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Brenz

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  1. Agree
    Brenz got a reaction from Mira Yurizaki in what are the top highest paid Technical Jobs?   
    Experience > Qualifications. Get a degree to find your first job or start at a really small company that doesn't even require that and then work your way up learning as you go.
     
    Equally doing a job you actually want is worth a lot more than a job you applied for just because it pays more.
  2. Informative
    Brenz got a reaction from wasab in Programming and employment   
    Anyone can write code, the difficult bit is writing good code. Yes you can come up with some projects and put them on GitHub but who is to say the code is actually good?
     
    I graduated University ~4 years ago in the UK, started in an entry level role and now lead a team of software engineers in a FTSE 100 company. Truthfully when I'm interviewing we will rarely have anyone in without a qualification of some kind, a personal portfolio is a welcome addition but I've seen some awful stuff in some personal GitHub accounts but we have a few within our department who didn't get a software engineering degree and either started at a small company or started in a different department and learnt what they needed to move into Technology.
     
    As others have mentioned as well its not just about writing code, there are a number of other skills you need. I posted this list before but when interviewing I'm looking for all of these things:
     
    Code standards - Learn what good code is and stick to it Frameworks - Don't try reinventing the wheel. Cover front-end and back-end Databases - You need somewhere to store data. Look at query optimisation & replication Linux - You're going to be connecting to a Linux server using SSH at some point Security - Do not forget this! Know how to write secure code, stay up to date on the OWASP Top 10 and know what encryption is suitable and when to use it  Software Development Methodologies Software Development Life Cycle Testing - Unit & Functional Continuous Automation / Delivery / Deployment Version Control - Git Other Standards - e.g PHP-FIG PSRs  
  3. Informative
    Brenz got a reaction from Samputio in Programming and employment   
    Anyone can write code, the difficult bit is writing good code. Yes you can come up with some projects and put them on GitHub but who is to say the code is actually good?
     
    I graduated University ~4 years ago in the UK, started in an entry level role and now lead a team of software engineers in a FTSE 100 company. Truthfully when I'm interviewing we will rarely have anyone in without a qualification of some kind, a personal portfolio is a welcome addition but I've seen some awful stuff in some personal GitHub accounts but we have a few within our department who didn't get a software engineering degree and either started at a small company or started in a different department and learnt what they needed to move into Technology.
     
    As others have mentioned as well its not just about writing code, there are a number of other skills you need. I posted this list before but when interviewing I'm looking for all of these things:
     
    Code standards - Learn what good code is and stick to it Frameworks - Don't try reinventing the wheel. Cover front-end and back-end Databases - You need somewhere to store data. Look at query optimisation & replication Linux - You're going to be connecting to a Linux server using SSH at some point Security - Do not forget this! Know how to write secure code, stay up to date on the OWASP Top 10 and know what encryption is suitable and when to use it  Software Development Methodologies Software Development Life Cycle Testing - Unit & Functional Continuous Automation / Delivery / Deployment Version Control - Git Other Standards - e.g PHP-FIG PSRs  
  4. Agree
    Brenz got a reaction from programmer in Programming and employment   
    Anyone can write code, the difficult bit is writing good code. Yes you can come up with some projects and put them on GitHub but who is to say the code is actually good?
     
    I graduated University ~4 years ago in the UK, started in an entry level role and now lead a team of software engineers in a FTSE 100 company. Truthfully when I'm interviewing we will rarely have anyone in without a qualification of some kind, a personal portfolio is a welcome addition but I've seen some awful stuff in some personal GitHub accounts but we have a few within our department who didn't get a software engineering degree and either started at a small company or started in a different department and learnt what they needed to move into Technology.
     
    As others have mentioned as well its not just about writing code, there are a number of other skills you need. I posted this list before but when interviewing I'm looking for all of these things:
     
    Code standards - Learn what good code is and stick to it Frameworks - Don't try reinventing the wheel. Cover front-end and back-end Databases - You need somewhere to store data. Look at query optimisation & replication Linux - You're going to be connecting to a Linux server using SSH at some point Security - Do not forget this! Know how to write secure code, stay up to date on the OWASP Top 10 and know what encryption is suitable and when to use it  Software Development Methodologies Software Development Life Cycle Testing - Unit & Functional Continuous Automation / Delivery / Deployment Version Control - Git Other Standards - e.g PHP-FIG PSRs  
  5. Informative
    Brenz got a reaction from Euphoria in Total noob question regarding 'Virtual Machines'   
    This doesn't require VM's. If its just a web app in a browser open a Private session to get an additional login or use a different browser. If its something you need to install and run just create multiple Windows users and use the Switch User functionality to switch between them.
     
