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memtest86 errors - acceptable?

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Go to solution Solved by mariushm,

Yeah, Corsair guy told you so it must be true.

 

It's a threadripper system.

It's 4 sticks at 16 GB each.

 

This means the advice for a desktop system with 2 memory sticks of 8-16 GB each isn't quite correct.

 

The more memory sticks you add, the harder it is for the memory controller(s) inside the processor to read the signals and correct errors that can happen at such high speeds. The higher the frequencies, the faster the signals go through traces on the motherboard into the cpu and the harder it is for the processor to correctly decode those signals.

With two memory sticks (typical configurations most people have at home), it's easier to push data around, with 4 memory sticks it's a bit more difficult. The quality of the motherboard (and how the traces between cpu socket and memory slots are layed out) matters a lot as well.

Officially, threadripper supports up to 2933 Mhz on motherboards that have only 4 memory slots... you'll have difficulty finding a threadripper board with only 4 memory slots (1 stick per channel), most motherboards have 8 slots. The simple presence of 4 empty slots can affect the signals enough to make AMD not guarantee that the CPU can work with memory at 2933 Mhz. 

With 4 sticks installed and 4 slots unused,the maximum guarantee is 2666 Mhz, anything else is "depends on motherboard quality and memory stick and timings you choose and voltage you use"

Even 3200 Mhz is more than what I would expect to work on Threadripper, and honestly anything more than 2933 Mhz brings so little performance increase that it may not be worth the hassle.

 

i meant memory voltage ... standard voltage is 1.2v , but most sticks are set on 1.35v when going over 2666 mhz. You can go a bit higher, but I wouldn't go above 1.4v... you shouldn't even have to go above 1.375v

 

You don't want any errors to show up there.  Imagine you're downloading a file from the internet, an installer for an application, and one byte gets corrupted in ram as the file is downloaded. You launch the installer, install the software, run the software and then randomly the application crashes because of that byte inside the executable that got corrupted. 

You could spend hours to days investigating why the software crashes, blaming your processor, your video card, other things, when the problem was a memory error at some point.

 

I've experienced some memory issues on a new build, memtest86 found 10 errors on 64gb of RAM. How bad is this?

 

FULL STORY

IN SHORT

After a forum suggestion of reducing memory speed the systems seems to run stable.

However, to make sure, I ran a full memtest86 scan. On 4x16gb sticks it found a total of 10 errors. The results are attached to this post.

The RAM is HyperX Fury DDR4 3466MHz

 

Now, I don't have any clue about how to read these results. I don't know if 10 errors are bad or no problem at all. 

Any help or comments would be appreciated :) 

 

IMG_20181218_210942.jpg

IMG_20181218_210946.jpg

MVIMG_20181218_210933.jpg

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To actually do some work on that pc, NO ERRORS are acceptable.

 

Reduce the memory frequency dude.

ffs what do you expect with so many memory sticks? 

 

Threadripper supports these configurations (officially)

 

single rank memory :

4 of 4: DDR4-2933

4 of 8: DDR4-2666

8 of 8: DDR4-2133

 

dual rank memory:

 

4 of 4: DDR4-2933

4 of 8: DDR4-2666

8 of 8: DDR4-1866

 

I would lower the frequency to 3200 Mhz

Run memtest again. If you still get errors, I would bump the voltage up a bit, let's say if the default voltage is 1.35v, I would bump it up to 1.375v

run memtest again. If you still get errors, lower the frequency to 3000 Mhz or 2933 Mhz. 

 

If you still get errors, pull out the sticks and test maybe 2 sticks at a time.  If you get errors still, most likely the memory stick is faulty.

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if you want to end up with corrupted files and system, sure dont worry about the errors

MSI GX660 + i7 920XM @ 2.8GHz + GTX 970M + Samsung SSD 830 256GB

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1 hour ago, mariushm said:

To actually do some work on that pc, NO ERRORS are acceptable.

 

Reduce the memory frequency dude.

ffs what do you expect with so many memory sticks? 

 

Threadripper supports these configurations (officially)

 

single rank memory :

4 of 4: DDR4-2933

4 of 8: DDR4-2666

8 of 8: DDR4-2133

 

dual rank memory:

 

4 of 4: DDR4-2933

4 of 8: DDR4-2666

8 of 8: DDR4-1866

 

I would lower the frequency to 3200 Mhz

Run memtest again. If you still get errors, I would bump the voltage up a bit, let's say if the default voltage is 1.35v, I would bump it up to 1.375v

run memtest again. If you still get errors, lower the frequency to 3000 Mhz or 2933 Mhz. 

 

If you still get errors, pull out the sticks and test maybe 2 sticks at a time.  If you get errors still, most likely the memory stick is faulty.

Cheers, @mariushm !
I don't expect anything - I'm a total newbie.

The test was performed with 3200 Mhz - or at least that's what I set it to in the BIOS - I know the "screenshots" of the memtest says otherwise..

 

Again: me being a newbie - Is the voltage you're referring to the SOC voltage?

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1 hour ago, Neftex said:

if you want to end up with corrupted files and system, sure dont worry about the errors

Buddy.. I'm asking a fair question here. It's pretty obvious I don't know the right answer: it's why I'm asking, after all. 

Some tests are "one fail and you're fucked"-kinda tests, others are "a few errors don't really matter"-kinda tests. I have no clue as to which of the two memtest86 is. I'm glad you do. Thanks

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Does are false positives.  It is bs ,, Corsair tech guy told me so.  I get 4 errors and probably more if I let it run,,, but my system has never crashed once due to a RAM issue and what not.

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Yeah, Corsair guy told you so it must be true.

 

It's a threadripper system.

It's 4 sticks at 16 GB each.

