failing for a percentage of users but now that has been fixed as a new step has been added. A document might end up being shelved because it was shown not to work in the long run but then we would see a "paper trail" with bugs reported, experts agreeing, someone perhaps suggesting how it had been defeated and so on.

 

The reason I feel that this thread is not serving our purpose as well as it might is that anyone coming to it fresh has to surf through many pages some of which recommend fixes that have been shown to be naive and no longer working - take for instance the fix that simply disables the update process  - people were still posting this one ages after most informed users had realised it simply did not work. There are all manner of technical levels of skill, some people have only just become interested in this issue, others have been suffering it and following developments for a long time - it is very difficult to get a coherent overview of where we are now - what works now, what has been suggested in the past but is known to fail now and so on.

 

I am very interested in the app posted by one user recently

https://www.thewindowsclub.com/block-updates-windows-10-stopupdates10

But wow would I install an app of unknown origin?

 

Thats the whole point about the open source style of working - many technical people all review the same code ( in our case lets say documented procedures ) and any single contributor can expect to have their input peer reviewed by others. I would have much more faith in an app like the above one if it came from an open source site like Github.

 

What we really need is an online focal point where code solutions, procedure solutions and similar can be maintained in one place, judged, reviewed, fixed, improved - perhaps given version numbers so that someone who is complaining something does not work can be questioned - what version did you apply? Have you seen the latest version of the document with the change notes so that you can perhaps update the fix you applied?

 

I could be wrong - maybe there is a one-time 100% fix out there that if only we all knew that this was the magic bullet we could all apply it and then leave this thread but I suspect that our battle with MS on the technical front will not be a single event and we will need to be prepared to be continually active. I think we need a better way to do this - something like an open source project.

 

And:

 

Quote

Thanks for the reminder - I had seen your post originally and I do intend to return to it but the issue for me here is about trust in software that might not have the usual provenance - hence a post I wrote today sketching out a wish that we could move all fixes whether software / app based or procedural ( documents )  to some kind of an open source platform so that we have the advantage of a time line, histories, peer review and the safety that comes from developers knowing that all coding contributions will be peer reviewed.

 

Do you have any knowledge about the source of this software? Does it have an "About Tab" giving any more details like a website for the developers who created it?

 

Seems to me that a trusted software provider, a reasonably big and trusted label could make a lot of money right now if they provided a safe ( virus malware adware free ) application that would be continually developed and improved to block window updates ( but perhaps optionally only allow some through ) - of course they would make an enemy of MS but it might be worth it for the financial gain.

 

Jon

 

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I've added another method to stop Windows Update:

 

Method 11

Deliberately break Windows Update's ability to connect online via the registry. I haven't tried this method and I'm just reporting it as I've seen it stated.
 

Quote

First delete "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate" tree entirely, to make sure there are no other settings that might interfere.

 

REG ADD "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate" /f /v WUServer /t REG_SZ /d "http://non-existent-url.net"
REG ADD "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate" /f /v WUStatusServer /t REG_SZ /d "http://non-existent-url.net"
REG ADD "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate" /f /v UpdateServiceUrlAlternate /t REG_SZ /d ""
REG ADD "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate" /f /v DoNotConnectToWindowsUpdateInternetLocations /t REG_DWORD /d 1
REG ADD "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate\AU" /f /v UseWUServer /t REG_DWORD /d 1
REG ADD "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate\AU" /f /v NoAutoUpdate /t REG_DWORD /d 1

 

After this a click on Windows Update will show the following error: "We couldn't connect to the update service. We'll try again later, or you can check now. If it still doesn't work, make sure you're connected to the Internet."

 

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I've added a method that once again lets the Windows owner disable and re-able Windows Update via the Services panel:

 

 

Method 2  ---  now possible with Windows 1803 and newer!

Windows Update can be fully disabled by opening Services and then disabling the item for Windows Update. To re-enable Windows Update at a later time, just re-enable its service.

