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Making a software RAID 0

Slaps_Only
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I have a few spare HDD that I want to RAID together to make a single large 'high speed' game drive. I saw windows 10 has 'storage spaces' but from my light research it looks like it's not as efficient as an actual RAID 0 array. What tools would I need to start a software based array? Also in this scenario, would a hardware RAID make more sense?

 

I have windows 10 installed on a 240 ssd with some other programs, and I currently have a HDD installed for my games right now. Would I still need to reinstall windows 10 before I start (I can I would just rather not)?

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Check these steps, I know it says Server 2003 but the steps are the same with Windows Disk Management: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/323433/how-to-establish-a-striped-volume-raid-0-in-windows-server-2003

 

Then what  you need to know is that the drives must be the same size and speed, that's why it is recommended to use to identical units... When you set up a RAID array 0 yo double the capacity of the slowest and smallest unit, so if one drive is bigger, that extra space/performance will not be used by the array and thus a waste of extra room and transfer rates.

Seagate Technology | Official Forums Team

IronWolf Drives for NAS Applications - SkyHawk Drives for Surveillance Applications - BarraCuda Drives for PC & Gaming

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3 hours ago, seagate_surfer said:

Check these steps, I know it says Server 2003 but the steps are the same with Windows Disk Management: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/323433/how-to-establish-a-striped-volume-raid-0-in-windows-server-2003

 

Then what  you need to know is that the drives must be the same size and speed, that's why it is recommended to use to identical units... When you set up a RAID array 0 yo double the capacity of the slowest and smallest unit, so if one drive is bigger, that extra space/performance will not be used by the array and thus a waste of extra room and transfer rates.

Thank you I'll start there!

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You are welcome! Of course there are third party tools to help you do this, useful for when the Windows Disk Management behaves weird. The Disk management doesn't explicitly say "RAID" under their selection options, they call them Spanned, Striped and Mirrored, check this image for visual aid and these two links for explanations on how to use these options and what type of RAID is each one of them:

-How to mirror the system and boot partition (RAID1) in Windows Server 2003

-How to use the Disk Management Snap-in to manage Basic and Dynamic Disks in Windows Server 2003 

 

Image result for types of raid disk management

 

 

 

 

 

Seagate Technology | Official Forums Team

IronWolf Drives for NAS Applications - SkyHawk Drives for Surveillance Applications - BarraCuda Drives for PC & Gaming

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