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skywake

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About skywake

  • Title
    Veteran

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  • Location
    Perth, Australia

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    Ryzen 5 - 3600X
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    16GB
  • GPU
    1660Ti
  • Display(s)
    2x 22" 1080p

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  1. Who cares, you have a phone don't you? It makes a far better mp3 player. Same deal with Netflix. If you care about either of these things in any way you have devices that perform these functions already Complaining that the Switch doesn't have these things is like writing a review on a toaster: "1 star, on my sandwich press I can also scramble eggs on the hotplate"
  2. Yeah, if you don't know that you need the expansion options you probably don't need them. Honestly most people can get away with a pretty entry level board as long as it's compatible with the CPU you are looking at. I personally would go a tiny bit above bargain basement just to get an extra 2 RAM slots and a second x16 PCIe slot (even if it's wired for x8) purely for a bit of expansion piece of mind.
  3. @handymanshandle @Kawaii Koneko Again, I don't disagree with what you're saying it's just that we're all looking at this with full hindsight. Sony didn't go with CDs with the games you are quoting in mind, these games wouldn't have even been in development at that point. The truth is that the Playstation was a lower cost, lower spec piece of hardware overall and the decision to go with CDs was just another way it was a cheaper platform. The capacity advantage was just a side-bonus. I'm not saying they were on the right side of it in the end, of course they weren't. What I'm saying is that they gambled with a higher spec, higher cost platform and it didn't pay off. That in the end people cared more about cheaper games, impressive cutscenes and CD-Audio soundtracks than fast load times and superior visuals. In the same way that you might argue people cared more about motion controls than early-HD gaming with the Wii. Or that arguably people care more about a console that's also portable than 4K and VR today. I know it has been done to death in this thread and others but I don't think those old definitions have any meaning anymore. Nintendo didn't bow out of one market or another, at least not anymore than they already had with the Wii. They shifted the window. Instead of a "home console" and a "portable" they have something that is functionally portable but with the size of game that used to be reserved for "home" consoles. But they still have two platforms they're developing for as part of this new strategy was also to start releasing mobile games.
  4. Can I just point out the irony of making this point in this thread? I mean, I don't disagree with what you're saying but we're talking about a desire for Nintendo to go "all out" with a high spec console, despite higher costs. The decision to use cartridges on the N64 is almost a case study in why that's not always a good idea. Cartridges were significantly more expensive than CDs but there were, and still are, huge performance advantages sticking to cartridges. We're talking 20-200x faster read speeds on the N64 vs PS. But as you said, in the end the 10x + lower capacity and the "gimmicks" of CD like FMV allowed different kinds of games to be made. Nintendo went for the higher cost "proven" tech and it didn't pay off. And I think that's pretty much dominated Nintendo's thinking since. The Wii and DS were under-powered compared to their competitors, the definition of low tech consoles. But they allowed for new kinds of games to be made. The Wii U did the same and failed but you can see Nintendo still approaching the market in the same way. Same with the Switch, the Switch isn't trying to be a super high spec console. The Switch is really just the inevitable result of the rise of power of mobile chipsets over the last decade. But what Nintendo were able to see was that this rise in mobile power was a largely untapped market for gaming. If Nintendo was still approaching the market like they were in the mid 90s the Switch wouldn't have existed. We would have instead got.... well whatever Microsoft and Sony are doing next.
  5. I wouldn't hold my breath for newer optical media standards as we more-or-less just got a new one a few years ago with UHD BluRay. And with UHD BluRay we're at the point now where we have a format that exceeds the quality that movies are usually captured at and more or less exceeds the spec of any TV you can buy. In terms of relevance to PCs? I think it's only something that matters if you have a large collection of BluRays already and want to copy them to some network attached storage. That's the only reason I can think of why you'd want an optical drive on a PC in 2019. And for that any BluRay drive will do unless you're specifically wanting to get into UHD discs. If you're just wanting to causally watch a couple of movies? Use a streaming service or buy a BluRay player....
