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krkevin

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About krkevin

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    Member

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Metro Vancouver, B.C
  • Interests
    Technology, gaming, drawing, movies, photography, and food.
  • Biography
    Hi.
  • Occupation
    Human

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    MX Master
  • Operating System
    Windows 10

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  1. Swappable Popgrips on https://www.popsockets.com allow wireless charging, but it saids on the site that you have to remove the PopTop. So, as long as you're ok with this idea, you should be fine.
  2. I agree that your tip can help damage from splashes, but how about full submersion? What if that small splash comes in contact with the water damage indicator and voids the warranty? You mentioned phones, but not tablets. The method you are recommending has never been widely recommended by anyone, therefore has no guarantee it will work like actual water-resistance.
  3. One option I can recommend is getting a waterproof case. Here are some: https://ebookfriendly.com/waterproof-tablet-ereader-cases/ Umm, probably not a good idea to try that to add water-resistance. A tablet that originally isn't water-resistant, can never be water-resistant as easily as that.
  4. If your an average consumer, you don't need more than one phone. iOS features like Facetime can be convenient to have, but Facetime isn't the only video calling app on iOS. I personally don't think you should get a side device of any kind, and find another option. There are apps that are on both Android and iOS which can be used cross-platform like Facebook Messenger. I recommend either sticking with Android, or switching to iOS entirely. I don't think having both is a realistic option, whether you can afford it or not. The only kind of people I know that own multiple phones are Tech Reviewers. It's their job to review multiple phones, so it makes sense for them, but not for average consumers. I recommend not getting a side device and sticking with your current phone. If you really want to have a side device, I recommend getting something that isn't a phone, like a tablet.
  5. Definately S9+. Some Reasons: -much thinner bezels -significantly higher resolution that can also be adjusted to save power -way more features like Always On Display and Stereo Speakers -usually cheaper I personally use a Galaxy S9, it's not comparable to iPhone 8's mediocre and outdated specs.
  6. In some way, yes. The only downside is the massive coverage difference. https://www.unrealmobile.com/coverage https://www.verizonwireless.com/featured/better-matters/?map=4glte#maps I don't live in the US, but I know there is a carrier here in B.C called Freedom Mobile, which offers extremely cheap plan prices compared to mainstream carriers such as Bell or even Fido. Despite the extremely cheap deals Freedom Mobile offers, I will never go with them due to their poor coverage area. I'd rather pay a little more for a good plan and good coverage, but still not paying extreme prices such as $80+ a month. So in conclusion, the two carriers you listed most likely won't be able to be compared against mainstream carriers. Cheap can be better sometimes, but prices that cheap are a waste of money.
  7. Try restarting your phone. Also, which choice did you check? "Over Wi-Fi only" or "Over any network"?
  8. I own a Samsung branded wireless charger. This one: https://www.samsung.com/us/mobile/mobile-accessories/phones/fast-charging-stand---black-ep-n5100tbegus/ It takes roughly 2h 30m for a full charge, and also makes a bit of noise that can be heard when sleeping in silence. It's very convenient, but I rarely use it due to it's noise at night. Also, Samsung branded wireless charges aren't cheap either. As long as you're getting a branded wireless charger (Samsung or brands like Belkin and Spigen), you should be fine. People buy wireless chargers for the convenience, not the speed. Do not buy no-name wireless chargers, or any no-name charger for that matter. No-name chargers can damage the hardware very easily, since they're not designed as well as branded chargers. You don't want that expensive phone to be damaged by a $10 wireless charger and end up paying hundreds to fix it.
  9. If you want to backup "Everything", backup software such as Titatnium Backup will do it for you. I forgot to tell you one thing though, you need to root your device for third party backup software to work, not worth the risk in my opinion. Rooting voids warranty and can very easily make your software completely unusable. Besides, if your using Android, the world's most custom mobile operating system, rooting seems pointless in my opinion. Built-in backup software such as Google Backup is the best option. No need to root, and most of the time it backups automatically. If that doesn't work, you're forced to root to use a third party backup software that can seriously mess up the software. You own a Pixel 2, so I doubt you would want it to stop working completely because of rooting. Rooting is a very risky thing, just like how jail-breaking on iOS is very risky. If you don't know what you're doing, software bricking is almost certain to happen. Use only if you know how to root like an expert: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.keramidas.TitaniumBackup
  10. You have to realize LinusTechTips is located in Surrey, B.C, Canada (Greater Vancouver Area). Please be patient, they sometimes release phone reviews slower because its not as easy for them to review phones as fast like the people in the US. Contacting them won't really help much. If they're planning to review the Asus ROG phone, they will eventually review it. So far, they have a Asus Rog Phone "first impressions" video, seen here: They will review it, you just have to give them more time.
  11. Most manufacturers do that to convince you to buy a new phone. No phone is designed to last forever, but you should expect any flagship phone to last at least 2 years. iOS and Android are vastly different, one is simple and the other is pure customization. Never expect Android to be as seamless as iOS, because they aren't the same operating system. If your this concerned about the fragmentation of Android, you're better off sticking with iOS.
  12. I own a S9, and currently running Android Oreo. All non-google companies take their time on android updates, some companies release slow, and some companies release faster. Samsung is known to have one of the slowest android updates, due to its highly customized skin, TouchWiz, on top of Android. But I don't mind it. There are so many features on the S9, that I don't need to have the latest software. There will always be minor security updates that get released as soon as possible, but Samsung was always this slow, so I got used to it. Like I said, Android has always been like this, and I really predict it won't change any time soon. You just have to either accept that fact, or go with Pixel phones. Basically, go with non-google phones and wait for updates, or go with a google phone and get the latest updates as soon as they're released. You will get used to the slow/fast updates once you choose the right phone for you.
  13. It's because that's how it always was, and it won't change anytime soon. Fragmentation is a common problem in android. The issue is the customization each manufacturer places on top of the default android software, and also carrier bloatware. This won't change anytime soon. If you really want a android phone with the fastest updates, Pixel is the only phone so far. There's a reason why Android is called "stock android" on pixel devices. Google designs both hardware and software, simultaneously, without adding any other extra customization. It's normal to complain, but you have to admit, Android is a mobile operating system designed to be customized. By the way, its impossible to know what software Note 10 will come in. It's only October 2018, and Note 10 is expected to be released in August 2019. Way too early to determine anything about the Note 10.
  14. There's no results on regarding the part where you can use the dongle into the car, but I've never heard people do it either, so I highly doubt it will work that way. Also, I never used a dongle, ever. I own a Galaxy S9 currently. No phone has two USB type C ports, but there are dongles that allow you to charge and listen with wired headphones at the same time, like these https://apple.co/2EoHaAd Personally, I think it will be very hard for you to live without a headphone jack. Don't get a phone without a headphone jack, because remembering both the headphones and dongle can be very annoying. If you lose it, its $10.
  15. Your welcome. Yes, that may be the issue, since car manufactures tend not to implement the best Bluetooth hardware, especially in less-expensive models.
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