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corsair hxi vs corsair rmi

Pretty much

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Posted · Original PosterOP

whats the difference between a corsair hx1000i and a corsair rm1000i besides efficiency curve

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You can configure OCP limits per rail on HX-i whereas RM-i simply has 'multi-rail OCP' switch 'On/Off' with predetermined limits when on. That's pretty much all, they're even almost the same inside AFAIK, aside for components that make up for efficiency.


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Posted · Original PosterOP
1 minute ago, Juular said:

You can configure OCP limits per rail on HX-i whereas RM-i simply has 'multi-rail OCP' switch 'On/Off' with predetermined limits when on.

sorry noob for this part. what is that used for

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9 minutes ago, truckerlenny1990 said:

sorry noob for this part. what is that used for

Every modern PSU has four main voltage rails, 12V, 5V, 5VSB and 3.3V. 3.3V rail isn't used much however nowadays. 12V is the main rail in modern PCs, all power hungry components are taking power from it. Most PSUs are still single-rail, which means that they have one huge 'stable' (marketing bullshit ensues) 12V rail (5V and 5VSB are always separate), so say if you have 1000W PSU then, the current limit on this single 12V rail would be about 110A (accounting for 30-40% headroom all PSUs have), that's a lot of current no single component needs but it poses some risk when things are getting shorted. So multi-rail PSUs split that physical single-rail (older PSUs were having multiple physical rails but these days are gone) into multiple virtual 12V rails with smaller current limits, say, about 40A which is about 480W and is more than enough to power any component out there which need just a single cable while reducing the risk of damage in case of short. Now, when it gets to shorting, even multi-rail PSU would probably not save a component or a cable that shorted out anyway but it has some chance to reduce the damage or not to start a fire since power it would pump in the short, depending on the PSU wattage would 2 to 3 times lower than with a single-rail PSU.


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Posted · Original PosterOP
2 minutes ago, Juular said:

Every modern PSU has four main voltage rails, 12V, 5V, 5VSB and 3.3V. 3.3V rail isn't used much however nowadays. 12V is the main rail in modern PCs, all power hungry components are taking power from it. Most PSUs are still single-rail, which means that they have one huge 'stable' (marketing bullshit ensues) 12V rail (5V and 5VSB are always separate), so say if you have 1000W PSU then, the current limit on this single 12V rail would be about 110A (accounting for 30-40% headroom all PSUs have), that's a lot of current no single component needs but it poses some risk when things are getting shorted. So multi-rail PSUs split that physical single-rail (older PSUs were having multiple physical rails but these days are gone) into multiple virtual 12V rails with smaller current limits, say, about 40A which is about 480W and is more than enough to power any component out there which need just a single cable while reducing the risk of damage in case of short.

so hx better rm worse (still good but worse than the hx)

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Just now, truckerlenny1990 said:

so hx better rm worse (still good but worse than the hx)

No, they're both multi-rail capable and configured as multi-rail by default. They are however, considering that you indeed need a 1000W PSU, better than single-rail PSUs with the same wattage.


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Posted · Original PosterOP
2 minutes ago, Juular said:

No, they're both multi-rail capable and configured as multi-rail by default. They are however, considering that you indeed need a 1000W PSU, better than single-rail PSUs with the same wattage.

so once again whats the benefit difference between a hxi and a rmi in noob terms considering there is a decent price difference

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3 minutes ago, truckerlenny1990 said:

so once again whats the benefit difference between a hxi and a rmi in noob terms considering there is a decent price difference

None if it's more than 5 bucks.


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Posted · Original PosterOP
1 minute ago, Juular said:

None if it's more than 5 bucks.

the hx1000i is $339 canadian, and the rm1000i is $269 canadian. hx is said to have better fan and better efficiency (idc about efficiency i dont pay electricity)  

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Fans are identical, efficiency would pay up for the price difference between them in the lifetime of this PSU only if you're doing some heavy workstation stuff on it frequently (or mining).


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Posted · Original PosterOP
1 minute ago, Juular said:

Fans are identical, efficiency would pay up for the price difference between them in the lifetime of this PSU only if you're doing some heavy workstation stuff on it frequently (or mining).

i dont pay for electricity so it wouldnt affect me. so it seems the rmi and hxi is identical except for efficiency and that other thing about ocp limits none of which i guess ill need so if i can get a rmi i will if not a hxi will do just fine. psu availablility is still horrible

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Posted · Original PosterOP
Just now, Juular said:

You can also op-out for cheaper PSUs, like Corsair's RM-x. Do you even need 1000W PSU to start with ?

i want the icue software as i am buying the corsair commander pro so alot of things will be controlled via icue. i know i could get away with a 850 watt psu but nothing wrong with some overkill

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