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Thavion Hawk

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About Thavion Hawk

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  1. Thavion Hawk

    Free game codes up for grabs

    And you are the winner. enjoy.
  2. Thavion Hawk

    Free game codes up for grabs

    All good.
  3. Thavion Hawk

    Free game codes up for grabs

    www.amdrewards.com you will have to create an account but yeah that's the code
  4. Thavion Hawk

    Free game codes up for grabs

    Here's a code for anyone running an AMD GPU. GGL4CQWM6ZZMG4XX That's for The Division 2 Gold Edition and World War Z Have fun. I'm not interested in either of these games and my coworker that got the code already owns them.
  5. Thavion Hawk

    $90 of Fortnight Gift Pack Codes

    rL3khj0azwSOibAYx4WwlEqs xJj3ENyXy6BnyrR1SmuvNRoh Both of those codes are from an Nvidia bundle and as I don't play Fortnight I figured I'd give them away here. $45 each. First come first serve.
  6. Thavion Hawk

    How Not to cool an i9-9900k!

    Yeah the VRM's on the board suck, it has one m.2 slot and it's shit for a Z370... Let's call it (Not Grate?) At least he went for a Z Chipset. God forbid it cam in with a B360 Mobo. I'm not going to defend any of this fail and my use of Good on all things but the CPU cooling was just fast fill in for this post. I wouldn't use it in my build and that's all I'll say on it.
  7. Thavion Hawk

    How Not to cool an i9-9900k!

