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Brenz

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About Brenz

  • Title
    Member

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    UK
  • Occupation
    Software Engineer

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  1. Actually using them and just getting as many different certificates as you can aren't the same thing, knowledge you don't use will soon be forgotten. Either way a few years of actual work experience far exceeds any cert especially with the pace of technology.
  2. Honestly you're wasting your time. The certificates you're going after aren't all that desirable and after a few years of not using them as good as worthless especially after getting unrelated certificates on top. Decide what you actually want to do, find a recognised educational course, complete it and get a job in that area. I lead a team of 5 for a FTSE 100 company and regularly interview software engineers, show me actual work experience any day!
  3. Experience > Qualifications. Get a degree to find your first job or start at a really small company that doesn't even require that and then work your way up learning as you go. Equally doing a job you actually want is worth a lot more than a job you applied for just because it pays more.
  4. Any government should be looking to protect the privacy of its citizens. Private companies in many cases hold more data about people than the government and it should be protected. Facebook may not have stolen any information but it would seem in some cases (Android call logs) they have collected more information than what was appropriate. PII (Personally Identifiable Information) covers a lot more than what you have listed. Anything that can be used to identify a person including a Name is PII. Yes GDPR doesn't come in until next month however its an extension to existing country specific data protection like the Data Protection Act 1998 in the UK and it could be argued that some of their current practices are not compliant such as the collection (and continued storage) of call and message logs. GDPR is hardly a joke, the fine is actually 4% of global annual turnover. So using Facebook's turnover last year a fine could be as much as $1.6 billion on on profits of $15.9 billion, that's over 10% plus potentially needing to pay compensation to individuals and prison sentences for executives. The fine is also calculated using turnover of the Ultimate Holding Company, so a breach in YouTube would be calculated based on turnover of Alphabet as a whole.
  5. A degree certainly isn't the perfect solution however actually being assessed goes a way towards identifying where people make mistakes and put them back on the correct path. The problem with learning online is there is too much incorrect or outdated information out there and people often end up going the wrong way and picking up bad habits. Yes the list is based on my experiences however I feel most of the wider points are valid. Yes any version control experience is great and you could replace Linux with Windows but the rest should be relevant in most companies and if they aren't they should be. Other qualifications/certifications can help as well as professional memberships. I'm a member of the BCS and have completed Certified Scrum Master training. Keeping skills up to date and learning new things is just as important once in a job.
  6. I have 3 Star Wars ducks on my desk
  7. Anyone can write code, the difficult bit is writing good code. Yes you can come up with some projects and put them on GitHub but who is to say the code is actually good? I graduated University ~4 years ago in the UK, started in an entry level role and now lead a team of software engineers in a FTSE 100 company. Truthfully when I'm interviewing we will rarely have anyone in without a qualification of some kind, a personal portfolio is a welcome addition but I've seen some awful stuff in some personal GitHub accounts but we have a few within our department who didn't get a software engineering degree and either started at a small company or started in a different department and learnt what they needed to move into Technology. As others have mentioned as well its not just about writing code, there are a number of other skills you need. I posted this list before but when interviewing I'm looking for all of these things: Code standards - Learn what good code is and stick to it Frameworks - Don't try reinventing the wheel. Cover front-end and back-end Databases - You need somewhere to store data. Look at query optimisation & replication Linux - You're going to be connecting to a Linux server using SSH at some point Security - Do not forget this! Know how to write secure code, stay up to date on the OWASP Top 10 and know what encryption is suitable and when to use it Software Development Methodologies Software Development Life Cycle Testing - Unit & Functional Continuous Automation / Delivery / Deployment Version Control - Git Other Standards - e.g PHP-FIG PSRs
  8. This doesn't require VM's. If its just a web app in a browser open a Private session to get an additional login or use a different browser. If its something you need to install and run just create multiple Windows users and use the Switch User functionality to switch between them. Using VMs for this is massive overkill and the performance will suck.
  9. So we should just stop teaching everything because people might forget it? I doubt they are teaching the intricate details of how any secure encryption method works however it's very useful to understand what cryptography is, how it works at a high level and how it should be used. Security should be a key focus of any computing course these days including cryptography and when I interview people for software engineering roles I expect them to be able to talk about it.
  10. Unless you go into Software Engineering where understanding cryptography is very useful
  11. Why not just compress the actual image files?
  12. Brenz

    Credit Help

    Whatever you do DO NOT lie on any credit application. You will get caught. All applications must be screened by law. When you apply for any line of credit they will check your credit history, as you have said you have no credit so this will come up blank, you also get screened against many other lists. Ultimately banks give out credit to people who can pay it back, with no income that is something you cannot do. Get a part time job that's paid directly into your account (no cash in hand) and start building credit.
  13. Education use means using the video itself for education. How would you be able to claim a Nickelodeon TV show randomly embedded on your site is for educational purposes. Why does it even need to be a TV Show or Film? There is plenty of non-copyrighted content available you could use.
  14. Yes its copyright infringement, don't do it. Just because someone else has doesn't mean you should.
  15. No, you won't be learning much on an iPad Pro. My best advice would be to not only learn how to write code. Cover these areas too: Code standards - Learn what good code is and stick to it Frameworks - Don't try reinventing the wheel. Cover front-end and back-end Databases - You need somewhere to store data. Look at query optimisation & replication Linux - You're going to be connecting to a Linux server using SSH at some point Security - Do not forget this! Know how to write secure code, stay up to date on the OWASP Top 10 and use Encryption where necessary Software Development Methodologies Software Development Life Cycyle Testing - Unit & Functional Continuous Automation / Delivery / Deployment Version Control - Git Other Standards - e.g PHP-FIG PSRs When I'm interviewing software engineers the last thing on my mind is your ability to write code, that will be done with a test. If you can't show me you know to a decent level at least a good proportion of the points above (especially security) then it's hard to offer a position.
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