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I am trying to understand this scenario: https://superuser.com/questions/1142617/what-happens-after-plugging-in-62-pin-power-cable-into-2x4pin-for-cpu-into-moth

 

According to one user: "if your PSU has OVP/UVP protection, then it will shut down that rail before the voltages go more or less than the socket needed (which I think it did with yours since everything is working)"

 

According to another: "The voltage regulator circuit (aka voltage regulator module) on your motherboard took the 'brunt' of the reversed polarity on the ground plane."

 

Is the PSU with such protections also protecting the motherboard from taking burn in such a scenario, or it only protects itself?

 

Many thanks.

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Buy a good quality psu, there is a list of the various Tier levels of quality.

A good psu will protect the mobo, a bad psu won't.

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1 hour ago, firstclick said:

I see, so OVP/UVP specifically prevents motherboard destruction?

No, OVP/UVP protects against Over/Under voltage conditions.
There's a variety of things it can protect, but it will never prevent destruction. In the cases of failure, it can protect other components from damage. For example, when my motherboard's VRM blew up, it saved my 3770K from +12 V Vcore, and it still runs today. The motherboard is damaged, still.

Main: AMD Ryzen 7 1700X, Nvidia GTX 780, 16 GB 2667 MT/s DDR4 Fedora 33 x86_64

Secondary: Intel Xeon X5670, Nvidia GTX 660, 24 GB 1333 MT/s DDR3 Windows 10 Home x86_64

Server: Intel Xeon X5670, 60 GB 1333 MT/s DDR3-R Ubuntu Server 20.04.1 LTS x86_64

Laptop: Intel Core i5-3320M, 16 GB 1600 MT/s DDR3 Fedora 32 x86_64

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15 minutes ago, svmlegacy said:

No, OVP/UVP protects against Over/Under voltage conditions.
There's a variety of things it can protect, but it will never prevent destruction. In the cases of failure, it can protect other components from damage. For example, when my motherboard's VRM blew up, it saved my 3770K from +12 V Vcore, and it still runs today. The motherboard is damaged, still.

I was talking specifically for the case of reversing polarity of 12v pins and ground pins, in the case of the psu detecting that, would it protect the motherboard?

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33 minutes ago, firstclick said:

I was talking specifically for the case of reversing polarity of 12v pins and ground pins, in the case of the psu detecting that, would it protect the motherboard?

Mixed connections cannot guarantee any protections.

Main: AMD Ryzen 7 1700X, Nvidia GTX 780, 16 GB 2667 MT/s DDR4 Fedora 33 x86_64

Secondary: Intel Xeon X5670, Nvidia GTX 660, 24 GB 1333 MT/s DDR3 Windows 10 Home x86_64

Server: Intel Xeon X5670, 60 GB 1333 MT/s DDR3-R Ubuntu Server 20.04.1 LTS x86_64

Laptop: Intel Core i5-3320M, 16 GB 1600 MT/s DDR3 Fedora 32 x86_64

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OVP/UVP has nothing to do with this scenario, it only prevents voltages on three PSU rails (12V, 5V, 3.3V) to go out of specs. PSU doesn't know when you supply the wrong voltage where it isn't supposed to by plugging the wrong cable, that's the work for motherboard VRM, but more than likely no motherboard would be able to do anything, it'll just fry.

Tag or quote me so i see your reply

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