  6. Probably blasphemy for this forum but surely there's a point at which more horsepower doesn't really matter anymore. Obviously the Switch isn't the point where we can say that and especially not when connected to a 4K 55"+ TV..... but at 720p in handheld mode? It's getting pretty close. And this is for a device that has what at this point is basically a 4 year old mobile processor in it. Even in PC gaming in the last 5 years or so we suddenly stopped talking about 1080p/60fps because that target is almost universally achievable. Now we talk about mid range cards being a good value for 1440p or some light 4K gaming. It really wasn't that long ago that portable gaming was almost exclusively 2D with sub standard-definition screen resolutions and high end PC gaming was the latest titles at 1080p/60fps. Now portable consoles are the latest titles at 720p/30fps and high end PC gaming is the latest titles at 4K 60fps+ So yeah, basically.... this question would have been far more potent 10 years ago. We're at the point now where the question I'd ask is why are Sony and Microsoft making powerful consoles when they could make something like a gen2 version of the Switch.
  7. Actually there are almost twice as many games on the Switch than there are on the 3DS and as others have said the 3DS is basically dead at this point. It may be different in other regions but none of the bigger shops here have it in stock anymore, at least not new. And I can see 5 games released for it in the last year looking on metacritic. Even on quality the Switch wins hands down. As much as I like the 3DS' library the Switch has incredible depth beyond the first party staples. The 3DS you brought for Zelda, Smash Bros, Mario Kart, Pokemon and Animal Crossing. The Switch has that.... but also Overwatch, Skyrim, Rocket League, Bayonetta, Okami, Diablo, Doom, Transistor, Thumper, Dark Souls, Overcooked, Witcher 3. The Switch is like if the Wii U, 3DS and Vita had a baby and that baby was selling well and attracting third party support
  8. Been Nintendo + PC since forever given that, to be blunt, Nintendo is the only platform that offers something drastically different to PC. Especially since the start of the HD era. Over the last 15 years we've gone from a world where basically everything was exclusive to a world where basically everything is multi-plat. So, aside from old "gaming" PCs I still have.... - Gameboy - Gameboy Color - DS Lite - 3DS - 3DS XL - SNES - Wii - Wii U - Switch I only have my Switch plugged and/or charged and ready to go ATM. Everything else is in a box. But I do have a SNES Mini plugged into my TV as well as the Steam Link app. Other than this, my TV is pretty much Switch only and will remain so for a while. If you are wondering about the gaps, growing up my brother was more into Sony/Sega so he took those consoles: - Sega Master System - Playstation - Playstation 2 and I guess for completeness on his side I guess technically my Niece has: - GBA - DS Lite - 3DS - Wii - 360 - PS4 - Switch Dude, you're just making anyone over 20 feel old.
  9. As others have said gaming in and of itself isn't going to chew up much bandwidth. But you really want more bandwidth for downloading the games themselves as well as updates etc. Also consider the fact that if you have a very slow connection and someone is watching Netflix or something your pings will skyrocket. So while you might only need a few Mbps for the game itself you want a fair amount of headroom. I'd say 10Mbps is the bare minimum as it's enough that an update can start without killing your pings. In terms of how that number scales with additional people? It's not quite as simple as saying that "10Mbps is the min for one, 20Mbps is required for 2". Bandwidth requirements per user follows more of a curve because of the way that spikey nature of network traffic. Kinda like how much traffic a highway needs to support for a given number of people you know are going to use it week to week. It doesn't need to support ALL of that traffic in one burst because people are going to leave at different times etc. Watch your network traffic while loading a youtube video for example, you will see that after buffering the first section most of the time your connection is idle. There are a whole bunch of variables you can throw at it but at a quick guess, it'd probably look something like this:
  10. Not really a like for like comparison though, relatively speaking the PS4 wasn't as low spec or priced as a 2200G at launch. The fairer comparison would be to say something like good luck playing AAA games on a 2600 with a GTX1660 in 2025. Something at a similar price now to what the PS4 was at launch. Consoles may have a good 6 years in them but typically it's ~6 years from launch, not 6 years from time of purchase. Really this is kinda the main difference in price/performance between the two models. And I say model rather than platform because the PS4 and XBOne are basically PCs at this point anyway. Both of them have about a 5 year shelf life for "playing AAA games" because both models demand a 5 year upgrade cycle if you want to keep in touch with the newest titles. The difference is the console model locks you into the manufacturer's cycle while the PC gaming model is constantly moving. Consoles start out being far better value for money but over time that balance shifts back to PC. Almost like clockwork I've upgraded my PC every 5 years since I was in High School (Duron -> A64 -> Core2Duo -> i5 -> Ryzen 5). I've never really brought into the "PCs are upgradable" bit because for me it's pretty much always an entire platform change anyway. So "upgradability" isn't something I use as an advantage. What is an advantage is that I can choose when to upgrade, whenever that is, and still have a relatively decent platform for 5 years. If I was to buy a PS4 right now? Even if it was the Pro SKU it's already quite a bit behind and odds are in two years there will be new games that it can't play. So yeah, if you don't care about any of the productivity side of PCs and just care about gaming? Buying a console near launch isn't much different from buying a comparably priced PC. The problem is that with console gaming launch day not the day of your purchase is when the clock starts ticking
