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How many HZ can a HDMI cable transmit?

Nic Marlon
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Go to solution Solved by Glenwing,

HDMI cables are rated by bandwidth. The official certification categories are as follows:

  • Standard Speed HDMI Cable — Rated for speeds of at least 2.2275 Gbit/s. This means it will support formats at least up to 720p 60 Hz or 1080p 30 Hz.
  • High Speed HDMI Cable — Rated for speeds of at least 10.2 Gbit/s. This means it will support formats at least up to 1080p 144 Hz, 1440p 85 Hz, or 4K 30 Hz. Pretty much any HDMI meets this standard at least.
  • Premium High Speed HDMI Cable — Rated for speeds of at least 18.0 Gbit/s. This means it will support formats at least up to 1080p 240 Hz, 1440p 144 Hz, or 4K 60 Hz. Most shorter HDMI cables (5 meters in length) will meet this specification (even if they are not formally certified). Longer cables are less likely to meet this specification, so if you want a 10+ meter cable, make sure you get one that actually has a Premium High Speed certification.
  • Ultra High Speed HDMI Cable — This certification level will certify cable for speeds of at least 48.0 Gbit/s, which is enough for 4K 180 Hz or 8K 50 Hz. The certification procedures for this level are not finished yet, so these certifications are not being issued at this time. Any cables currently claiming to be an Ultra High Speed HDMI cable are fake.

If you want to run 1080p 144 Hz, you only need a High Speed HDMI cable, which is basically any HDMI cable.

 

But the cable is not really the important part. The maximum refresh rate available to you will depend mainly on the HDMI speeds supported by the monitor, which could be anything.

 

And don't be fooled by version numbers in this area; many people will tell you "as long as the monitor has HDMI 1.4, it should support 1080p 144 Hz", because the maximum bandwidth of HDMI 1.4 is 10.2 Gbit/s, which is enough for 1080p 144 Hz. However, that is only the maximum allowed by the standard. It does not mean every HDMI 1.4 monitor supports that bandwidth. Individual products may have limits below that.

 

Many newer 1080p 144 Hz monitors with HDMI 1.4 only support 9.0 Gbit/s, only enough for 120 Hz over HDMI. Even older models like the VG248QE (which still have "HDMI 1.4") are limited to less, only enough for 60 Hz over HDMI.

 

If you want to run 144 Hz over HDMI you need a monitor that specifically supports it (like the ViewSonic XG2401). Not all monitors do. And the "HDMI version" of the monitor does not tell you whether it does or not.

I wanted to ask if a HDMI cable could get a monitor to work at 144hz

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What resolution?

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It depends on the build quality of the cable. Poorer quality cables won't reliably transmit higher speeds.

 

Whether or not you get 144Hz to the monitor (assuming the monitor is 144Hz) depends on if the source is compatible with a version of HDMI that supports that bandwidth. You can get a certified HDMI 2.0 cable but if you connect it to a source that's only HDMI 1.4, you're never going to get HDMI 2.0 features no matter how hard you want it to.

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None of the HDMI cables support 4k60, if I'm correct. This is equivalent to 1080p240 in data transfer speeds.

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1 hour ago, hiitswilliam said:

None of the HDMI cables support 4k60, if I'm correct. This is equivalent to 1080p240 in data transfer speeds.

no...most hdmi cables can do 4k60hz...it all depends on the hdmi port...1.2 and 1.4 can only do 4k30hz ...2.0+ can do 4k60hz

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HDMI cables are rated by bandwidth. The official certification categories are as follows:

  • Standard Speed HDMI Cable — Rated for speeds of at least 2.2275 Gbit/s. This means it will support formats at least up to 720p 60 Hz or 1080p 30 Hz.
  • High Speed HDMI Cable — Rated for speeds of at least 10.2 Gbit/s. This means it will support formats at least up to 1080p 144 Hz, 1440p 85 Hz, or 4K 30 Hz. Pretty much any HDMI meets this standard at least.
  • Premium High Speed HDMI Cable — Rated for speeds of at least 18.0 Gbit/s. This means it will support formats at least up to 1080p 240 Hz, 1440p 144 Hz, or 4K 60 Hz. Most shorter HDMI cables (5 meters in length) will meet this specification (even if they are not formally certified). Longer cables are less likely to meet this specification, so if you want a 10+ meter cable, make sure you get one that actually has a Premium High Speed certification.
  • Ultra High Speed HDMI Cable — This certification level will certify cable for speeds of at least 48.0 Gbit/s, which is enough for 4K 180 Hz or 8K 50 Hz. The certification procedures for this level are not finished yet, so these certifications are not being issued at this time. Any cables currently claiming to be an Ultra High Speed HDMI cable are fake.

