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12900K idle temps

Hey all.  Hoping I can get some advice on this.
The wife and I recently had 2 brand new systems built, the specs are exactly the same on both and we're getting some different temps and such.
On my wife's system, her idle temps sit around 27c with a 360 AIO.  I have the same AIO and my temps run at 38-41.  Same case, same fans, same cooler, all purchase from the same store.  The system was assembled by the store.
Full specs
12900K
ASUS Z690-P Motherboard
MSI 12 GB 3080
16 GB DDR 5 5200
Voltages from HWMonitor seems the same on both.  

Another odd ball thing is that my wife's system will not boost to the full 5.2 Ghz.  It hit 5183 then stops.
I've been out of the hardware game for about 10 years so my knowledge is a little out of date.  

Are these differences in temperatures normal for the same CPU and cooler?
Should there be a difference in clock speed between the 2 systems?
Since I didn't set this up, I don't know if the same tech assembled both and used the same settings in bios.  To be honest, I'm so out of touch I'm not sure what bios settings should even be used anymore.

Any input would be appreciated before I head back to the store.

 

Thanks.
 

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3 minutes ago, JCCLCreations said:

Hey all.  Hoping I can get some advice on this.
The wife and I recently had 2 brand new systems built, the specs are exactly the same on both and we're getting some different temps and such.
On my wife's system, her idle temps sit around 27c with a 360 AIO.  I have the same AIO and my temps run at 38-41.  Same case, same fans, same cooler, all purchase from the same store.  The system was assembled by the store.
Full specs
12900K
ASUS Z690-P Motherboard
MSI 12 GB 3080
16 GB DDR 5 5200
Voltages from HWMonitor seems the same on both.  

Another odd ball thing is that my wife's system will not boost to the full 5.2 Ghz.  It hit 5183 then stops.
I've been out of the hardware game for about 10 years so my knowledge is a little out of date.  

Are these differences in temperatures normal for the same CPU and cooler?
Should there be a difference in clock speed between the 2 systems?
Since I didn't set this up, I don't know if the same tech assembled both and used the same settings in bios.  To be honest, I'm so out of touch I'm not sure what bios settings should even be used anymore.

Any input would be appreciated before I head back to the store.

 

Thanks.
 

No two CPUs are exactly the same so I wouldn't worry about it as long as you don't thermal throttle badly under load. Maybe your system is under just a tiny bit more load than your wives' system. As for the clock, the reference clock is rarely exactly 100.00 Mhz, mostly it's like 99.98 or something like that, that's why. Manufacturers just round up that number to make it look better because we like even numbers. Your PC needs a fixed clock so that it can make different variable clocks. Your MoBo just takes the base frequency and multiplies it to fit the different frequencies that your components run at

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@JCCLCreations

Use HWiNFO and check what low power C states are being used by both computers when they are idle. I am using ThrottleStop for this info but it does not fully support your 12900K. It still might give you some indication of any differences.

 

image.png.993639524604c3ff6d38c244966faa16.png

 

If both computers are running similar background tasks then you should see the same C state activity, more or less, on both computers. If your computers were set up by two different people, it is possible that one computer has different C states enabled in the bios compared to the other computer. 

 

A difference in clock speeds is another indication that these two computers are using different bios settings. 

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On 5/20/2022 at 1:36 PM, unclewebb said:

@JCCLCreations

Use HWiNFO and check what low power C states are being used by both computers when they are idle. I am using ThrottleStop for this info but it does not fully support your 12900K. It still might give you some indication of any differences.

 

image.png.993639524604c3ff6d38c244966faa16.png

 

If both computers are running similar background tasks then you should see the same C state activity, more or less, on both computers. If your computers were set up by two different people, it is possible that one computer has different C states enabled in the bios compared to the other computer. 

 

A difference in clock speeds is another indication that these two computers are using different bios settings. 

@unclewebb

I'm honestly at a loss here for what you're looking for but I hope this helps.
If this looks like a bios setting, which one of them is correct?  One of them runs a hell of a lot cooler for what seems like 17 mhz.  Would I just have to sit with both monitors side by side to look for bios differences or is there something glaring that would stand out.

Thanks for the input.
She seems to have the higher voltages but lower clock speeds and lower temp on her computer than I do on mine.  These things run so hot that 10c seems like quite a bit.

J

 

clocksJ.png

voltagesJ.png

ClocksC.png

VoltagesC.png

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@JCCLCreations

I think you are using HWMonitor which does not report C state data.

You need to run HWiNFO instead. 

 

image.png.297ce65882c3ddd1921479456ed0d2c7.png

 

My individual cores are spending 99.0% of the time in the low power C7 state. Idle temperatures should be very low when a CPU is in this state. If a bios setting has disabled some of the C states, that can increase the idle temperatures significantly. 

 

The percentage of time a CPU is spending in core C7 is the best indication of how much stuff is running in the background. There might be a vast difference between the two computers because of some background task that is constantly running on one computer but not on the other. 

 

The VID voltage in your screenshots is not a good indication of how much voltage is actually going to the CPU. In HWiNFO look for VCore voltage. When HWiNFO first starts up, check the Sensors Only box.

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20 minutes ago, unclewebb said:

@JCCLCreations

I think you are using HWMonitor which does not report C state data.

You need to run HWiNFO instead. 

 

image.png.297ce65882c3ddd1921479456ed0d2c7.png

 

My individual cores are spending 99.0% of the time in the low power C7 state. Idle temperatures should be very low when a CPU is in this state. If a bios setting has disabled some of the C states, that can increase the idle temperatures significantly. 

 

The percentage of time a CPU is spending in core C7 is the best indication of how much stuff is running in the background. There might be a vast difference between the two computers because of some background task that is constantly running on one computer but not on the other. 

 

The VID voltage in your screenshots is not a good indication of how much voltage is actually going to the CPU. In HWiNFO look for VCore voltage. When HWiNFO first starts up, check the Sensors Only box.

@unclewebb

Here is my C state info.

 

Cstate.png

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@JCCLCreations

My computer is showing a much higher average for time spent in C7. Compare both of your computers when they are both idle. Check the Task Manager and use the Details tab to see what is running in the background. 

 

A core will be in the C0 state when it is actively working on a task. You want that number to be as low as possible when idle and the C7 number to be as high as possible. 

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