Jump to content

DogKnight

Member
  • Content count

    47
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Awards


This user doesn't have any awards

About DogKnight

  • Title
    Member
  1. What certification is good for entry-level IT jobs?

    May be worth having a read through comments on a previous thread similar to this. Essentially, my advice is to work out what type of job you want to be doing. If you want to be configuring routers and switches all day, follow the Cisco path. If you want to work in security, find courses in that domain. Don't do a course because you think it will lead to a job. Find out what type of job you want, then do courses that work towards it. You may want to spend some time speaking to people working in different roles to understand what their average day is like. Another tip, there are lots of people with good I.T skills. If you want to differentiate yourself, have business knowledge and know how to communicate to a variety of different stakeholders.
  2. Its a pity because I still consider my 2011 iMac quite capable. Obviously its a little sluggish these days, but I don't use it for gaming so it does the trick just fine. - i7 2600 - 16gb RAM - Radeon 6970m 2gb - 500gb SSD + 4TB SSHD - Thunderbolt dock for USB 3 I am holding off replacing it until Apple bring out the new 'modular' Mac Pro. If it's to my liking and not exponentially expensive (obviously it will come with some Apple tax, I don't want this to spark a dollar value comparison), then hopefully it will provide a suitable upgrade path. Can't bring myself to buy a computer I can't repair / upgrade at all. I can accept certain limitations but RAM, Storage and in a pro machine, GPU, should be user up-gradable. Then I should be able to get a Mac that will last me at least another 5 years. There is just not any current hardware offering I am interested in. And while I use both platforms, I have had a mac as my primary computer since Mac OS 7 days.
  3. If you want to build foundation networking knowledge, something like Network+ from CompTIA may be better. The CCNA R&S is a good course for getting better understanding beyond Network+ but remember it is vendor specific. And while Cisco is probably the most popular network equipment in corporate IT, it is not the only one. Think about your desired destination and type of job. With so many organisations moving to virtualised, hybrid or cloud based datacentres, most networking you do in these environments won't be Cisco specific. Unless of course you are working at the datacentre itself. I went down the path of studying networking when I was younger because it was an area of interest. I did my CCNA back when there was only one version. While it was useful knowledge on networking in general, I ended up going down a different path as configuring routers and switches all day was not that appealing. So I haven't gone into a Cisco router config in over 10 years. I now work in IT Security instead. Talk to lots of people in the industry. Especially those in the roles you imagine yourself doing. Find out what their average day is like and work out if it is for you.
  4. good 2011-3 options for home server?

    I use a 5820k in my home server. Mine is primarily for VMs. Honestly, I am finding RAM the primary limitation at the moment. With only 32gb, it tends to fill up way before the CPU gets close to max. I will be upgrading it to 64gb of RAM at some point when prices become more reasonable. I think a 5820k is going to be fine. Would spend any extra cash on RAM.
  5. 5820k overclocked to 4.5GHz

    Yeah, hate to say it but that is nothing over the top. But good on you if its your first attempt at overclocking. Seems stable and good temps. Before mine was used as a server, I had it running at 4.3ghz for a year on air cooling alone.
  6. 5b02ba3fd4bd8_dabbingpikachu.png.cb49ee4ea19446ea1ca58d1b855581b3.pngbless you

  7. [FIXED] WI-FI FREEZES every 5 MINUETS!

    Would also suggest checking what channels your WIFI is using. If your neighbors are broadcasting on the same channel, it can cause interruptions to your signal. Also, if it's a 2.4ghz WIFI signal, that wireless spectrum is smaller and more congested than the 5ghz spectrum. So a change in router may be beneficial.
  8. Annoying internet drop-out that's lasted a month+

    It's definitely not a certainty, but a possibility. Try using a free DNS like Cloudflares option - https://1.1.1.1/ Or Google's DNS - 8.8.8.8 Takes seconds to change and something you can test while waiting on the NIC.
  9. readyNASduo worth it in 2018?

    Perfectly fine for data storage. Won't transcode anything for Plex. For $50, its a good price IMO. Still has gigabit ethernet and USB 3. NAS enclosures aren't cheap currently. For an old NAS, I have a Netgear Stora that is getting quite old. Performance always sucked. It was a spontaneous purchase when I should have looked into it. However these older NAS systems can have homebrew systems installed and, (at least used to) have quite a modding community around them. Either way, I don't use it anymore, just there for emergencies. Have a ReadyNAS 314 now which I am very happy with.
  10. persuade parents to let me get a server.