 

If using Windows 1803 or newer, you will have to first give your Windows account "ownership" over the WaaSMedicSvc.dll file that's located in C:\Windows\System32, and possibly over the entire System32 folder. A guide on how to do that is here.

 

After you have control over the WaaSMedicSvc.dll file, then do the following:

 

Step 1 - Go to C:\Windows\System32\

Step 2 - Locate and delete or rename the file WaaSMedicSvc.dll

Step 3 - In the start menu, search for and open Services

Step 4 - In the Services window, search for Windows Update and double-click on it to open it. Press Stop, and the set the Startup Type to Disabled. Then press OK to close the window.

 

If you need to re-enable the Windows Update service at a later time:

 

Step 1 - In the start menu, search for and open Services

Step 2 - In the Services window, search for Windows Update and open it. Press Stop, and the set the Startup Type to Disabled. Then press OK to close the window.

 

 

If using Windows 10 1709 and earlier, then the WaaSMedicSvc.dll file that automatically resets the Windows Update service isn't there, and so all it takes to disable Windows Update in earlier versions of Windows is this:

 

Step 1 - In the start menu, search for and open Services

Step 2 - In the Services window, search for Windows Update and double-click on it to open it. Press Stop, and the set the Startup Type to Disabled. Then press OK to close the window.

 

 

 

I've also added the method of removing the Windows Update module from Windows entirely using the program NTLite. See the new Method 4 for details.

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Any simpler methods of doing this like those one click programs I've seen on Youtube.  Not to keen to try them though since who knows what they do to your computer!

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wyeJkQyD30g

 

Also, I've seen in our work place Windows 10 machines that don't ever update because updates are blocked.  This must be Method 6?

 

But what about Shutup10 though?  Does it really work?

 

https://www.oo-software.com/en/shutup10/update

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On 3/11/2019 at 10:47 PM, grss1982 said:

Any simpler methods of doing this like those one click programs I've seen on Youtube.  Not to keen to try them though since who knows what they do to your computer!

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wyeJkQyD30g

I'll add that one to method 5, which includes other programs like that. Thanks.

 

For a simple method, if you have Windows 10 Pro, I'd do method 1. If you have Home, I'd not worry about using that tool. I generally have confidence in Major Geeks stuff.

 

Method 9 is really easy to try with the Windows hosts file. The hosts file is located in C:\Windows\System 32\drivers\etc\. Then the hosts file is opened by right-clicking on it and choosing Open With, and then selecting Notepad and pressing OK. Then just copy and paste the servers listed into the hosts file and save the file then close it. So long as Windows doesn't ignore the inclusion of those servers in the hosts file, it should work to block Windows Update.

 

On 3/11/2019 at 10:47 PM, grss1982 said:

Also, I've seen in our work place Windows 10 machines that don't ever update because updates are blocked.  This must be Method 6?

Without more details known, it could be any of them.

 

On 3/11/2019 at 10:47 PM, grss1982 said:

But what about Shutup10 though?  Does it really work?

 

https://www.oo-software.com/en/shutup10/update

It's a good program. If it has an option to block Windows Update, then I think it will work. You can try it by setting it and then opening Windows Update and trying to search for any updates. Course, if ShutUp10 only disables the Windows Update group policy, then it might still search for updates when you manually tell Windows Update to.

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You can also disable the Windows Update Medic Service by setting the "start" value to "4" (disabled) in your registry locations noted here:         (try at your own risk of course)

 

Computer\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\Services\WaaSMedicSvc

Computer\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\WaaSMedicSvc

 

( Registry Key Values explained here:  https://www.itprotoday.com/compute-engines/what-are-errorcontrol-start-and-type-values-under-services-subkeys )

 

And FWIW, I managed to brick Windows Updates on my machine altogether by accident when heavily trimming Windows Services for efficiency and performance reasons.

 

In particular, disabling Network List Service AND Network Location Awareness services seemed to do the trick (in addition to disabling Windows Update of course, and possibly some other services I'm not aware of that I disabled but forgot were linked to Windows Update on the whole).

 

I also use O&O Shut Up 10 for good measure on top of all of this as I like what it has to offer.

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