If you want to run 1080p 144 Hz, you only need a High Speed HDMI cable, which is basically any HDMI cable.

 

But the cable is not really the important part. The maximum refresh rate available to you will depend mainly on the HDMI speeds supported by the monitor, which could be anything.

 

And don't be fooled by version numbers in this area; many people will tell you "as long as the monitor has HDMI 1.4, it should support 1080p 144 Hz", because the maximum bandwidth of HDMI 1.4 is 10.2 Gbit/s, which is enough for 1080p 144 Hz. However, that is only the maximum allowed by the standard. It does not mean every HDMI 1.4 monitor supports that bandwidth. Individual products may have limits below that.

 

Many newer 1080p 144 Hz monitors with HDMI 1.4 only support 9.0 Gbit/s, only enough for 120 Hz over HDMI. Even older models like the VG248QE (which still have "HDMI 1.4") are limited to less, only enough for 60 Hz over HDMI.

 

If you want to run 144 Hz over HDMI you need a monitor that specifically supports it (like the ViewSonic XG2401). Not all monitors do. And the "HDMI version" of the monitor does not tell you whether it does or not.

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9 minutes ago, Glenwing said:

Please note that the "HDMI version" of the monitor does not indicate the capabilities of that monitor. The HDMI 1.4 standard allows up to 1080p 144 Hz, but that does not mean "as long as the monitor has HDMI 1.4 it will work". Full bandwidth support is not required, so many HDMI 1.4 monitors are limited to 1080p 60 Hz over HDMI. If you want to run 144 Hz over HDMI you need a monitor that specifically supports it (like the ViewSonic XG2401). The HDMI version of the monitor will not tell you whether it supports 144 Hz over HDMI or not.

Just so we're clear because this is interesting for me - you are saying that a monitor X can support 144Hz in 2560x1440 and can have high enough HDMI port for it but despite that it can still be limited when using HDMI cable (because the manufacturer preferred DisplayPort)?

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11 minutes ago, Glenwing said:

HDMI cables are rated by bandwidth. The official certification categories are as follows:

  • Standard Speed HDMI Cable — Rated for speeds of at least 2.2275 Gbit/s. This means it will support formats at least up to 720p 60 Hz or 1080p 30 Hz.
  • High Speed HDMI Cable — Rated for speeds of at least 10.2 Gbit/s. This means it will support formats at least up to 1080p 144 Hz, 1440p 85 Hz, or 4K 30 Hz. Pretty much any HDMI meets this standard at least.
  • Premium High Speed HDMI Cable — Rated for speeds of at least 18.0 Gbit/s. This means it will support formats at least up to 1080p 240 Hz, 1440p 144 Hz, or 4K 60 Hz. Most shorter HDMI cables (5 meters in length) will meet this specification (even if they are not formally certified). Longer cables are less likely to meet this specification, so if you want a 10+ meter cable, make sure you get one that actually has a Premium High Speed certification.
  • Ultra High Speed HDMI Cable — This certification level will certify cable for speeds of at least 48.0 Gbit/s, which is enough for 4K 180 Hz or 8K 50 Hz. The certification procedures for this level are not finished yet, so these certifications are not being issued at this time. Any cables currently claiming to be an Ultra High Speed HDMI cable are fake.

If you want to run 1080p 144 Hz, you only need a High Speed HDMI cable, which is basically any HDMI cable. The cable is not really the determining factor here. If you want to run 1080p 144 Hz over HDMI, you will need a monitor that supports this, which is rare.

 

Please note that the "HDMI version" of the monitor does not indicate the capabilities of that monitor. The HDMI 1.4 standard allows up to 1080p 144 Hz, but that does not mean "as long as the monitor has HDMI 1.4 it will work". Full bandwidth support is not required, so many HDMI 1.4 monitors are limited to 1080p 60 Hz over HDMI. If you want to run 144 Hz over HDMI you need a monitor that specifically supports it (like the ViewSonic XG2401). The HDMI version of the monitor will not tell you whether it supports 144 Hz over HDMI or not.

the problem with that list thou...if you look at pretty much any regular high speed hdmi, they all are capable of 4k60hz......hell standard hdmi do they even sell them anymore? and yea ultra is a scam lol

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Just now, Lathlaer said:

Just so we're clear because this is interesting for me - you are saying that a monitor X can support 144Hz in 2560x1440 and can have high enough HDMI port for it but despite that it can still be limited when using HDMI cable (because the manufacturer preferred DisplayPort)?