    I can't lie. I just took in a computer with the following specs. Mobo: MSI Z370-A Pro = Good RAM: 32GBs of Corsair Vengeance 3000Mhz = Over Kill but Good Case: Fractal Meshify C = Good PSU: EVGA 850 G3 = Good and not too Overkill for this build GPU: EVGA GTX1060 as a stand in for his GTX1080ti thought was his problem. = It's likley not his problem and both are Good with the 1080ti being best. CPU: Intel i9-9900k = As Good as it Gets and as Hot as it Gets when you use... CPU Cooler: An Intel Reference CPU cooler off an i5-7400 which is like using a garden house to put out a five alarm fire! So yeah this was so much a fail I had to share it. I can snap some pics if you all want.
  8. My last Case Review was for the Cooler Master Master Box Pro 5 RGB. As I said at the end of that review, I would be doing this case at some point in the future. Well it's some time later and now that I've done a build in the case I'm ready to give my opinion on it. Much of my review will be referencing the last one so I do recommend you read it before reading this one, although it is not strictly necessary. First Impressions: Pulling the case out of the box and looking at it, it's a showy design. Opting for form and function over the clean looks of the Master Box Pro 5 RGB. This is a good thing for the MB500 as it forgoes the closed off flat face of the Pro 5 RGB in favor of a bolder front panel featuring a bottom mounted half height mesh grill. Behind the grill you'll find Two of the case's Three 120 RGB fans installed providing ample(if sub) optimal air flow. The Third RGB fan can be found mounted to the back as an exhaust and give's instant value to the Tinted Tampered Glass Side Panel. For $95 it's hard to find a better RGB Gaming case. Cracking it open: The front of the case is bold. It slants from the top down and bottom up with a solid plastic top and mesh bottom meeting at the middle. The mesh is not super fine so it won't restrict too much airflow and allows plenty of light to shine from the pair of RGB Fans mounted behind it. The front of the case features room for Three 120mm Fans with spot empty. Where the Pro 5 featured all Three of it's RGB Fans up front, the MB500 moves one to the back replacing the 4th non RGB fan of its cousin. Even with one fewer fan this layout gives far better airflow and has the side effect of providing much more value to the Tampered Glass Side Panel with an RGB Fan in direct view. If you want to change the fan's up or install an AIO, there is room four up to Three 120mm or Two 140mm Fans and like wise up to a 360mm or 280mm(Restrictions do to the PSU Shroud may apply) Topping the front panel you will find the same basic IO as the Pro 5 RGB with CM's trade mark 45 degree slant. There is little to note about the layout. From left to right you'll find the Reset Button, Headphone and Microphone jacks, Power Button with Power LED Ring around it, Two USB3 Type A ports (Normal USB3 not the newer 3.1 Gen 2) and a Data Access LED. (Finished Build with RGB fans linked to ASUS Aura) I do like that CoolerMaster once again used the Pro 5 RGB's Half Hinged mounting system for the Tempered Glass side panel. Two rubber gasket screws hold the top in while the bottom lip of the Glass has a metal hinge plate that sockets onto the bottom frame rail of the case allowing the panel to pivot out at the top. The downside I've found is that the hinge plat can make centering up the top screw holes with the Glass a bit finicky, but I find it a better design then full rear hinges or simply using four screws. Once inside the case you find a reasonable layout for the internals. Working front to back, you find the two RGB fans, each with relatively short 3-pin DC power and standard 4-pin RGBV headers. If you have a motherboard with enough fan headers or a fan controller you can discard the Three into One Molex Power Adapter they come connected to. The same goes for the Three into One RGB Cable and included SATA Powerd One Button RGB Controller. Given that most Motherboards these days come with one or more RGBV headers with Software to control them, you're more likely going to go with that method over the bundled Controller. (All Three RGB Fans come Pre connected to the Molex and RGB Cables. The RGB Controller is packed in with the Case Accessories) Moving back from the RGB Fans you have two removable 2.5" SSD/HDD Sleds with cutouts above and below for clean cable running. At the bottom of the Case you'll find a non removable, Full Cover Power Supply Shroud with slats and a Cutout in the Middle and Front to allow for Pump/Res mounting and Radiator installation. It is clear that Liquid Cooling is something this case was built for to some extent. Next up you have the Motherboard tray itself. The mounting options and support are quite good with lettered standoff points to help guide a novice builder. As a plus CM includes a Standoff Driver with the screws so you won't have to improvise(Anyone that has had to use pliers to install standoffs.) if you didn't already have a socket driver handy. Above, in front and below the Motherboard tray there is ample cutouts for cables(More on that later) The back of the case has nothing out of the ordinary. All of the Slot Covers are removable, vented and held in by normal screws(Thumbscrews would be nice but really are not needed) The Rear IO cutout is well done making installation of IO Shields easy(Not all cases stamp it out equally even at higher price points) As for the PSU, the rear of the case has two thumb screews holding in a mounting bracket. This is meant to allow easier mounting of PSU's sliding it in from the back. This is a handy feture given the PSU Shroud also hides a Non removable HDD/SSD Rack limiting the area you have to slide a PSU into place. The PSU can be mounted both Top or Bottom facing with a filtered intake on the bottom, although the limited venting on the PSU shroud could choke off smaller PSU's. Taking off the rear side panel you'll find a solid selection of Cable Management loops to run all the included cables along with those for power and data without much trouble. The included Zip Ties and Twist Ties make this job more or less painless. As ever a modular PSU will help with limiting Cable Runs, but the PSU Shroud does come up big in hiding any disused Cables from site. It is also here that you can get access to the HDD/SSD Drive Bay giving you a total of Four places to mount 2.5" HDD/SSD's with two of those also fitting 3.5" HDD's should you need the larger capacity. The top of the case features a magnetic filter covering an off set mount for two 120mm Fans or a 240mm Radiator. Given the offset and height above the Motherboard, there should be little problem with parts clearance. Pros: -All and all this is a good case with solid cable management options allowing for clean builds. -There is more then enough room for large GPU's for an SLI or Crossfire Build -The PSU Mounting Bracket is simple to use and helps offset the constraints of the PSU Shroud and Drive Cage. -The included fans are bright enough to shine through the tinted Glass Side Panel. -Airflow is good, thought not perfect. Steve from Gamers Nexis has shown cases with this fan layout do well to chill GPU's but the airflow can starve CPU Coolers some what. -Top and Front mount Liquid Cooling support is solid. Cons: -The Front of the case is a bit much. Personal preference for cleaner looks aside it's okay though making this a week con. -There is no real Filters on the intake. The Mesh in the front will help, but it's not removable without taking the full front panel off. - CPU cooling could suffer do to large GPU's blocking off airflow from the low mounted Front Fans. (Gamers Nexis showed many times) - Like with the Pro 5 RGB, the Tint on the Glass Side Panel is too dark for the front RGB fans to shine through. the MB500 does however move one fan to the back giving better RGB out of the box. Conclusion: For under $100 this is a solid choice for a Gamer build with RGB cred. For every negative I've found there's one or more positives. It's easy to build in, has room for all but the largest parts and really it's more than enough for the vast number of those looking for something like it. I'd pick this over the Pro 5 RGB purly on its inproved Airflow even if it's neither perfect nor to my liking (Front panel)
  9. Thavion Hawk