    Using VMs for this is massive overkill and the performance will suck.
  6. Agree
    Brenz got a reaction from AluminiumTech in Credit Help   
    Whatever you do DO NOT lie on any credit application. You will get caught. All applications must be screened by law.
     
    When you apply for any line of credit they will check your credit history, as you have said you have no credit so this will come up blank, you also get screened against many other lists.
     
    Ultimately banks give out credit to people who can pay it back, with no income that is something you cannot do. Get a part time job that's paid directly into your account (no cash in hand) and start building credit.
  7. Agree
    Brenz got a reaction from [REDACTED] in what do i need to learn to become a full stack web developer   
    No, you won't be learning much on an iPad Pro.
     
    My best advice would be to not only learn how to write code. Cover these areas too:
    Code standards - Learn what good code is and stick to it Frameworks - Don't try reinventing the wheel. Cover front-end and back-end Databases - You need somewhere to store data. Look at query optimisation & replication Linux - You're going to be connecting to a Linux server using SSH at some point Security - Do not forget this! Know how to write secure code, stay up to date on the OWASP Top 10 and use Encryption where necessary Software Development Methodologies Software Development Life Cycyle Testing - Unit & Functional Continuous Automation / Delivery / Deployment Version Control - Git Other Standards - e.g PHP-FIG PSRs When I'm interviewing software engineers the last thing on my mind is your ability to write code, that will be done with a test. If you can't show me you know to a decent level at least a good proportion of the points above (especially security) then it's hard to offer a position.
  8. Agree
    Brenz got a reaction from Jirajha in what do i need to learn to become a full stack web developer   
    No, you won't be learning much on an iPad Pro.
     
    My best advice would be to not only learn how to write code. Cover these areas too:
    Code standards - Learn what good code is and stick to it Frameworks - Don't try reinventing the wheel. Cover front-end and back-end Databases - You need somewhere to store data. Look at query optimisation & replication Linux - You're going to be connecting to a Linux server using SSH at some point Security - Do not forget this! Know how to write secure code, stay up to date on the OWASP Top 10 and use Encryption where necessary Software Development Methodologies Software Development Life Cycyle Testing - Unit & Functional Continuous Automation / Delivery / Deployment Version Control - Git Other Standards - e.g PHP-FIG PSRs When I'm interviewing software engineers the last thing on my mind is your ability to write code, that will be done with a test. If you can't show me you know to a decent level at least a good proportion of the points above (especially security) then it's hard to offer a position.
  9. Agree
    Brenz got a reaction from leadeater in Help with Optic Fibre   
    Seriously for 70m just use CAT5e. You would literally be throwing money away to use fibre over such a sort distance especially when the switch you plan to use is no faster than CAT5e
  10. Agree
    Brenz got a reaction from Clechay in Run JavaScript in popup   
    This isn't true. Most browsers will place limits on what an inactive tab can do so as to not waste resources but Javascript will still be running
  11. Agree
    Brenz got a reaction from Octobyte in Windmill Automated Website Testing   
    Why do you want to use a tool that is no longer maintained or well documented?
     
    Use Selenium Webdriver instead, its the most popular and you can find loads of documentation and help online. 
  12. Agree
    Brenz got a reaction from vorticalbox in How to program an email bot   
    Seriously trying to sort your emails based on images is never going to work. Just use normal email rules to organise based on the sender, subject, keywords, etc like everyone else.
  13. Agree
    Brenz got a reaction from vanished in How to program an email bot   
    Seriously trying to sort your emails based on images is never going to work. Just use normal email rules to organise based on the sender, subject, keywords, etc like everyone else.
  14. Agree
    Brenz got a reaction from ShenaniganCoder in Help!   
    You can't use PHP for this. PHP is a server-side language, at best it can generate the HTML with inline CSS for a graph but you will probably need a Javascript based solution for this.
  15. Agree
    Brenz got a reaction from vorticalbox in Is there room in the industry for non-degreed, self-taught people?   
    Yes until you have actually worked in the industry everyone lacks experience but a degree at least shows you have been taught and tested to a certain level.
     
    I've seen quite a few times on here where people have counted since when they wrote their first "hello world" program as years of experience. It doesn't count unless its a year in full time employment. There is a reason many senior engineer jobs require 5 years experience, the saying goes it takes 10,000 hours to become an expert at something. Assuming you work a 40 hour week that works out at around 4.8 years.
  16. Agree
    Brenz got a reaction from Nineshadow in Crowes' Portfolio   
    You have made a good start but be careful of falling in to the trap where all your websites are essentially the same.
     
