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Wombo

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About Wombo

  • Title
    The Networking God Has Spoken

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  1. I've seen issues in the past with some of the ASUS suite of tools. If you installed any of these I would try removing them for the time being. Specifically the issue I saw in the past was related to AISuite which was causing the router/AIO to reboot whenever the PC was on. An easy test is turning the PC on and enable safe mode with networking. If this works just fine it's likely an application or process causing the issue.
  2. Wombo

    packet tracer exam

    Here are two packet tracer labs I used to practice back when I took my CCNA. If you can complete all the tasks you should be all set for the real exam as it is slightly more complex than anything you are likely to encounter for this level. I have also included the completed topology, in the event you need it for reference. I should also note these were last updated in late 2014 and haven't been revised for the latest revision of the CCNA R&S, but most of the topics should be there. Cisco2SBAJune2014Configured.pkt Cisco2SBAJune2014.pkt Edit: Forgot to quote! @ilyas001
  3. Wombo

    3 MILLION SUBSCRIBER GIVEAWAY

    New Razer Blade all the way!
  4. Wombo

    40% Packet loss...

    Can we please see some traceroute results.
  5. Wombo

    BGP on a Cisco 7200

    I would not recommend BGP for this. BGP is not meant to be an IGP and really shouldn't be looked at as a protocol that supplies any kind of reliable failover. BGP is for route replication across the entire internet, by design it is VERY slow because of this. If your network is segmented into spans no greater than 8 devices in a chain you should be good to stay with layer 2 protocols such as STP. If you branch out to anything larger I would recommend going to a routed layer 3 design with a good IGP such as OSPF, IS-IS or even EIGRP if you find enough platforms that support it. If complexity is low you should stay with Layer2. As complexity increases, move to a layer 3 design that bridges the layer 2 segments together and handles the routing/redundancy. As spans increase, implement optics (layer 1). As you start to get into a larger network designs all 3 elements will have to be considered. The most typical modern service provider designs will involve layer 2 for transport and layer 3 for routing/redundancy with optics spanning the long haul. As an example, modern service provider MPLS networks involve layer 2 transport, typically Ethernet, with routing choices for these layer 2 frames performed via higher levels protocols such as OSPF at layer 3 for finding the best path between nodes. One way I like to think about it is every time you step closer in the network view you go deeper by 1 layer. At a high-level you have the layer 3 routed design showing the paths between nodes and peers (Ex. router-router). As you go in deeper you see the layer 2 paths between the network elements, typically the MPLS paths for forwarding traffic between layer 3 devices. Going deeper yet you find the layer 1 paths between your devices, these would be the physical optical links, or in this case, wireless shots. BGP, as its name implies, should really only be used at the network border for route advertisement and replication to the greater internet. BGP is not an IGP.
  6. Availability of 150 on their network, not reliability or up time. I'll update my post for more clarity.
  7. Wombo

    How do ISPs limit speed?

    See Rate Limiting, primarily what is often referred to as Policing. As per wiki; "In computer networks, rate limiting is used to control the rate of traffic sent or received by a network interface controller. It can be induced by the network protocol stack of the sender due to a received ECN-marked packet and also by the network scheduler of any router along the way." "The recipient of traffic that has been policed will observe packet loss distributed throughout periods when incoming traffic exceeded the contract."
  8. Despite being called "Optik" the services provided by Telus under that branding are not guaranteed to be transported over fibre optics and Telus will tell you that no such correlation is being implied despite the naming convention. Got to love marketing... Telus infrastructure for residential (and even enterprise sadly) is mostly old copper telephone lines. While it is true these do give you a slightly higher degree of separation from other users they are also a lot more susceptible to issues caused by the legacy technologies used for transport over these lines, not to mention the fact the lines are extremely dated and are prone to physical issues themselves. Additionally, your traffic is almost guaranteed to be aggregated with others past what is called the HLU, so the separation doesn't go too far. Cable technologies, or DOCSIS, have come a long way over the years. It is true the bandwidth is shared however the number of channels available on DOCSIS 3.1 systems makes this somewhat of a mute point. You're dealing with bandwidths in the tens of Gbps on a single multi channel bonding. Don't look for this being offered anytime soon, but DOCSIS 3.1 is boasting throughput of over 10Gbps to individual subscribers over short/medium distances. As a bit of information I've gathered over the years, all of Shaw's cable nodes are FTTN, this is often called hybrid fibre/coax. Each node then has redundant fibre uplinks to a larger cable chassis that routes traffic over a larger fibre backbone, and ultimately to the internet. The individual coaxial cable runs themselves are not that long. To go back to the OP's point about the offerings, if we want to compare Shaw to Telus, the two major ISP's in Western Canada, Telus can barely offer 150 to 15% of their users. Shaw is reporting the service is available on over 98% of their network, with the total number of nodes showing signs of saturation at 0.03%. Enjoy
  9. Wombo

    Wifi Bugged and I Have no clue

    Not really a bug, that's just the limitations of WiFi. You can try; Choosing a more open channel, try to stay on either 1, 6 or 11. Moving your Wireless AP into a more open area Removing obstructions between your WiFi antenna and the WiFi AP If your AP supports it, replace the antennas for ones with a larger gain/power If your AP has multiple antennas, orientate them to be at 90degrees to each-other (if one is vertical, place the other horizontal, if you have 3, angle one in between)
  10. Wombo

    Wifi Bugged and I Have no clue

    Not really a bug, that's just the limitations of WiFi. You can try; Choosing a more open channel, try to stay on either 1, 6 or 11. Moving your Wireless AP into a more open area Removing obstructions between your WiFi antenna and the WiFi AP If your AP supports it, replace the antennas for ones with a larger gain/power If your AP has multiple antennas, orientate them to be at 90degrees to each-other (if one is vertical, place the other horizontal, if you have 3, angle one in between)
  11. Wombo

    Managed switch

    I would just buy a regular unmanaged switch. While the managed one will likely have more features that could be used in the future if you ever needed them, the added price premium isn't going to be worth it if you don't plan on using those features. Avoid hubs/dumb switches as they will introduce an excess of issues and will degrade network performance.
  12. Wombo

    Managed switch

    That would be managed switch, unmanaged switch, and hub/dumb switch.
  13. Wombo

    Managed switch

    Switches make intelligent forwarding decisions based on layer 2, typically mac address. A hub has no concept of addresses of any kind and just broadcasts everything out every port whenever it receives a frame. Even that is technically incorrect as they doesn't even understand frames, they only understand electrical impulses and how to replicate them. Hense why some people call them dumb switches because they can be used in place of a switch but they have no intelligence whatsoever and are, well, a dumb choice as they effective make full-duplex communication impossible.
  14. Wombo

    Managed switch

    Managed Switch > Unmanaged Switch > Dumb Switch A "dumb switch" is a hub, not a switch at all.
  15. Wombo

    Snort

    Short answer, yes. I'm really not sure if snort can do this, but then again I've never gone deep into it, so it may be possible.
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