    CoolerMaster MasterBox Pro 5 RGB Review

    Glad to help.
  10. You can look at the specs on CM's Website Here so I won't bother with the low level details, only my personal experiences with this case over the past three builds I've done in it. First Impressions: Pulling the case out of the box and looking at it, it's a very clean design. You have a flat boxy exterior that would look mundane if not for the tinted plastic front panel showing off the white blades of the included three RGB fans. That along with the full cover Smoked Tempered Glass side panel give the case a much more enthusiast look. I say enthusiast because this case isn't really for Gamers, it's a case you buy if you want RGB and Glass on a budget. For under $99 you do get that for sure, but read on for the flaws. The top is solid, no fan mounts or venting making the air flow a one way front to back affair already maxed out with a fourth black non RGB 120mm fan in back for exhaust. Cracking it open: The front of the case is dominated by the solid tinted plastic panel behind which you can see the included RGB fans. Along the edges there are token Slats that represent the only real air intake points for the case. Removing the plat is as simple as pulling it out from the bottom as it pops out with little if any force. Once out you will find plenty of room for mounting three 120mm or two 140mm fans. The included fans are mounted with plastic Expanding Push Pin's instead of screws. I found taking them off to be quite east. Once must simple push the Center Pin out to allow the expanded Hosing to contract and slide out. Getting them back in without breaking them can be a pain but is doable without tools. At the top of the case you will find the Front IO with CM's trade mark 45 degree slant. There is little to note about the layout with Power and Data LEDs, Power and Reset, Headphone, Microphone and two USB3 Type A ports(Normal USB3 not the newer 3.1 Gen 2) No Type C or 3.1 Gen 2 and no Fan Speed or LED controls.(The latter three are not included with the case nor are they advertised as being so, but I feel it bares mensioning) I do like that CoolerMaster uses a half Hinged mounting system for the Tempered Glass side panel. Two rubber gasket screws hold the top in while the bottom lip of the Glass has a metal hinge plate that sockets onto the bottom frame rail of the case allowing the panel to pivot out at the top. The downside I've found is that the hinge plat can make centering up the top screw holes with the Glass a bit finicky, but I find it a better design then full rear hinges or simply using four screws. Once inside the case you find a reasonable layout for the internals. Working front to back, you find the three RGB fans, each with relatively short 3-pin DC power and standard 4-pin RGBV headers linked together by a Molex to Tripple 3-Pin and Three into One RGBV cable respectively. If you have a motherboard with enough fan headers or a fan controller you can discard the Molex adapter. The same goes for the Three into One RGB header. Given that most Motherboards I've worked with have at most Two RGBV headers I tend to leave the Three into One adapter in place. Moving back from the RGB Fans you have three spots to mount 2.5" SSD/HDD Sleds(Only two are included with the Case) These mount flat to the back of the case to show off your SSD', or can be removed to make way for up to a 360mm Radiator and Pump/Res. Yes this case is built with Liquid Cooling support, but you are limited to a single 120mm Rear and the aforementioned front 360mm mounting for radiators. Back to Storage, you have a removable Two Sled 3.5"/2.5" Drive Cage at the bottom of the case. Again it can be removed to make way for Water Cooling or for better air flow from the bottom most case fan. Next up you have the Motherboard tray itself. The mounting options and support are quite good with lettered standoff points to help guide a novice builder. As a plus CM includes a Standoff Driver with the screws so you won't have to improvise(Anyone that has had to use pliers to install standoffs.) if you didn't already have a socket driver handy. Above, in front and below the Motherboard tray there is ample cutouts for cables(More on that later) Finally the removable plastic Power Supply Shroud. If you do not want it you can simple remove it with a single thumb screw, however as it does not block off the entire bottom of the case and does give enough coverage to obscure most if not all of your PSU Cables(Again more on that later) I tend to leave it on. The top of the shroud does have a whole to pass through cables located in line with most motherboards Front Panel headers. That cutout is of little use in my experience, however I could see it used for a second GPU's PCIe or like wise the power to a Sound Card. In those cases the shorter run from the top of the shroud to the card may look better than running the cable through the mane cable cutouts at the back of the Motherboard. I should note that