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Blue screen of death, tried everything. Cant find help

Premoz1
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So in the morning I encountered the blue screen. The code was bad system config. After restarting the pc 3 times, it tried to automatically repair the problem, (it never works btw) and after I watched YT video, went to advanced options, typing some commands, (in the end I had to type A=all) and the exit. Didnt work. I tried to delete the windows 10 and download again,it says '' there was a problem resetting your pc. No changes were made. '' After that, system restore. This one is weird one for me, and could be actually the only one option, but there is one weird thing. After I select the time (11/11/2018 17:51:21) hit next. I am going to show pic of the screen I get after hitting next. 

So I have to enable the system protection. And how can I do that, because I cant get to settings? 

IMG_20181112_184408.jpg

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https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_10-performance/how-to-enable-system-protection-from-command/9ea84f5e-ee4c-40e9-abdb-a9affd4b1976

This person has the exact same problem as you and there's probably some helpful answers there.

One person said this:

So resurrecting this thread because I recently had this issue and managed to find a solution through the cmd lines.

 

You'll want to go through the advanced repairs to the troubleshoot section where you select the command prompt button. (Press ctrl + f8 during startup)

 

1. In command prompt, you'll want to find out which drive is your c:, as it might be under a different letter. It should appear on the first screen of the startup repair failing, but if it doesn't you can guess by typing <c>: where c is a random letter, then press enter. You'll then want to type dir , until you see the drive that has PerfLog and other system folders. In this example I will use c :

 

2. After you find the correct drive, you'll want to type

cd\Users\YourName

Where YourName is whatever your user account is named. I'm not 100% sure this is necessary, but it did work for me.

 

3. After this, your command line should say

C:\Users\YourName>

You will then want to type

copy c :\windows\system32\config\RegBack\* c :\windows\system32\config

where c : is whatever drive you found in step 1. You will then press enter. If you are asked to overwrite existing files type A for all. This should restore the windows registry. 

 

4. You can then go on to do a system restore, though I did get an error where it prompted me to do a second system restore after I logged back in. It does work, though I am unsure of any negatives that might occur because of this. This can also be accomplished with scanreg commands, though I'm not familiar with them.

 

Bear in mind that I had to put a space between the c and the : to stop it from turning into an emoji. 

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1 hour ago, Premoz1 said:

So in the morning I encountered the blue screen. The code was bad system config. After restarting the pc 3 times, it tried to automatically repair the problem, (it never works btw) and after I watched YT video, went to advanced options, typing some commands, (in the end I had to type A=all) and the exit. Didnt work. I tried to delete the windows 10 and download again,it says '' there was a problem resetting your pc. No changes were made. '' After that, system restore. This one is weird one for me, and could be actually the only one option, but there is one weird thing. After I select the time (11/11/2018 17:51:21) hit next. I am going to show pic of the screen I get after hitting next. 

So I have to enable the system protection. And how can I do that, because I cant get to settings? 

 

It sounds like a corrupt installation of windows. If trying to Reset your PC in both options of Delete Everything, and Keep My Files doesn't work, then the next best option is to completely reinstall windows from scratch. Whether that is through a fresh installation media, or if you can get installation media from the manufacturer. This is an unfortunately good example of why backups of data are highly recommended. If possible, I would use another computer to recover the data and to create installation media, then reinstall the OS. To move the data, I personally would recommend using a network transfer application for faster speeds (something like D-lan) once your OS has been reinstaleld

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1 hour ago, Haztec said:

https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_10-performance/how-to-enable-system-protection-from-command/9ea84f5e-ee4c-40e9-abdb-a9affd4b1976

This person has the exact same problem as you and there's probably some helpful answers there.

One person said this:

So resurrecting this thread because I recently had this issue and managed to find a solution through the cmd lines.

 

You'll want to go through the advanced repairs to the troubleshoot section where you select the command prompt button. (Press ctrl + f8 during startup)

 

1. In command prompt, you'll want to find out which drive is your c:, as it might be under a different letter. It should appear on the first screen of the startup repair failing, but if it doesn't you can guess by typing <c>: where c is a random letter, then press enter. You'll then want to type dir , until you see the drive that has PerfLog and other system folders. In this example I will use c :

 

2. After you find the correct drive, you'll want to type

cd\Users\YourName

Where YourName is whatever your user account is named. I'm not 100% sure this is necessary, but it did work for me.

 

3. After this, your command line should say

C:\Users\YourName>

You will then want to type

copy c :\windows\system32\config\RegBack\* c :\windows\system32\config

where c : is whatever drive you found in step 1. You will then press enter. If you are asked to overwrite existing files type A for all. This should restore the windows registry. 

 

4. You can then go on to do a system restore, though I did get an error where it prompted me to do a second system restore after I logged back in. It does work, though I am unsure of any negatives that might occur because of this. This can also be accomplished with scanreg commands, though I'm not familiar with them.

 

Bear in mind that I had to put a space between the c and the : to stop it from turning into an emoji. 

I tried that, but instead of typing stuff like cd\users\yourname I typed cd\windows\system32\config

Is that ok? And this pc is my dads, I dont know its '' yourname''

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45 minutes ago, Premoz1 said:

I tried that, but instead of typing stuff like cd\users\yourname I typed cd\windows\system32\config

Is that ok? And this pc is my dads, I dont know its '' yourname''

Bear in mind that I copied and pasted that reply to the post that I sent a link to. Looking at it now I don't think it's that necessary as those are system folders and not user folders, but it worked for them so you should probably do it anyway. CD just tells the computer what directory to look for the files in. In this case its in your user folder where "yourname" is just whatever your user account is called.

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16 minutes ago, Haztec said:

Bear in mind that I copied and pasted that reply to the post that I sent a link to. Looking at it now I don't think it's that necessary as those are system folders and not user folders, but it worked for them so you should probably do it anyway. CD just tells the computer what directory to look for the files in. In this case its in your user folder where "yourname" is just whatever your user account is called.

Ok ill try that tomorrow. I info what happens. Wish me good luck

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On 11/12/2018 at 10:15 PM, Haztec said:

https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_10-performance/how-to-enable-system-protection-from-command/9ea84f5e-ee4c-40e9-abdb-a9affd4b1976

This person has the exact same problem as you and there's probably some helpful answers there.

One person said this:

So resurrecting this thread because I recently had this issue and managed to find a solution through the cmd lines.

 

You'll want to go through the advanced repairs to the troubleshoot section where you select the command prompt button. (Press ctrl + f8 during startup)

 

1. In command prompt, you'll want to find out which drive is your c:, as it might be under a different letter. It should appear on the first screen of the startup repair failing, but if it doesn't you can guess by typing <c>: where c is a random letter, then press enter. You'll then want to type dir , until you see the drive that has PerfLog and other system folders. In this example I will use c :

 

2. After you find the correct drive, you'll want to type

cd\Users\YourName

Where YourName is whatever your user account is named. I'm not 100% sure this is necessary, but it did work for me.

 

3. After this, your command line should say

C:\Users\YourName>

You will then want to type

copy c :\windows\system32\config\RegBack\* c :\windows\system32\config

where c : is whatever drive you found in step 1. You will then press enter. If you are asked to overwrite existing files type A for all. This should restore the windows registry. 

 

4. You can then go on to do a system restore, though I did get an error where it prompted me to do a second system restore after I logged back in. It does work, though I am unsure of any negatives that might occur because of this. This can also be accomplished with scanreg commands, though I'm not familiar with them.

 

Bear in mind that I had to put a space between the c and the : to stop it from turning into an emoji. 

My system protection is turned off, I cant system restore

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