Manufacturers do not have to support the maximum allowed bandwidth. So yes, it may support 2560×1440 @ 144 Hz over DisplayPort, but be limited to less over HDMI. Even though the HDMI 2.0 standard allows up to 18 Gbit/s which is enough. Devices may have lower limitations, at the discretion of the manufacturer.

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1 hour ago, circeseye said:

the problem with that list thou...if you look at pretty much any regular high speed hdmi, they all are capable of 4k60hz......hell standard hdmi do they even sell them anymore? and yea ultra is a scam lol

Shorter cables, yes. This is because signals degrade more over longer distances, and less over shorter distances. So if you want to manufacture a cable that can handle a certain speed, it will be a function of distance. That means if you want to make a series of cables that can handle HDMI 1.4 speeds, you need to manufacture it with high enough quality that it can transmit these signals at the longest distance you want to make. So the result is a cable that can handle 10.2 Gbit/s at maybe 15 meters, but higher speeds (18+ Gbit/s easily) if you cut a 3 meter cable from the same stock. So, many High Speed HDMI cables, at shorter cuts, can easily handle 18 Gbit/s. But if you look at longer 15+ m cables, you will find more people having issues.

 

Yes, most High Speed certified HDMI cables will handle 4K 60 Hz, but it is not guaranteed, as they were not tested at that speed. That is why the Premium High Speed certification was created, it was a response to complaints about HDMI cables (which had valid High Speed certifications) which failed to work at the hugher HDMI 2.0 speeds.

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20 hours ago, Glenwing said:

HDMI cables are rated by bandwidth. The official certification categories are as follows:

  • Standard Speed HDMI Cable — Rated for speeds of at least 2.2275 Gbit/s. This means it will support formats at least up to 720p 60 Hz or 1080p 30 Hz.
  • High Speed HDMI Cable — Rated for speeds of at least 10.2 Gbit/s. This means it will support formats at least up to 1080p 144 Hz, 1440p 85 Hz, or 4K 30 Hz. Pretty much any HDMI meets this standard at least.
  • Premium High Speed HDMI Cable — Rated for speeds of at least 18.0 Gbit/s. This means it will support formats at least up to 1080p 240 Hz, 1440p 144 Hz, or 4K 60 Hz. Most shorter HDMI cables (5 meters in length) will meet this specification (even if they are not formally certified). Longer cables are less likely to meet this specification, so if you want a 10+ meter cable, make sure you get one that actually has a Premium High Speed certification.
  • Ultra High Speed HDMI Cable — This certification level will certify cable for speeds of at least 48.0 Gbit/s, which is enough for 4K 180 Hz or 8K 50 Hz. The certification procedures for this level are not finished yet, so these certifications are not being issued at this time. Any cables currently claiming to be an Ultra High Speed HDMI cable are fake.

If you want to run 1080p 144 Hz, you only need a High Speed HDMI cable, which is basically any HDMI cable.

 

But the cable is not really the important part. The maximum refresh rate available to you will depend mainly on the HDMI speeds supported by the monitor, which could be anything.

 

And don't be fooled by version numbers in this area; many people will tell you "as long as the monitor has HDMI 1.4, it should support 1080p 144 Hz", because the maximum bandwidth of HDMI 1.4 is 10.2 Gbit/s, which is enough for 1080p 144 Hz. However, that is only the maximum allowed by the standard. It does not mean every HDMI 1.4 monitor supports that bandwidth. Individual products may have limits below that.

 

Many newer 1080p 144 Hz monitors with HDMI 1.4 only support 9.0 Gbit/s, only enough for 120 Hz over HDMI. Even older models like the VG248QE (which still have "HDMI 1.4") are limited to less, only enough for 60 Hz over HDMI.

 

If you want to run 144 Hz over HDMI you need a monitor that specifically supports it (like the ViewSonic XG2401). Not all monitors do. And the "HDMI version" of the monitor does not tell you whether it does or not.

So if I buy the ViewSonic XG2401 and a 2.0 hdmi cable, I can play at 144hz?

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11 hours ago, Glenwing said:

Yes. You don't need any new cable though, whatever HDMI cable you have laying around will most likely work fine.

Ok, this was very helpful, thanks

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