you will need to remove the Shroud to installation of the PSU. The back of the case has nothing out of the ordinary. All of the Slot Covers are removable, vented and held in by normal screws(Thumbscrews would be nice but really are not needed) The bottom most cover is different from the rest offering some cable hooks advertised by CM in the case bumpf, but I've found no real point to it. The Rear IO cutout is well done making installation of IO Shields easy(Not all cases stamp it out equally even at higher price points) As for the PSU, it has mounting holes for both top and bottom fan orientation. If you do mount it with the fan up, you will need to remove the PSU Shroud as it is not vented. The bottom of the case does come with a rear sliding filter for the PSU intake, and the feet of the machine gives it about two inches of clearance for good airflow.(The only naturally good airflow in the case.) Around back you find a normal, two thumb screw case panel. It is flat maintaining the all around clean lines of the build with a simple mat black finish. Taking it off you will find ample cable management space and cable tie-down points. Like with the stand off driver, CM was nice enough to include a number of ~5" black zip ties along with the included Twist tie holding the front panel cables to a together should be enough to reasonably handle cable managing your build. As most Mid-High end PSU's also include zip, twist or even velcro ties, this case is very easy to cable manage. My only complaint would be the lack of cable tie offs between the cutouts for the 2.5" Trays. You may need to improvise to cleanly run cables in the gaps as I did with this build. If you are using an non modular PSU you will find a quartet of tie-downs in a recessed plate next to the PSU that makes for an excellent hide for unused cables. (That plate is the reason you must install the PSU from the front by removing the Shroud) Pros, Cons and Notes: I couldn't help but put some of my build impressions in ahead of this section, but I will go into more detail here including the flaws. Pros: -All and all this is a good looking case and the solid cable management options alow for very clean builds. -There is more then enough room for large GPU's for an SLI or Crossfire Build(See Cons for why not to do so) -The PSU Shroud is a nice to have and easly removed item, as is the HDD/SSD cage, both of which use a single thumb screw to mount and remove. -The included fans are bright enough to shine through the tinted front panel and show through(Not nearly as well) the tinted Glass Side Panel. Cons: -The effectively Solid, extremely restrictive front panel chokes the system's airflow. The included Triple 120mm Fans combined provide about as much airflow as a single low RPM 120mm fan would in a case with a mesh front. Taking the panel off provides unrestricted airflow, but destroys the clean look of the case. -There is No Filters on the Inteak. No Mesh Gills, nothing. The only Filter on this case is the bottom mounted one for the PSU. -No Top mounting for fans or a Radiators limits cooling even more so. -Do to the constricted front panel, large builds with multiple GPU's and any form of Overclocking is Not Okay. You'd cook your parts. -The tint on the Glass Side Panel is too dark for the front RGB fans to shine through. Perfect if you have RGB Cards or Motherboard lighting though. Notes: -The MasterBox Pro 5 line does have a Mesh front panel option. The panel can be purchased from Cooler Master's UK store, however as of posting it's not available from the US store. If you can get one of those, or are willing to do some light case modding(Cutting and installing Mesh on the front panel or the front frame) you'll be stuck taking the front panel off the case if things just get too hot. I've seen one system where the owner bent chicken wire to form his own panel(Sadly no photo of that) Conclusion: For under $100 you can get this case and build a very good looking system with little trouble. Even B Chip-set boards from AMD and Intel come with RGB Headers these days(Often trimmed back color control options) making the RGB lighting on this case usable even with lower, affordable builds. I can honestly recommend this case to people that want the looks and are not going to be testing the limits of thermals. The overall clean look of the case makes for a good contrast with the lighting and it's honestly one of the easiest cases I've built in. If you want the RGB, better Airflow and can live without the clean look, you can get the CoolerMaster MasterBox MB500 for a few bucks less and still get the same Triple 120mm RGB. (I'll be reviewing that case in the near future) It drops the non RGB fan, moving one of the three RGB's to take it's place, and has a mesh grill to give some airflow(Again look for my full review when it drops) Buy it and you'll love it for its looks and ease of build, just know it will run hot unless you put effort into making it run cooler.
  11. Thavion Hawk

