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How long ssd will last.SMART confusion?

adityasharma7755
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I want to know how long will my SSD last. As SMART tells that worst value is already achieved. I have also activated over provisioning.

Also, suggest me how can I improve the health of SSD.

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For the "Current" and "Worst" columns, the values are normalized to 100. That means 100 is "everything's fine". The "worst" value is the lowest "Current" value the drive recorded, not where it shouldn't be ever.

 

"Threshold" is the value at which point SMART diagnostic tools will flag an issue. Most attributes with a threshold of 0 means it's not critical, while for others it means if it ever goes above 0 there's a problem. "Raw values" is the actual value of that attribute.

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In addition to what the others have said, a good SSD should last 10-15 years in normal desktop-usage without any additional steps needed. There are, of course, the occasional bad ones out there, but really, you shouldn't worry about your SSD for years to come.

Hand, n. A singular instrument worn at the end of the human arm and commonly thrust into somebody’s pocket.

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11 minutes ago, WereCatf said:

In addition to what the others have said, a good SSD should last 10-15 years in normal desktop-usage without any additional steps needed. There are, of course, the occasional bad ones out there, but really, you shouldn't worry about your SSD for years to come.

This is true. They are not prove to damage in the same way as a HDD. In my experience they also last much longer, but many people will still argue that fact with me.

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3 minutes ago, AngryBeaver said:

This is true. They are not prove to damage in the same way as a HDD. In my experience they also last much longer, but many people will still argue that fact with me.

Well, you know how bad news and experiences always live a lot longer than good ones? It's just (rather silly) human psychology; the first SSDs were pretty unreliable and didn't last all that long in general, and people like to keep thinking those experiences from back then are valid wrt. modern drives, too, and then they spread the misconceptions forward and...well, here we are.

Hand, n. A singular instrument worn at the end of the human arm and commonly thrust into somebody’s pocket.

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Something that you need to know is that the drives are created to support very high amounts of read and writes, that makes a normal user almost unable to reach the daily limit of IOPS. If you really want to know or have a proximate number of how much data your drive supports, you will need to do some math and divide the years of warranty by the total of load cycles, so if you have a drive that supports 300,000 load cycles and the capacity is 1 TB, that means the drive can be filled out and emptied 300,000 that amount, sounds redundant I know! And let's say that yo only have 3 years of warranty, so it would 300,000TB divided in 36 months, that gives a total of 8333.33TB per month maximum, split that in 365 which is the days in a year (Really! No way! ?) and it gives you about 22TB limit per day of load cycles, who in the world writes that amount of data? Data centers maybe? but someone at home I sincerely doubt it...

 

 

Seagate Technology | Official Forums Team

IronWolf Drives for NAS Applications - SkyHawk Drives for Surveillance Applications - BarraCuda Drives for PC & Gaming

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I see this same argument each and every day, about the write endurance of NAND flash, and how a well designed SSD will last for decades in normal use situations. And that is true, from a purely idealized standpoint. But it is rarely, if ever that physical pages wearing out cause an SSD to fail.

Typically, SSD's die when they lose track of the physical layout of the order of the blocks of their NAND flash, as mapped to the LBA's the system is requesting. Modern devices have numerous safeguards against this exact issue, and if you crack open any modern SSD, you will find a significant array of capacitors whose express purpose is to hold the device up long enough (in case of an unexpected power cut) to flush the mapping table back from RAM to permanent storage. If the mapping table is lost or damaged, the device can't boot, and everything is destroyed.

Don't come complaining to me about write endurance. It's like scrapping a car as the crank shaft wore out. Not strictly impossible, but unlikely to be the reason...

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