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Why pick Intel?

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I don't understand why anybody would currently buy Intel CPUs, the Ryzen CPUs seem to have similar specs to Intel at a much lower price. For example a 6 core CPU comparison the AMD option is the Ryzen 5 2600 which is ~$200, the Intel option is the i5 8700(K) which is ~$300. The AMD option is $100 cheaper, similar clock speed, and can overclock, it seems that there is no advantage except if you already have an Intel motherboard. Or at the 8 core option AMD has the Ryzen 7 2700(X) which is ~$250, the Intel option is the i9-9900k which is ~$540. Also AMD chipsets support overclocking at lower prices. I see people often buying Intel CPUs especially the ones that I mentioned, I don't understand why you'd choose them currently. Is there something that I'm missing, people say that Intel CPUs have less cores at faster speeds, but the X variants of Ryzen have similar clock speeds and is still cheaper than Intel.

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3 minutes ago, Darpyface said:

it seems that there is no advantage except if you already have an Intel motherboard. 

This primarily for me. I mean I haven't upgraded my CPU in a few years so Ryzen wasn't even a thing when I built my PC. But a lot of users that might have e.g. a 7600 might want to get something more but don't want a new motherboard. Anyway I'd say this is the main reason :) 

 

Personally I'd definitely pick up a Ryzen if I were going to buy a new CPU + Mobo tomorrow. 

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Intel is better for adobe and cad as cad is mostly single core. 

 

Also high end gaming (9600k). 

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Only stuck with Intel because I won a giveaway, but honestly there's something to be said about wanting higher gaming performance.

I WILL find your ITX build thread, and I WILL recommend the SIlverstone Sugo SG13B

 

Primary PC:

i7 8086k (won) - EVGA Z370 Classified K - G.Skill Trident Z RGB - WD SN750 - Jedi Order Titan Xp - Hyper 212 Black (with RGB Riing flair) - EVGA G3 650W - dual booting Windows 10 and Linux - Black and green theme, Razer brainwashed me.

Draws 400 watts under max load, for reference.

 

Linux Proliant ML150 G6:

Dual Xeon X5560 - 24GB ECC DDR3 - GTX 750 TI - old Seagate 1.5TB HDD - dark mode Ubuntu (and Win7, cuz why not)

 

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In terms of price to performance, Ryzen wins right now. But once we start getting to overclocking, I've seen Intel go a lot higher. Look at the 8700k vs the 2600 for instance. I've seen the 8700k hit 5 to 5.2ghz stable on all cores while the 2600 can only get around 4.2 to 4.4ghz all cores.

print "Hello World!" ("Hello World!")

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13 minutes ago, Darpyface said:

but the X variants of Ryzen have similar clock speeds and is still cheaper than Intel.

Nope, Ryzen CPUs top out at around 4.3GHz when OC'd while Intel CPUs can easily go past 5.3GHz when OC'd, making them better for gaming and CAD.

 

And not everyone has a small budget, so those with deep pockets may pick a 9990K over a 2700x (just an example) for video editing, or an 8600K over a 2600 for gaming (also an example).

CPU: Intel Core i7-950 Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-X58A-UD3R CPU Cooler: NZXT HAVIK 140 RAM: Corsair Dominator DDR3-1600 (1x2GB), Crucial DDR3-1600 (2x4GB), Crucial Ballistix Sport DDR3-1600 (1x4GB) GPU: ASUS GeForce GTX 770 DirectCU II 2GB SSD: Samsung 860 EVO 2.5" 1TB HDDs: WD Green 3.5" 1TB, WD Blue 3.5" 1TB PSU: Corsair AX860i & CableMod ModFlex Cables Case: Fractal Design Meshify C TG (White) Fans: 2x Dynamic X2 GP-12 Monitors: LG 24GL600F, Samsung S24D390 Keyboard: Logitech G710+ Mouse: Logitech G502 Proteus Spectrum Mouse Pad: Steelseries QcK Audio: Bose SoundSport In-Ear Headphones

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2 hours ago, Darpyface said:

I don't understand why anybody would currently buy Intel CPUs, the Ryzen CPUs seem to have similar specs to Intel at a much lower price. For example a 6 core CPU comparison the AMD option is the Ryzen 5 2600 which is ~$200, the Intel option is the i5 8700(K) which is ~$300. The AMD option is $100 cheaper, similar clock speed, and can overclock, it seems that there is no advantage except if you already have an Intel motherboard. Or at the 8 core option AMD has the Ryzen 7 2700(X) which is ~$250, the Intel option is the i9-9900k which is ~$540. Also AMD chipsets support overclocking at lower prices. I see people often buying Intel CPUs especially the ones that I mentioned, I don't understand why you'd choose them currently. Is there something that I'm missing, people say that Intel CPUs have less cores at faster speeds, but the X variants of Ryzen have similar clock speeds and is still cheaper than Intel.

I find it easier to find high end intel cpus on the used market. Thats why i have one

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For a vast majority of people, Ryzen is a more reasonable because of the price to performance ratio.  Think about the most common topics just on this forum, so many of them revolve around building a quality gaming PC on a budget.  

 

The main reasons I chose Ryzen for my gaming PC build are, first, simply because had never used one before and I wanted to give it a try, and second while I don't HAVE to build my PC's on a budget, I am the type of person that will be very happy buying the upper mid tier of many tech devices because for my needs they work great.  While it would be neat to have top end system with a 9900k and a 2080TI, they would just be wasted on me.  I play a pretty big variety of games on my PC and my 1700x and/or Vega 56 have never had a problem running any of them.  So far, any issues I've had gaming were mistakes I've made learning.  

 

Now, if we are talking about my PC I built for my business of running a recording studio, then I bought the nicest stuff available at the time with the highers clock speed.  SO I got a 7700k for that build.  Every meaningful component on that build was considered "top end" at the time, ended up costing me a little over $2200 without even putting a GPU in it.  I certainly overpaid for what I needed on that PC, but it's something I needed to be rock steady for a long time.

 

So, long story short.  Just depends on the need.  IMO, for gaming, unless you're a hyper competitive gamer there really isn't a NEED to pay for a top end Intel CPU.  But hey, if you've got the cash, and you want to spend it that way, more power to ya.  I'm not judging anyone who does.  Its just not my style.  But, for other applications, it all depends on what the better choice will be. 

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