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NeoFrux

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About NeoFrux

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  1. Langley is a township in the Greater Vancouver area / Vancouver Metro - If you get a flight to Vancouver International (YVR), you can then get public transit to more or less anywhere in the area. Langley Regional Airport (YLY) is exactly what it sounds like - A small regional airport that supports general aviation only, so you won't find any flights to or from there.
  2. Oh, that's a good point, I never thought of- ... Oh. I had a big long post done up here, but that's pretty pointless at this stage. If you persist, I'm just going to go ahead and tune out. The OP wasn't looking for FUD, the OP was looking for answers. These are the answers. Does the OP need a new GPU? No. For Skyrim at 4K60 running anywhere close to 60? Sure. But that's not what the question was. The question was, verbatim, "Is there a cable that will do Display port from my 290x to the HDMI 2.0 port in the TV". The answer is yes, there is, yes, it will work, and no, it will not induce a loss of quality. @AshleyAshes has first-hand proof of that.
  3. You're clearly not reading anything that's being said, nor have you read the product reviews. Nearly every single review explicitly says that, yes, they got 4K60, 4:4:4. Most of the people who have issues with these adapters are the same types of people who have issues getting 4K60 4:4:4 to work via PC output at all, which is to say many UHD TVs will not allow it unless the input is labelled as PC (or other hoops have been jumped through, like @AshleyAshes' mention of the UHD Color option on Samsung). See also: AshleyAshes using this very setup.
  4. Got any examples of DP 1.2 to HDMI 2.0 adapters that do this? I mean, for that matter, the adapter you linked explicitly states that it is capable of all of the above, so the point is moot anyway and you're kind of arguing for the sake of arguing at this point.
  5. ... What are you even talking about? It's an active adapter that converts DP 1.2 to HDMI 2.0. It doesn't do anything but convert the transport layer from DisplayPort (packet-based) to HDMI (TMDS). It doesn't give two shits what type of data is passing through as long as it can interleave the video and audio. It's hilarious that you even thought to mention this, because the Club3D adapter you yourself linked explicitly specifies support for all of the above except for HDR (but does specify support for DP 1.4, which does have HDR support). DP 1.2 can do 4K, 4:4:4, and 10-bit, though not HDR; HDMI 2.0 is currently the only widely available standard that can do HDR 4K60. Converting from DP to HDMI does nothing to change the amount of bandwidth available on the link. You're still going to get everything DisplayPort 1.2 can do, which again includes 4K60, 4:4:4, and 10-bit. Not that much actually uses 10-bit to begin with, but there you go. Really the only thing you're missing out on versus a shiny new RX 4x0 or GeForce 10x0 is HDR. Considering not much uses that, either (certainly not Skyrim), it's not a big loss. A note, 4:4:4 refers to the YUV colour system, not RGB. The 290X should be able to spit out both either way.
  6. The latency such an adapter would cause is very likely to be less than a frame, and there is no loss in quality going from DisplayPort to HDMI (or DVI for that matter) or vice-versa. Shit be digital, yo.
  7. Handbrake will work, but will re-encode the file, which is time-consuming and reduces quality. There are frontends for ffmpeg out there, but it's easier to just grab it and run the command than it is to track down a decent one.
  8. ... Anyway, the solution to OP's request is to not use Adobe Media Encoder and instead use ffmpeg as described here. Not as elegant to use, but a far more elegant solution than re-encoding (and losing quality). It'll simply swap the container and leave the audio/video/subtitle data intact.
  9. Fingers crossed hoping that they manage to get through everything before the new year.
  10. Well, in Vancouver proper, sure. I've been digging into the cost of living in the greater Vancouver area like Surrey and Langley and it's not actually that bad at all. ... At least, it's pretty similar to here in St. John's.
  11. Probably, though the Google Forms application process would have weeded out a fair chunk of would-be applicants by virtue of not being legal to work in Canada. Then again, I wonder how many assumed they're legal to work in Canada?
  12. Yeah, from what I gather, LMG has basically had their fill of jumping through legal hoops after the Dennis work permit odyssey. It's not easy on the employer because they need to do a labour market impact assessment and basically get grilled by the government on why a Canadian couldn't fill the position instead. It seems like the "ideal point of entry" for a foreign worker looking to join LMG is to get a work permit and a job with a different employer first, or be an international student with a general work permit. As many Americans are finding, emigrating to Canada isn't exactly easy. At any rate, I don't expect any of the applicants will have heard back definitively yet. I don't know how many applications they've received, but I imagine it's a non-zero number with at least three digits; That many scripts is a little more than a weekend read. I'm personally hoping for the next "round" to start before Christmas, but that's wishful thinking on my part; @nicklmg is on record saying it'll probably be a couple of months before the dust settles, but that's in total. We'll have to see how things play out from here. At any rate, to everyone who applied, once again I wish you luck, and I wish @nicklmg and the rest of the team the least amount of sleep loss possible throughout this whole process. High-profile postings like this can't be easy to manage.
  13. I'd have to disagree there; CPU upgrades are rarely worth it on a per-generation basis, and while the *lake series of CPUs are supposed to have the same socket for 3 generations this time around, most of the time you're not going to even want to upgrade your CPU within that timeframe. High-end Ivy Bridge is still relevant performance-wise today; Hell, so is Sandy Bridge. Really, the major reason to upgrade your CPU, especially in the case of a high-end CPU like a 6700K, is because you're upgrading the platform as a whole for new features, meaning you're grabbing a new board to go along with it.
  14. Different priorities for different use cases, differing brand allegiances, day-to-day price changes (especially in the run-up to Black Friday) and all that. It's one of the beautiful things about building a PC, really; You get to choose exactly what goes into it and any given list online is more of a suggestion than a hard and fast rule. Disagreeing is totally fine and part of the process. If there were singular "best" configurations for each given price point, then there wouldn't be such a huge field of components to choose from in the first place.
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