    ThreadRipper Workstation 3

    I recommended Sapphire and personally use ASUS cards, but the manager wanted the cheapest RX580 8GB and the Phantom Gaming looks to be that at the moment. This system isn't being built to be silent though, so long as the card works and runs cool enough to keep working, it's all good. Honestly given the price and quality of the other parts this is about the only thing in the system being skimped on.
  12. Thavion Hawk

    ThreadRipper Workstation 3

    So if you've seen my posts before, I've already built two other Thread Ripper Systems. The first, a mATX build was a special order for a scientist doing weather modeling. He needed a small enough system he could take in his luggage on the flight home to South America. That special order of parts resulted in a multiple ordering errors that caused a total of Three Motherboards, Two CPU's, Two AIO's and Three sets of RAM to be ordered. The second Full ATX Thread Ripper build was meant to clear out the spare Mobo, CPU and RAM, but that build still left us with an all but use less X399 Motherboard. After selling the second Full ATX Thread Ripper build in far less time then expected, the store manager agreed to order another CPU, Cooler and RAM to build a Third Thread Ripper system for sale to use the last of the Three motherboards. At the moment of this post I'm still waiting on the GPU and SSD for that build but I want to start this thread ahead of time listing the parts I'll be using(Partly because I have nothing else to do at work atm) Okay all there Preamble is over, Here's the parts list so far. CPU: Thread Ripper 2920X CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-U14S TR4-SP3(For all the posters complaining about our using a 120mm CLC on the past two builds, here's a special order, TR4 Full Cover Tower Cooler. I'd have used this on the other builds, but mATX build had to be small, light and survive International Air Travel while the first Full ATX build was build to use up the redundant parts ordered) Motherboard: ASRock x399 Taichi (Ordered by mistake because the only mATX x399 Motherboard is the ASRock x399m Taichi.) Memory: 4x8GB Corsair Vengeance LPX 2400Mhz (Picked from Motherboard QVL for Max compatibility) GPU: ASRock RX580 8GB (Brand may change, but its going to be an RX580 8GB. Manager wants it to be an all AMD build, I just want to build it) PSU: EVGA 1000 GQ (We've had this thing on sale for $139 for months but no takers. That's below Amazon's Price! Finally talked the boss into using it in this build) SSD: 500GB Samsung 970 EVO (Only Storage as built, but we already have a buyer on the line for this thing and he's looking to ad in a HDD RAID) OS: Windows 10 Pro So that's the build, Our Sale Price for it is $2,193. You can do the math and look at our markup for it if you like. I'll have parts and build photos soon. At this point I'm tired of waiting for the SSD and GPU so I may as well build the thing and put them in last. The GPU's the last thing that goes in anyways.
  13. Thavion Hawk

    i7-9700k Gaming Rig with RTX2070.

