Doramius

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About Doramius

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    Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    US, but known not to stay in one place.
  • Interests
    Stuff I find interesting
  • Biography
    Tall, Dark and married with children. Since new stuff only lasts about 2 weeks, I buy used.....a lot.
  • Occupation
    Tech Stuff
  1. Looks like the replacement screen was not only used, but was rebuilt. It is a manufacturer's stamp and it's usually on one of the diffuser layers BEHIND the backlight layer. Someone got the layers mixed up putting it together. I don't always like going to ebay unless I have to. For replacement screens I usually go to laptopscreen.com to get my replacement screens. They actually have great customer service if you happen to receive or order the wrong part, and replace if you get a bad one. Out of several hundred orders in the last 5 years, I may have had 2 come DOA, if at all.
  2. What size is your mainboard?
  3. Should be fine, but if you want to replace it, can't go wrong with Arctic Silver.
  4. RGB it, and diffuse with inexpensive selenite crystals. They're a bit lighter than amethyst, and diffuse the color to whatever you want.
  5. Apple will allow you to absorb the partition through Disk Utility. Just be careful how you do it. Windows will also integrate the unused portion. Most OS's allow you to do this, nowadays.
  6. I had a sense that's where you were thinking, but no harm done. I had to read my statement again after you made your post, and made the clarification in case someone else may have interpreted it that way. It's late on a Thursday. If we were all thinking clearly, we'd probably be at the bar asking for strong drinks to remedy that issue.
  7. I've used Macrium mostly without issue, or have had very few problems when cloning over. I think the biggest issue I ever had was some odd conflict where I didn't pay attention and the original drive was using legacy Boot, and the clone drive was being installed with UEFI initiated.
  8. If using RAID as your only storage option, it is an idiot move waiting for failure. I think you're looking into my statement incorrectly. First, a RAID "CAN' be used as a backup of another data source. As stated, the OP had external drives that have failed, the RAID would be a backup of that data. The 'redundancy of the RAID' IS NOT a backup to itself. It is only a precautionary or preventative to data loss of the array, itself. Because of this, RAIDs are actually becoming quite popular for home storage, especially when run as a NAS. Even Popular Electronics and other major publications has acknowledged the growing popularity of consumer RAID setups due to the increase in home based NAS devices for data storage and home surveillance. I also mentioned cloud services, which are also gaining in popularity for home users. If you make a copy of a file to be archived in a separate place, it is a backup. The level to which one goes for the protection and location of that backup, is another story. It is a backup, nonetheless. Again, not exactly sure how you were understanding my reply.
  9. You have a redundancy setup with the RAID. Your alternative would be doing something like RAID 10, RAID 6, or some other RAID combination. For home use, RAID 5 should be plenty and provide appropriate redundancy for safety. Depending on how much data you have, cloud storage might be fine. I'd still keep a physical copy somewhere.
  10. You could probably charter a private jet and do a LAN party. Start a new trend...The "Mile High Gamer's Club". Use the tagline "Only the Elite get this much action a mile up!"
  11. 3.97GB is a common indicator that you are using a 32-bit OS. You will probably have to re-install your OS as a 64-bit version. If you want to save your profile and many settings, Go to C:\Users, and copy your user profile to another drive. Re-install the OS as 64-bit version. After you login to the new OS, and install your drivers, you can go to C:\Users and overwrite the profile with your old profile that you saved. You WILL have to re-install any additional apps or programs. To verify if you have a 64-bit OS, go to: Control Panel\System and Security\System post the screen shot of the window.
  12. ROFL I'll have to think of a funnier RGB analogy then. @Not_Sean Very understandable. I use online storage on frequent occasion. It is VERY convenient. As with anything, you need to do your homework ahead of the investment. I actually have several various home NAS items used for multiple different instances. My larger one is my Plex, which houses about 40TB. That's an expensive setup, and unless someone was planning a similar function, it would be totally overkill for something like a teen girlfriend's temp storage for daily selfies (at least that seems like what my kid's girlfriend does all day.)
  13. BUT THERE'S NO RGB!!!! NOBODY IS ADDRESSING THE LACK OF RGB!!!! Why in God's name did they show a Linus clip without RGB?
  14. @KuJoe I'm not continuing further on this. You've identified a miscommunication that doesn't relate to the topic, and it is straying. @Not_Sean The online storage is getting more popular and cheaper. It's still not as cheap as one might believe: 1 - You have to regularly pay to continue to access data you own. It's great for a short period of time, but if you don't want to continue to pay, you either have to buy physical storage anyway, or risk losing access to your data. 2 - At some point the regular payments on larger data stores adds up to the cost of the physical device. In the long run, it's far cheaper owning physical storage. 3 - If there's a problem with internet or the site that holds your storage, you're not stuck at the mercy of the site. While unlikely with most larger storage companies, it has happened far too often with people going with some the smaller local data centers where some offer lower cost online storage. Don't misunderstand. There are many benefits to online storage. Smaller sizes are fine, but don't consider them permanent storage solutions. 100GB is very small, and anything important should be backed up on physical storage. The accessibility of these online storage solutions is very convenient.
  15. That mainboard should be able to handle it. It should automatically detect and run that setup, too. If not, check in the BIOS video graphics settings and see what the first detected device is [PCI-E slot or mainboard graphics] There might even be a setting that allows you to choose display on both. The manual might even give specific instructions to make this setup happen.