    As others have said, you need to help them understand your motives, you want to learn by experience. If IT is a potential career path for you, than hands on experience with setting up, breaking, troubleshooting, fixing, etc, can be a great learning tool. Sometimes when explaining technical topics to people not versed in that area can be difficult. Analogies are helpful with this. From what you said, their primary concern is over potential visibility of what you are doing on that Server. Maybe they are concerned you are viewing pornography or something. I can't think of too many other examples as to what they may be concerned about, if you have more information, it may help. And if you are running a Linux system, there really if no way you can satisfy this concern of theirs. The best bet is to be rational about it. Help them understand your reasons for wanting it (as a learning tool). Express top them that you are a couple years off being an adult, where you could make any of these decisions for yourself. Let them know you'll only be accessing it through your existing computer so they can look over your shoulder at any time. Some people are afraid of what they don't understand. But unless they have an interest, this is one area they will never fully understand. Most importantly, don't give them any reason to doubt you or not trust you. I work in IT now. I wouldn't have the knowledge and experience I have today if my parents did not give me the freedom to explore computer systems when I was younger. Not only the freedom, but they supported me in any way they could. I have no doubt in my mind that their support has been instrumental to my career.
  11. Ds218+ Won’t recognise 6tb + rant

    It is also worth mentioning that a drive not being 'supported', does not always mean it will not work. Sometimes this just refers to drives they have tested and guarantee to work. Some manufacturers come out with unique solutions that may not work properly or may require special software to function. Possible example could be SSHD's. I have found that the supported drive list has been updated over time on at least one of my NAS units. My ReadyNAS only 'supported' 4TB drives at time of release. It now officially supports 10TB drives. Whether they would work on 4 year old firmware, or whether recent updates enabled the functionality, I am not sure. Usually though it is firmware/software related. Sometimes its not updated because the device is old, sometimes its because they don't deem it necessary. Going off the compatibility list for your device, it appears they support 6TB Toshiba NAS drives. So it may be a limitation with enterprise class drives. Perhaps it is due to limits on power draw between these drives? I'm just throwing some random thoughts out here, I haven't looked into this. Surprisingly though, it supports 8TB Toshiba Enterprise drives (or at least one SKU). Support List: https://www.synology.com/en-global/compatibility?search_by=products&model=DS218%2B&category=hdds&p=2 HDD can be different. They all conform to a set of standards, but they can vary greatly. Capacity, cache, spin speed, SSD, etc. That is like saying how come a current Volkswagen won't allow me to put wheels on it from Toyota. I can put Audi wheels on it. Why are they only allowing some wheels to work on my VW and not other brands? Okay, that was a bit of an over the top example, but hopefully you get where I am coming from. PS: I am fully aware VW and Audi are both part of the VAG in case someone tries to nitpick this And Synology provided from day one a drive compatibility list. Any company has the right to say which parts will work with their products. This is not an essential service. If you chose to purchase a drive outside of their specs and it doesn't work, that is not their fault in any way. Not trying to be an asshole, just hoping to shed a different light on the matter.
  12. Annoying internet drop-out that's lasted a month+

    I agree with Zagna. Try a different NIC first. If it is your motherboard, it could just be the built in NIC and this could resolve the issue for a lot less cost. Also check any other local settings like DNS. Are you using your ISP's DNS or another option? If these steps don't help, try reformat your PC first before buying a new motherboard. You'll probably want to reformat with a motherboard change so no harm in trying this step first. Be very selective in what you install, keep it to the absolute bare minimum to test a stream. Be careful with installing any NIC/LAN management/booster utilities, even if they are vendor supplied.
  13. Connecting two Houses

    Or consider sharing an internet connection. Switch to just the one connection, upgrade it to handle usage and share the cost. Then you just have the one network running and it's a simpler approach. Alternatively, add a second NIC to your server to allow access that way.
  14. Docsis PCI?

    Does your internet go down that often? I am using a DOCSIS 3 connection in the way I mentioned above. Probably only go to the modem once a year at most. And when it happens I just plug a lan cable into it from a laptop. Maybe I am just lucky with a stable connection, but DOCSIS connections are usually quite stable from my experience.
×