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How to start playing with VM's

I am system engineer with cctv cameras, I would like to start playing with vms with win server, linux, start learning new stuff, which vmware should I choose?

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VMware Workstation, it's free and a good place to start with since VMware is one of the most popular platforms out there. As you get more advanced, there's a free license for ESXi which is the enterprise version for VMware that you can install on your own hardware to play with.

 

If you want to go a more open source route, then KVM Linux is a good place to look but it requires a Linux-based server to install so it's a little more advanced than VMware Workstation.

 

Whichever route you take, make sure you have VT enabled in your BIOS.

-KuJoe

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15 minutes ago, KuJoe said:

VMware Workstation, it's free

VMware player is free, workstation must be bought.

Don't ask to ask, just ask... please 🤨

sudo chmod -R 000 /*

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Sauron'stm Product Scores:

Spoiler

Just a list of my personal scores for some products, in no particular order, with brief comments. I just got the idea to do them so they aren't many for now :)

Don't take these as complete reviews or final truths - they are just my personal impressions on products I may or may not have used, summed up in a couple of sentences and a rough score. All scores take into account the unit's price and time of release, heavily so, therefore don't expect absolute performance to be reflected here.

 

-Lenovo Thinkpad X220 - [8/10]

Spoiler

A durable and reliable machine that is relatively lightweight, has all the hardware it needs to never feel sluggish and has a great IPS matte screen. Downsides are mostly due to its age, most notably the screen resolution of 1366x768 and usb 2.0 ports.

 

-Apple Macbook (2015) - [Garbage -/10]

Spoiler

From my perspective, this product has no redeeming factors given its price and the competition. It is underpowered, overpriced, impractical due to its single port and is made redundant even by Apple's own iPad pro line.

 

-OnePlus X - [7/10]

Spoiler

A good phone for the price. It does everything I (and most people) need without being sluggish and has no particularly bad flaws. The lack of recent software updates and relatively barebones feature kit (most notably the lack of 5GHz wifi, biometric sensors and backlight for the capacitive buttons) prevent it from being exceptional.

 

-Microsoft Surface Book 2 - [Garbage - -/10]

Spoiler

Overpriced and rushed, offers nothing notable compared to the competition, doesn't come with an adequate charger despite the premium price. Worse than the Macbook for not even offering the small plus sides of having macOS. Buy a Razer Blade if you want high performance in a (relatively) light package.

 

-Intel Core i7 2600/k - [9/10]

Spoiler

Quite possibly Intel's best product launch ever. It had all the bleeding edge features of the time, it came with a very significant performance improvement over its predecessor and it had a soldered heatspreader, allowing for efficient cooling and great overclocking. Even the "locked" version could be overclocked through the multiplier within (quite reasonable) limits.

 

-Apple iPad Pro - [5/10]

Spoiler

A pretty good product, sunk by its price (plus the extra cost of the physical keyboard and the pencil). Buy it if you don't mind the Apple tax and are looking for a very light office machine with an excellent digitizer. Particularly good for rich students. Bad for cheap tinkerers like myself.

 

 

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Just now, Sauron said:

VMware player is free, workstation must be bought.

They got rid of VMware Player a while ago, if you're still using it just upgrade to Workstation (no license required).

-KuJoe

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If its just for testing out stuff i would use Virtualbox. 

If its more permanent then VMware or HyperV

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22 minutes ago, KuJoe said:

They got rid of VMware Player a while ago, if you're still using it just upgrade to Workstation (no license required).

Not quite. They just changed the name. You have two products now:

 

1. VMware Workstation Player

2. VMware Workstation Pro

 

The former is free, the latter is not.

 

Pro adds some very needed features when you want to get more in-depth, such as the network editor to create custom networks for your VMs and connectivity for remote VMware services such as ESXi server management and vCloud resources.

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I installed virtual box, I had a lof of issues with enabling vt-d on h370 asus mobo, to run 64 bits

1 hour ago, KuJoe said:

Close enough. ;)

 

1 hour ago, NelizMastr said:

Not quite. They just changed the name. You have two products now:

 

1. VMware Workstation Player

2. VMware Workstation Pro

 

The former is free, the latter is not.

 

Pro adds some very needed features when you want to get more in-depth, such as the network editor to create custom networks for your VMs and connectivity for remote VMware services such as ESXi server management and vCloud resources.

 

1 hour ago, Dujith said:

If its just for testing out stuff i would use Virtualbox. 

If its more permanent then VMware or HyperV

 

1 hour ago, Sauron said:

VMware player is free, workstation must be bought.

 

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4 minutes ago, wojtepanik said:

I installed virtual box, I had a lof of issues with enabling vt-d on h370 asus mobo, to run 64 bit

You'll need VT-x  not VT-d for 64-bit. VT-d is only needed for SR-IOV and passthrough.

PC Specs - AMD Ryzen 5 5600X MSI B550M Mortar 16GB Crucial Ballistix DDR4-3600 @ CL15 - RX5700XT 660p 1TBGB & 256GB 600p Fractal Define Mini C CM V550 - Pop!_OS 20.04

 

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6 minutes ago, NelizMastr said:

You'll need VT-x  not VT-d for 64-bit. VT-d is only needed for SR-IOV and passthrough.

it started working after enabling speed step, very strange, vt-x is on by default

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VirtualBox is nice, but VMware Workstation has less overhead, faster network connectivity, and runs a lot smoother in my experience. VirtualBox does offer faster OS installs (by less than a minute), faster host to VM connectivity, and has a slightly better Cinebench score on the same hardware.