 

This means the advice for a desktop system with 2 memory sticks of 8-16 GB each isn't quite correct.

 

The more memory sticks you add, the harder it is for the memory controller(s) inside the processor to read the signals and correct errors that can happen at such high speeds. The higher the frequencies, the faster the signals go through traces on the motherboard into the cpu and the harder it is for the processor to correctly decode those signals.

With two memory sticks (typical configurations most people have at home), it's easier to push data around, with 4 memory sticks it's a bit more difficult. The quality of the motherboard (and how the traces between cpu socket and memory slots are layed out) matters a lot as well.

Officially, threadripper supports up to 2933 Mhz on motherboards that have only 4 memory slots... you'll have difficulty finding a threadripper board with only 4 memory slots (1 stick per channel), most motherboards have 8 slots. The simple presence of 4 empty slots can affect the signals enough to make AMD not guarantee that the CPU can work with memory at 2933 Mhz. 

With 4 sticks installed and 4 slots unused,the maximum guarantee is 2666 Mhz, anything else is "depends on motherboard quality and memory stick and timings you choose and voltage you use"

Even 3200 Mhz is more than what I would expect to work on Threadripper, and honestly anything more than 2933 Mhz brings so little performance increase that it may not be worth the hassle.

 

i meant memory voltage ... standard voltage is 1.2v , but most sticks are set on 1.35v when going over 2666 mhz. You can go a bit higher, but I wouldn't go above 1.4v... you shouldn't even have to go above 1.375v

 

You don't want any errors to show up there.  Imagine you're downloading a file from the internet, an installer for an application, and one byte gets corrupted in ram as the file is downloaded. You launch the installer, install the software, run the software and then randomly the application crashes because of that byte inside the executable that got corrupted. 

You could spend hours to days investigating why the software crashes, blaming your processor, your video card, other things, when the problem was a memory error at some point.

 

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9 minutes ago, mariushm said:

Yeah, Corsair guy told you so it must be true.

 

It's a threadripper system.

It's 4 sticks at 16 GB each.

 

This means the advice for a desktop system with 2 memory sticks of 8-16 GB each isn't quite correct.

 

The more memory sticks you add, the harder it is for the memory controller(s) inside the processor to read the signals and correct errors that can happen at such high speeds. The higher the frequencies, the faster the signals go through traces on the motherboard into the cpu and the harder it is for the processor to correctly decode those signals.

With two memory sticks (typical configurations most people have at home), it's easier to push data around, with 4 memory sticks it's a bit more difficult. The quality of the motherboard (and how the traces between cpu socket and memory slots are layed out) matters a lot as well.

Officially, threadripper supports up to 2933 Mhz on motherboards that have only 4 memory slots... you'll have difficulty finding a threadripper board with only 4 memory slots (1 stick per channel), most motherboards have 8 slots. The simple presence of 4 empty slots can affect the signals enough to make AMD not guarantee that the CPU can work with memory at 2933 Mhz. 

With 4 sticks installed and 4 slots unused,the maximum guarantee is 2666 Mhz, anything else is "depends on motherboard quality and memory stick and timings you choose and voltage you use"

Even 3200 Mhz is more than what I would expect to work on Threadripper, and honestly anything more than 2933 Mhz brings so little performance increase that it may not be worth the hassle.

 

i meant memory voltage ... standard voltage is 1.2v , but most sticks are set on 1.35v when going over 2666 mhz. You can go a bit higher, but I wouldn't go above 1.4v... you shouldn't even have to go above 1.375v

 

You don't want any errors to show up there.  Imagine you're downloading a file from the internet, an installer for an application, and one byte gets corrupted in ram as the file is downloaded. You launch the installer, install the software, run the software and then randomly the application crashes because of that byte inside the executable that got corrupted. 

You could spend hours to days investigating why the software crashes, blaming your processor, your video card, other things, when the problem was a memory error at some point.

 

Dude - epic reply!
Thank you so much, buddy. This made everything very clear! I will dump the speeds down to 2666 and run the test again :) 
Thanks for taking the time, @mariushm

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To me, if you value what is in the computer, no no error is aceptable.

Imagine that a windwos update swith a pair if bits while itt is downloadings.... hmm you can get a SO that will not boot anymore. Try to recover, and the files get corrupted on the fly...

if it was a kind of sandbox, the you can risk, but just because it is some sort of playground to mess files that loads again fresh from every boot.

Try reducen the number of sticks, reducen freq, relax timings, and increase voltage. Try to isolate if it is just one faulty stick.

 

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Great news!
After another full run of memtest86 - with RAM speed set to 2666 Mhz - we've got a perfect test score!

 

Thank you so much to everyone who replied, and especially @mariushm who really made things clear for me :) 

IMG_20181219_140527.jpg

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I don't like that it says 117C for Temp on the screenshot.  Also, does 2666 MHz translate to 14.47 GB/s on the RAM?  I'm running 2x8GB 2133 MHz DDR3 and I saw 20.07 GB/s.

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3 minutes ago, Swarlos said:

I don't like that it says 117C for Temp on the screenshot.  Also, does 2666 MHz translate to 14.47 GB/s on the RAM?  I'm running 2x8GB 2133 MHz DDR3 and I saw 20.07 GB/s.

I can't imagine it being right - during stress tests I rarely cross 62c..
As for the second part of your question I have no clue - pretty sure someone else around here would be able to tell us ;)

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Yes, to me al cache speeds seems to low too. Maybe its me that im uses to intel speeds, but if i remember my 8700k L1 was about 300ish Gb/s and i had the image of the 3600 cl16 gskill just under 30Gb/s.

 

Looks if any other similar system posted its memtest just to compare if you are in the mean of the sistem specs of that hardware.

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