  11. True, but on all sides not just on PC. And even within a platform people will mindlessly defend one option over another because of time/money/emotion invested. Quite litterally what being a mindless fanboy is. When people have locked themselves into something they will naturally defend and justify that decision after the fact. The Wii U litterally has a Wii built in for full backwards compatibility. But it's somewhat limited in what it can do and, officially, can't play Gamecube games. I assume because it lacks the memory card slots and Gamecube controller ports. They also stripped GC compatibility from all of the later versions of the Wii for the same reason. But it's definitely something that people have enabled via homebrew. Not sure if it's reading the discs themselves or off a HDD but.....
  12. Technically the cable categories are just a measure of bandwidth over distance so it's a bit more complicated than that. The numbers you are quoting here are for 100m which is quite a bit longer than what you'd expect in a typical run for a house. Yes Cat5e for 1Gbps speeds because it easily meets the spec and is basically the cheapest cable you can get. But for "future proofing" to 10Gbps in a typical house you can probably get away with Cat6 rather than Cat6e because in a typical house you runs will be well under 50m. And Cat7 is complete a waste of time, don't bother with it. With that said @Rhaemond is only talking about connecting to the internet so all of this discussion is completely useless anyways. Even if they had a super fantastic internet connection I highly doubt they're going to anywhere near saturating 1Gbps. Hell, even if they have a file server and are asking about transferring files, even then the value of 10Gbps at this stage is pretty slim. Put simply, anyone who is unsure about what cable they should get? Very unlikely they'll know enough to actually be able to take advantage of 10Gbps so probably best to just go with Cat5e.
  13. It's easy to get lost in the "this brand performs better" talk. The reality is that at specific price points there isn't really much of a gap between any of them. Whether that's AMD vs Intel or AMD vs Nvidia. Even when AMD's CPUs were super bellow par, they were super bellow par at significantly lower price points. With consoles there's also the fact that they can probably get a better deal if they go with AMD for both CPU & GPU than they would if they were AMD/NVidia, Intel/NVidia or Intel/AMD. So it kinda makes sense that in the generations since AMD acquired Radeon (2006, post R&D phase for the Wii/360/PS3 gen) it's been pretty much entirely AMD/AMD with the exception of the Switch with its Nvidia SoC. The Wii U was PPC based. Easy to laugh at it now with 20:20 hindsight but when you take your head back to ~2010 when they made that choice you can see why. By going PPC they maintained full backwards compatibility with Wii. They also made it easier for companies to port from 360/PS3 at a time when the PS3/XBOne were still a few years away. One of the many things that bit them in the end but... still worth remembering
  14. I love the idea of portable displays but I kinda struggle to find the use case. The only thing I can really think of that'd work for me is taking it on holidays for media consumption. The bit in this video where they were playing mobile games in particular looked pretty compelling..... But then I remembered that: 1. I have a small tablet for this purpose 2. Pretty much all holiday destinations have a TV with a free HDMI anyways 3. I have a Switch which is FAR more compelling for portable gaming than a phone connected to a screen ..... now if I was into camping? Then sure. If I was always on the road? Then sure. But it's a hard sell anyways
  15. The only way I'd bother "future proofing" for 10Gbps is with cabling if you're doing any kind of permanent cable run. Of course as tech enthusiasts we sometimes do things because we can rather than because we need it, particularly for personal use. But 10Gbps is a really tough sell ATM. Pricing it out just now it'd cost me at least $500AU for me to have 10Gbps between two of my machines (2x 10Gbps NICs and a switch with 2x 10Gbps ports). In reality it'd actually cost a lot more because I'm ignoring the fact that my NAS isn't upgradable in terms of networking capabilities so I'd have to buy/build a new one of those also. And for what advantage? After I rip a BluRay it would take ~10 seconds to copy to the NAS instead of ~2mins? Sure that'd be cool and I'd laugh manically everytime I wanted to copy a file. And you can bet your ass I'm looking forward to the day it becomes the standard. But in terms of "fun" how much is that actually worth? Probably not hundreds of dollars. I'd get far more "fun" value out of buying some higher spec access points or adding some security cameras to my network. Or buying something else entirely, pretty much anything else really.
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