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Ginz

Member
  • Content Count

    147
  • Joined

  • Last visited

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1 Follower

About Ginz

  • Title
    Junior Member
  • Birthday 1994-11-03

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Christchurch, New Zealand

System

  • CPU
    Intel i7 2600K @4.2GHz
  • Motherboard
    ASRock Fatal1ty Z68 Professional Gen3
  • RAM
    4x4GB G.Skill RipjawsX CL11 2133MHz
  • GPU
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970
  • Case
    Cooler Master HAF 912
  • Storage
    Samsung Evo 500GB SSD, 2TB Seagate Barracuda Green, 2TB Seagate Barracuda, 1TB Seagate Barracuda
  • PSU
    Corsair RM750
  • Display(s)
    ASUS ProArt PA238Q, AOC G2460PQU
  • Cooling
    Cooler Master Hyper 212 +
  • Keyboard
    Corsair K95 (Cherry MX Red) with a dead LEDs
  • Mouse
    Razer DeathAdder Chroma
  • Sound
    ASUS Xonar DGX, Sony MDR-1R MK2 Headphones, Logitech z506 Speakers
  • Operating System
    Windows 10
  1. Try to check eBay or your local equivalent for ex-lease/decommissioned servers. You can find deals for a lot cheaper than buying brand new hardware. I managed to build a server with dual Xeon L5640 with 48GB of RAM for about $250-300USD from parts.
  2. Try port 53, as DNS uses both TCP and UDP so both are unlikely to be blocked. Edit: just read you aren't connecting to your vpn, but a vpn provider.
  3. Tried public dns servers? E.g 8.8.8.8, 8.8.4.4
  4. Thanks, that's the approach I'm using at the moment, but it's not very efficient and I may miss out learning some things.
  5. I just bought a Junpier EX2200-24T-4G to learn how to use the Juniper CLI. Are there any recommended tutorials/guides/courses on learning Junos?
  6. You could always run ZFS on Linux (ZOL) and spin up some containers or vms to handle file sharing, vpn, reverse proxy, media streaming, cloud storage. Proxmox would be an easy solution for this, and it's fun to learn how to do all these things.
  7. If you're heading down the networking path, I'd definitely recommend learning and using Linux for your home server
  8. Not sure then sorry , I run my OpenVPN server on linux
  9. Have you added firewall rules allowing traffic between your LAN and your OpenVPN interfaces?
  10. Add a route in your OpenVPN config
  11. Ginz

    Ping spieks

    I have stumbled into a problem which I cannot solve. I am currently having ping spikes to my second server (2x Xeon L5640, Genuine Intel I350-T4 NIC) which is running Proxmox (Debian Jessie). I am currently connecting through the I350, and only 1 VM is online at the moment, which is a pfSense VM. The I350 is not using PCI-E passthrough, just bridged ports. This setup used to work fine (for months), but now I am getting random ping spikes which I can't figure out where they're from. C:\Users\jonny>ping 192.168.1.3 /n 12 Pinging 192.168.1.3 with 32 bytes of data: Reply from 192.168.1.3: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.3: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.3: bytes=32 time=158ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.3: bytes=32 time=260ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.3: bytes=32 time=42ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.3: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.3: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.3: bytes=32 time=13ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.3: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.3: bytes=32 time=169ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.3: bytes=32 time=6ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.3: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64 Ping statistics for 192.168.1.3: Packets: Sent = 12, Received = 12, Lost = 0 (0% loss), Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds: Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 260ms, Average = 54ms C:\Users\jonny>ping 192.168.1.1 /n 12 Pinging 192.168.1.1 with 32 bytes of data: Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64 Ping statistics for 192.168.1.1: Packets: Sent = 12, Received = 12, Lost = 0 (0% loss), Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds: Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms Pinging other devices on the network works fine and is not spiking. Pinging from another device to the server still spikes. My other Proxmox server (Xeon 1225v3) doesn't have this issue. I've tried rebooting, and tried using my SuperMicro Intel network interfaces, but it hasn't fixed it. CPU usage is at 1-2% out of the 12 cores, 24 threads. Load average is at 0.5 I'm only using 2GB/32GB RAM. Almost no I/O usage. Network traffic is low (like ~2mbps). Ports are connected at 1Gbps
  12. Hey, I have a pfSense set up so that I can route specific hosts/networks through a VPN connected on the pfSense router. When the VPN is disconnected, these hosts/networks have their connection blocked. I also have it configured so that these hosts/networks are still able to communicate between local networks. All other traffic goes through my Default Gateway (my WAN connection). Do you want me to explain how this works?
  13. Wow that's pretty impressive projection size for such a short distance away
  14. I would suggest using ECC ram with a ZFS filesystem (I am using ZFS on Linux atm) with raidz or raidz2 (note that for raidz, I would recommend using 5 drives, and 6 drives for raidz2). You can run a hypervisor such as Proxmox and then virtualise your different servers in separate VMs or containers.
  15. Try sudo apt-get install openssh-server If that is already installed, then try connect the vm to itself using ssh. ssh 192.168.1.128 Edit: Ignore me, didn't read properly, it's probably your ISP blocking it. What you can try do is set your router to port forward a different port, e.g. 45000 to port 22 on 192.168.1.128 and then ssh to your external IP with port 45000
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