    I ran testing with and without the front case panel of the CoolerMaster Master Box 5 RGB. With ASUS's All Core Boost enabled the system hit the high 80's Open and 90's Closed(The Front Panel On and Off only, both Side Panels left on.) I disabled the feature to let the CPU run to Intel's Spec and it dropped about 5C Open and Closed. Under full load the CPU pulled 160W according to HWMonitor and I don't doubt it. All and all the i7-9700k is HOT and the Hyper 212 is enough to cool it, but not enough to overclock. I wouldn't even trust it for a full fat 9900k stock. Thankfully this system will never be overclocked. It will have a mesh mod done on the front panel to help with the case's naturally choked airflow.
  14. Thavion Hawk

    i7-9700k Gaming Rig with RTX2070.

    So here's the thing. I had no involvement in the parts selection of the i7-5960X build. The Store Manager at the time ordered what she thought was the best parts and had no idea what a good cooler was. Top of the line CPU, GPU and big PSU to power them in an expensive big case, but failing on the cooler selection. This is the cooler in question Now playing WoW and not Overclocking at all, that cooler wasn't total shit to the point of failure, but it was total shit and for that reason it was later replaced.
  15. Thavion Hawk

    i7-9700k Gaming Rig with RTX2070.

    So I'm going to start this out by going over the customer for which this system was built and the systems he has now. His oldest system that this is "Replacing" is his old Phenom II x6 1100t rig. Here is a picture of it in its current form. Originally ordered and built before I started working here(I'm friends with this guy from before he even got this system so I know the story behind it) This system was original specked with a pair of GTX285's justifying the then massive for its time 1000W PSU(The one in the picture is the 3rd PSU installed after the first two failed) After many moons he finally decide to upgrade to a new rig and at the same time upgraded this to give to his son. That upgrade included a single GTX980, 1TB Samsung 850 Pro SSD, 2 x 3TB Seagate HDD's in RAID 1, SoundBlaster FX Soundcard and a BD-RW Drive. I don't have any pictures of the system he replaced this one with, but it was and is to this date the most expensive PC I've built(Despite it nolonger being even close to the most powerful) So I remember everything I put inside of it. That system has the following i7-5960X Asus X99-A 32GB DDR4 (4x8GB 2133Mhz) ASUS GTX980Ti Samsung 850Pro 1TB Corsair AX1200i Corsair Carbide 750D (Originally a Intel Reference, then Upgraded to a Corsair H100i) CPU Cooler When it was built and sold it cost him close over $4,000(That price includes some other stuff but I don't recall the parts cost alone) Now for the new build that's actually replacing his Old PC and not his i7-5960X PC. Parts: i7-9700k Asus Prime Z390-A 32GB DDR4 (2x16GB 2400Mhz Crucial) CoolerMaster Hyper 212 Evo 1TB Samsung 970 EVO NVME SSD EVGA 850G3 PSU CoolerMaster MasterBox Pro 5 RGB (I will be Mesh Modding the Front Panel of the case to fix the Airflow) CPU and SSD in the Mobo: Parts under Cooling + Memory: PSU and Mobo in the system, all the Cables Run and Managed but no GPU: Yes I know the rear case fan cable stands out, but the white shroud makes it hard to hide. I could have run it to the second CPU header, but what ever. Here's the Finished build from behind: Here's the fail on my part. I had to go on multiple on site services, handed the system off to my coworker to finish and have no pictures from the front or of the final interior. Just know it looked like the All but the GPU Pick but with a GPU. This last picture shows the GPU Power run up then down the back before going to the GPU itself. All of this comes down to a guy that plays WoW. Just Wow. Nothing Else At All! Just WoW. Now having a Phenome II x6 system with a GTX980, a i7-5960X system with a GTX980ti and an i7-9700k system with an RTX2070, all at his desk to play WoW! I wish I had a picture of his setup, and no he doesn't use them all to play the game at the same time, but if one messes up for any reason he just turns on the other like a fail-safe instead of troubleshooting what ever problem occurred. This is the kind of thing a trust fund baby like him with Millions in the bank can do that us wage slave plebs can't. Wish I had more pictures to share, but that's it. I'll be posting another Thread Ripper Build later this week. Just waiting on a GPU and SSD for it so stay tuned.
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