-KuJoe

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VMWare Workstation Player is great is you like constant crashes, and have no restore point making you force re-install your Linux based OS machine if you screw up, because Linux based OS don't have, like Windows, any recovery systems built-in.

 

Use:

 - Hyper-V (if you are on Windows 10 Pro, fully updated) Hyper-V also has the option to download, setup, and configure Ubuntu for it from a single mouse click, under the "Hyper-V Quick Create" panel which should show up if you look for "Hyper-V" in the start menu, and if you have Hyper-V enabled in Windows 10 (disabled by default). It has restore points, and is free (if you have Pro edition of Windows 10)
 

Capture.PNG.3bb15de077b5fd501c431bc476b60bc9.PNG

 

If you don't have Hyper-V or have another OS beside Ubuntu that you want to try, then I recommend:
- VirtualBox. It is free, and designed for Linux based OS distros. You'll have the best support with that OS. It has, restore points.

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28 minutes ago, GoodBytes said:

VMWare Workstation Player is great is you like constant crashes, and have no restore point making you force re-install your Linux based OS machine if you screw up, because Linux based OS don't have, like Windows, any recovery systems built-in.

 

Use:

 - Hyper-V (if you are on Windows 10 Pro, fully updated) Hyper-V also has the option to download, setup, and configure Ubuntu for it from a single mouse click, under the "Hyper-V Quick Create" panel which should show up if you look for "Hyper-V" in the start menu, and if you have Hyper-V enabled in Windows 10 (disabled by default). It has restore points, and is free (if you have Pro edition of Windows 10)
 

Capture.PNG.3bb15de077b5fd501c431bc476b60bc9.PNG

 

If you don't have Hyper-V or have another OS beside Ubuntu that you want to try, then I recommend:
- VirtualBox. It is free, and designed for Linux based OS distros. You'll have the best support with that OS. It has, restore points.

I want to learn powershell and uedmy win server administration, so I will try hyper-v

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At work I have 8400 i5 but at home I have only i7 920 but as I see now it should be good to go with win 10 pro on 920 i7

 

image.png.c15ddd9e24e1dad1ba25e641e7ccd5ef.png

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Just now, Speed Weed said:

Oracle VirtualBox is a good free alternative to the paid VMWare. 

Yeah, I will use VB for linux VM's and hyper v for microsoft vm's 

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1 hour ago, GoodBytes said:

VMWare Workstation Player is great is you like constant crashes

Can you provide some more details about this? I've never seen any VMware Workstation crash before so I'm wondering what kind of crashes you're seeing. I've been looking for a reason to switch to HyperV but so far I've not found any good reason except for Bitlocker to encrypt all of the VMs (no good free solutions for VMware).

-KuJoe

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24 minutes ago, KuJoe said:

Can you provide some more details about this? I've never seen any VMware Workstation crash before so I'm wondering what kind of crashes you're seeing. I've been looking for a reason to switch to HyperV but so far I've not found any good reason except for Bitlocker to encrypt all of the VMs (no good free solutions for VMware).

It's not VMWare that crashes, (beside the numerous temporary system freezes that the VMWare does with a massive disk write it needs to do, for some reason (yes system with an SSD). it is the OS that kernels panics a lot (Linux version of Windows BSOD), or stuff like Gnome crashing after scaling the window of the VM 1 too many times.

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4 minutes ago, GoodBytes said:

It's not VMWare that crashes, (beside the numerous temporary system freezes that the VMWare does with a massive disk write it needs to do, for some reason (yes system with an SSD). it is the OS that kernels panics a lot (Linux version of Windows BSOD), or stuff like Gnome crashing after scaling the window of the VM 1 too many times.

Could it possibly be OS specific? I've been running Fedora, CentOS, CrunchBang (and ++), Ubuntu, and Linux Mint for years with only a few issues getting the right soundcard to work (not a problem when I have only 1 soundcard available though). I've never seen an OS crash before, that would drive me away from VMware really quick if that ever happened.

-KuJoe

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41 minutes ago, KuJoe said:

Could it possibly be OS specific? I've been running Fedora, CentOS, CrunchBang (and ++), Ubuntu, and Linux Mint for years with only a few issues getting the right soundcard to work (not a problem when I have only 1 soundcard available though). I've never seen an OS crash before, that would drive me away from VMware really quick if that ever happened.

Running CentOS7.. And look... another Gnome crash:

Capture.PNG.e42dfd7116ed57e46b0d56857711a8a1.PNG

 

What garbage.

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1 hour ago, GoodBytes said:

Running CentOS7.. And look... another Gnome crash:

Capture.PNG.e42dfd7116ed57e46b0d56857711a8a1.PNG

 

What garbage.

Any chance you can zip up that VM and upload it somewhere for me to get a copy? I've been trying to force my VMs to crash all morning since my shift ended and so far no luck.

-KuJoe

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2 hours ago, GoodBytes said:

It's not VMWare that crashes, (beside the numerous temporary system freezes that the VMWare does with a massive disk write it needs to do, for some reason (yes system with an SSD). it is the OS that kernels panics a lot (Linux version of Windows BSOD), or stuff like Gnome crashing after scaling the window of the VM 1 too many times.

I'm having this problem with an older version of VirtualBox running CentOS, where GNOME randomly freezes and we can't figure out why. The furthest we ever got to resolving this problem is that the graphics drivers on the host aren't compatible and basically... the devs (VB or CentOS, I can't remember which) said this was expected behavior because they stopped supporting an older Linux kernel the version we're using is based off of.

 

Fun times.

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