    All the ones you have shared here are basically identical with varying colours and images. You also need to be careful with your assets, some of the images I have seen are way too big for their use and therefore take a long time to load, crop images to the size needed, use sprites to lower the number of http requests and reduce loading times and optimise them for web usage.
  17. Agree
    Brenz got a reaction from KuJoe in Does this video tell the truth?   
    They really aren't. It's vastly cheaper to build a new structure designed with all the power, data and cooling exactly where you need it than it is to retrofit an old building.
     
    In the end the cost of the building is a lot less than the hardware inside.
  18. Like
    Brenz got a reaction from Ryokeen in Is there room in the industry for non-degreed, self-taught people?   
    There are certainly jobs out there, obviously your lack of qualifications and experience will mean you won't meet the requirements for many jobs at medium-large companies but there will still be jobs.
     
    I wouldn't recommend going freelance again because with your lack of experience you would really benefit from being part of an engineering team so you can read and review their code and actually learn more from them.
     
    Now you just need to teach yourself. Use your time to work on personal projects that you can eventually show to a potential employer and to help you learn.
  19. Agree
    Brenz got a reaction from DevBlox in Is there room in the industry for non-degreed, self-taught people?   
    There are certainly jobs out there, obviously your lack of qualifications and experience will mean you won't meet the requirements for many jobs at medium-large companies but there will still be jobs.
     
    I wouldn't recommend going freelance again because with your lack of experience you would really benefit from being part of an engineering team so you can read and review their code and actually learn more from them.
     
    Now you just need to teach yourself. Use your time to work on personal projects that you can eventually show to a potential employer and to help you learn.
  20. Like
    Brenz got a reaction from o0Martin in Fun with Rasberry Pi - Help?   
    I'm currently working on using a RPi 3 to make a Magic Mirror and also adding voice controls using Amazon Alexa. With the IFTTT support built in you could do whatever you wanted.
     
    I'm also using Web Sockets so while this Pi runs the server it means others (Like Pi Zero) could act as 'dumb' mirrors and simply receive the data pushed to it from the server. This has the extra bonus that all connected clients are perfectly in sync with each other.
     

  21. Like
    Brenz got a reaction from namarino in Computer Science Career   
    I graduated from university 2 years ago and have been working for a FTSE100 company as a PHP developer since then.
     
    As BrightCandle said this isn't a career where you can learn everything in education and work for the rest of your life. I actually learnt a huge amount when I started working, just being around other professional developers, reading and reviewing code is a great way to learn.
     
    When I started I pretty much just wrote code, now I've found myself branching out more taking part in working groups to review and improve processes, working on continuous integration, providing input on OS migrations and more server side discussions and even helping out with some high-performance computing and big data projects we have taking place in my office. While many of these things had been touched on at uni I now understand these technologies much more than before so it really pays off to put yourself forward to keep learning as much as possible.
     
    You can also find developer conferences to attend and institutes like the BCS here in the UK put on regular talks and presentations from industry experts which are a great way to widen your knowledge and meet other IT professionals.
  22. Like
    Brenz got a reaction from namarino in Computer Science Career   
    Personal projects are great and not something that you can put together in a few hours but a well built out and planned project where its clear you have really put in a lot of time and effort.
     
    The one thing employers really like to see is someone who isn't a 9 to 5 developer who is going to go home at the end of the day and never look at any code or new technology. You need to show you are passionate and that you have the drive to continue learning in your free time, you don't have to be working on their code outside of work but if you refuse to keep learning and keep on top of new developments you will fall behind and that's not what you or your employer want.
  23. Agree
    Brenz got a reaction from leadeater in Security Camera Server   
    Of course if someone is snooping around your property then call the police, you have CCTV of them acting suspiciously.
     
    Have you thought about getting a dog? It might not suit you but a dog can be a very good deterrent and their ability to hear noises outside would help catch them.
  24. Agree
    Brenz got a reaction from leadeater in Security Camera Server   
    Extra patrols in your area? Visible police presence is going to help and you have proof of people trespassing and acting suspiciously on your property.
     
    The only other option would be to pay for a 24h monitored security system so if any alarms were triggered they will call the police.
  25. Agree
    Brenz got a reaction from jameshumphries47 in classified website creation thread   
    The others are correct here. You may have more faith in your code but its likely to be much simpler and more vulnerable than the code made available by many frameworks which has not only been written by much more senior developers but also analysed and tested by hundreds of other developers and the code subsequently improved over many years.
     
    Also don't forget Unit tests, untested code is never good in the long run and likely has mistakes in it.
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