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RadiatingLight

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About RadiatingLight

  • Title
    Testing... 123

System

  • CPU
    Intel Core I7 4770K
  • Motherboard
    GIGABYTE Z87-HD3
  • RAM
    2X 8GB DDR3
  • GPU
    GTX 1070 STRIX
  • Case
    Corsair Crystal 460X RGB
  • Storage
    220GB Sandisk SSD
  • PSU
    Corsair RM750X
  • Display(s)
    ViewSonic 1080p 24''
  • Cooling
    NZXT Kraken X62 (With 120mm Fans)
  • Keyboard
    Corsair K95 Cherry MX Brown
  • Mouse
    Corsair M65
  • Operating System
    Windows 10

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Bay Area

Recent Profile Visitors

3,334 profile views
  1. custom loop kraken

    I'd never trust any system that janky ever. proper fittings are a must for water near thousand-dollar PCs
  2. Build for Friend

    Sucks. He'll be getting a much worse PC becuase of it. maybe tell him to wait until B360 or H310 motherboards are availible (early 2018 i think), since those will save you lots of money if he wants one now, then he will suffer a significant hit in framerate and overall performance by going with a Z370 motherboard. (or in the case of this build, I just went over budget) but this would be the build that I would begrudgingly reccomend for such an unfortunate scenario PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant CPU: Intel - Core i3-8100 3.6GHz Quad-Core Processor ($125.89 @ B&H) Motherboard: Gigabyte - Z370 HD3 (rev. 1.0) ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($111.49 @ SuperBiiz) Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR4-2800 Memory ($74.99 @ Newegg) Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($41.77 @ OutletPC) Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1060 3GB 3GB SC GAMING Video Card ($189.99 @ B&H) Case: Azza - SIRIUS ATX Mid Tower Case ($33.98 @ Newegg) Power Supply: Corsair - CX (2017) 450W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($39.99 @ Amazon) Total: $618.10 Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-17 21:04 EST-0500
  3. Build for Friend

    at least a 1060 3GB. and that one is pretty efficient, so basically anything will be fine. if you have some spare budget, try go for a dual-fan card, but any 1060 3GB will be fine. ideally, a 1060 6GB would be best (or RX 480/580) used 980 would be a good option used 980Ti is great, but probably costs too much. if you can get one, go for it (note that with a 980Ti, you'll need a bigger PSU (550W+) TBH that's more than you need with such a tight budget. 450W is more than enough for what you need (unless buying a 980Ti, in which case it could probably still run the system, but would be under lots of load) I have a link in my sig "you don't need a big PSU" that you should watch to see how little power modern components really use. then go to PC Partpicker, sort monitors by 1080p, and IPS, then choose the cheapest one.
  4. Build for Friend

    Well, you do know the space. I'm sure he's never heard of NZXT before, or G.skill, or EVGA, etc. but since you're helping him pick, you're the expert. AMD is a great company which makes solid products. the fact that he's never heard of them doesn't mean that they're bad in any way.
  5. Build for Friend

    in 4-5 years, intel will have already switched sockets twice, with the coffee lake platform being in the same spot as haswell right now. by contrast, AMD will have much better CPUs on their AM4 platform in 4-5 years, even though they too will switch sockets by then.
  6. Build for Friend

    +1
  7. Build for Friend

    I'd reccomend this: PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1400 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($147.79 @ SuperBiiz) Motherboard: ASRock - AB350M Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard ($50.98 @ Newegg) Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR4-2800 Memory ($74.99 @ Newegg) Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($41.77 @ OutletPC) Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1060 3GB 3GB SC GAMING Video Card ($189.99 @ B&H) Case: DIYPC - DIY-F2-O MicroATX Mini Tower Case ($40.98 @ Newegg) Power Supply: Corsair - CX (2017) 450W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($39.99 @ Amazon) Total: $586.49 Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-17 20:49 EST-0500 Trust me, Ryzen is not fringe hardware. it's stable, and works very well. it might've been unstable/fringe for the first month, but it's very well established.
  8. Build for Friend

    What's the budget? (Ryzen 1400 would be cheaper and better than i3 8100 IMO)
  9. custom loop kraken

    Nope
  10. AFAIK only devices connected to the router should be slowed
  11. Which GTX 1080 Ti?

    I'd personally buy EVGA because I like them, but all these cards will be great.
  12. Random Story About a Card

    Have you tried to DDU and reinstall all drivers? (GTX 960 is a better card than the 550 though)
  13. what's the difference?

    Imaging creates a 1 to 1 copy of your entire drive, incuding the registry, installed programs, windows itself, etc. it's usually used for moving an OS to another computer. software backup usually only backs up files, which takes up much less space, and has cool features like versioning. it's most useful for most people. but if you loose your PC, an image can restore seamlessly, and a backup only keeps the files you chose to back up.
  14. i dont know what to call my question

    ..You just described an overall speedup though. faster boot times are nice, but the faster program launch times make your PC faster, so yes, SSDs do make PCs faster. plus, program launches aren't limited to full programs like chrome. even opening the start menu, or task manager, or clicking on the UI runs a mini-program, which is accelerated with an SSD. but if you're taking about game performance, then an SSD won't change anything.
  15. i dont know what to call my question

    That's what almost everyone does. Most people (including me) have a smaller OS drive (for windows, essential programs, etc.) that's about 250GB (or 120 if you're on a budget, or 500GB if you have money to spare). and then a larger HDD for games, movies, etc. that's usually 1-3TB, but can be bigger if you really need. you just need to set the default install location for steam (and origin, uplay, etc.) to D: instead of C: and you're golden.
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