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daveholland86

Member
  • Content Count

    79
  • Joined

  • Last visited

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About daveholland86

  • Title
    Member

Contact Methods

  • Xbox Live
    ChuckEffNorris

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Phoenix, AZ
  • Interests
    Aviation, Tech
  • Occupation
    Commercial Pilot

System

  • CPU
    i5-9300h
  • Motherboard
    Asus ROG Strix G
  • RAM
    16gb
  • GPU
    1660 Ti (Mobile)
  • Storage
    XPG SX8200 Pro, Vulkan 2.5"
  • Display(s)
    120hz 1080p
  • Mouse
    Steelseries
  • Operating System
    Win 10
  • Laptop
    Asus ROG GL531GU

Recent Profile Visitors

94 profile views
  1. The Asus has cooled VRMs with the heat sink. There is also a cooling pad that can be used to push air into the vents.
  2. Yes I was going to low temp solder, but then everything else is low temp soldered to the heat pipes. In short that means I will desolder everything else to solder a water pipe on there. I got some thermal pads under the tubes now and it helped lower it a couple more degrees C. Idle is ~45c and max load is about 70c.
  3. With the new enclosure I am seeing about 5c lower temps over the jar water loop. The fan is more powerful and I have increased flow with the two pumps. I am actually now having a hard time keeping the water res sealed. It will stay sealed with no leaks for a day or two but then develop a leak. Maybe I have finally got it sealed this time, we will see. I also finally put a copper loop on my Asus Strix and I am seeing about 60C under load. Its cool enough the fans never kick on over idle. The case is also very tight, but I was able to get the back panel back on where I just have a hose running out of the computer.
  4. I would use a pressure switch. You can get a bunch of them for around $30. What you can do is wire it so that when the pressure is low (a leak) it will shut off. There are various ones you can buy that will have all that set. You just wire it up on a switch to bypass so you can start the loop. Once the loop is started, flick the switch and it will shut off when a drop in PSI is detected. VDO makes a bunch of them. You will have to test your current PSI to select a sensor that is just below your pressure. You would wire it up by selected a closed PSI switch and have the main power come from the sensor to you pump with a bypass of board power to the pump for turning the whole system on. Then when you are up to PSI, deactivate the power bypass and the pump power will be supplied from the sensor. Should only need a one pole switch as they both will share the common ground in the power supply. I am not sure of the PSI of these loops, but ideally you would want one the same exact as the PSI of your system. 10 PSI switch for a 10 PSI system. That way it will be the most sensitive to any leaks or changes in pressure.
  5. Sealing up the Water Res, which I found was a complete pain, about 5x more the silicone on here than I thought was going to be required. Water fill test, leak, water fill test, leak, repeat about 5 times until it held. Hard lines. They were heated and bent using an insert and do no restrict flow. Looking good and went together as planned. Just not planned was the small spaces and my large hands. Completed version and it works. Probably the new higher CFM and pressure fan, but I am getting now consistently 2c lower than my setup before. The idea of this project is to be portable, or more so exchangeable. I have multiple laptops and while not in use, the cooling unit will run on my Plex machine. With the quick disconnects on the laptops and the cooler unit, I can hook it up to anyone I am using at the time if I don't want excessive fan noise while gaming or working.
  6. It came out so much better than expected. I almost feel I should be working in a design job. The dickbutt is for Linus.
  7. Storing Lithium batteries at a full charge is bad, that can also kill the battery. A battery going into known long term storage needs to be at 50% charge or it can and will damage the cells.
  8. To me the good intersection on price, performance, quality, and ease is an Acer Aspire of Swift Ryzen. They support NVMe and have a 2.5" bay for cheaper SSD or multi TB HDD. I am not so quick to give up the 2.5" yet.
  9. The only reason to run Mac is if you want a really solid web browsing book. It's better than all the other Chromebooks in its category.
  10. Just me again, everyone know where I stand with this conundrum of Ryzen laptops they launched. Who ever designed the single Dimm Ryzen board, needs to be fired.
  11. You can get an i7 9750 and 1660 Ti for $1000. The rest depends on what design you like. I would avoid any AMD GPU, you get a Ryzen then shoot your foot with an AMD card.
  12. Perfect observation, my old MSI is a GE60, the one I am water cooling now. No the 531 isnt, but for me coming from the GE60 it night and day. It doesnt throttle and doesnt even run high fan most of the time gaming. I am also water cooling this one too, just got done bending the hard line pipes for it.
  13. Amazon has the Swift Ryzen 7. https://www.amazon.com/Acer-Octa-Core-Processor-Fingerprint-SF314-42-R9YN/dp/B086KKKT15/ref=sr_1_16?dchild=1&keywords=aspire+5+ryzen+5&qid=1594937503&sr=8-16
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