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Ryzen 3 2200G Overclocking

Go to solution Solved by Slottr,

You can overclock with B350/450 and x370/470

So based on what I have heard you need a motherboard with a Z or a X in the chipset name to be able to overclock. I'm looking at building a budget PC and don't want an i3. So to close the preformance gap I want to overclock. I'm getting a RX 580 with it.

 

 But I have seen videos of people overclocking with a B350 chipset. So I am wondering do I need a X470 chipset board to overclock or not? 

 

Also prices on the Ryzen 3 2200g are around $100, and the RX 580 I found at around $200. I'm not getting a 1060 3gb which is lower priced (like $159) because of the memory size. Plus Ryzen + RX.

(Photo of B350 chipset board reviews saying its overclockable)

Screenshot_20181028-202038_Chrome.jpg

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Intel is the only one where one motherboard chipset overclocks. AMD has only one chipset that doesn't overclock.

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8 minutes ago, Slottr said:

You can overclock with B350/450 and x370/470

So I'm good when it come to overclocking with AMD?

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Just now, SirKevin said:

So I'm good when it come to overclocking with AMD?

As long as you have one of the said chipsets then yes.

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1 minute ago, Slottr said:

As long as you have one of the said chipsets then yes.

Thank you!

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You need  motherboard with a chipset that allows overclocking.

AMD makes the B series and X series of chipsets that support overclocking.  A series (A320 for example) does not.

 

AMD 2200g is not a big overclocker. It has a limited power budget and shares that with the integrated graphics. If the integrated graphics isn't used, you may have some room to overclock, provided the stock cooler can keep up.

 

If you're gonna buy a separate video card, you may be better off buying a Ryzen 1400 (because it's the smaller with SMT, giving you 8 cores). These will also overclock much better.

 

There's a deal right now on newegg for a Powercolor RX570 4 GB for 140$ (after a 20$ mail in rebate) - it's a bit below GTX 1050 in perfomance.

Amazon has a GTX 1050 OC 3 GB for 145$ : https://www.amazon.com/Gigabyte-Geforce-DisplayPorts-PCI-Express-GV-N1050OC-3GL/dp/B07F9M9ZYP

 

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If you care about upgradability about the CPU and will go to 6 core models, better get a better board than that.

3 minutes ago, mariushm said:

, you may be better off buying a Ryzen 1400 (because it's the smaller with SMT, giving you 8 cores)

considering how close the prices are between 1400 and 2600, I'd say that's a stupid idea

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1 minute ago, Jurrunio said:

considering how close the prices are between 1400 and 2600, I'd say that's a stupid idea

I guess it depends on the market, here there's around 20$ difference but I see on Amazon it's only 10$ difference. In that case indeed, 2600 is a much better deal.

 

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4 minutes ago, mariushm said:

You need  motherboard with a chipset that allows overclocking.

AMD makes the B series and X series of chipsets that support overclocking.  A series (A320 for example) does not.

 

AMD 2200g is not a big overclocker. It has a limited power budget and shares that with the integrated graphics. If the integrated graphics isn't used, you may have some room to overclock, provided the stock cooler can keep up.

 

If you're gonna buy a separate video card, you may be better off buying a Ryzen 1400 (because it's the smaller with SMT, giving you 8 cores)

So if I get a Non-integrated graphics CPU I can reach higher overclock speeds? Because Ryzen 5 1400 base clock is 3.2 and the base of the Ryzen 3 2200G 3.5. 

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7 minutes ago, Jurrunio said:

If you care about upgradability about the CPU and will go to 6 core models, better get a better board than that.

considering how close the prices are between 1400 and 2600, I'd say that's a stupid idea

True true. I am going to buy around cyber monday for low prices, so I might go with a Ryzen 5 in the end.

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14 minutes ago, SirKevin said:

So if I get a Non-integrated graphics CPU I can reach higher overclock speeds? Because Ryzen 5 1400 base clock is 3.2 and the base of the Ryzen 3 2200G 3.5. 

As Jurrunio said, ignore the 1400 as it's not good deal, 2600 is almost the same price and it's 3.4 Ghz base, 3.9 ghz turbo.

 

AMD doesn't make separate silicon chips for each processor model, they make one chip for all Ryzen without grahics,and one chip for Ryzen with graphics.

They're trying to get all chips at the maximum performance (like 1800x or 2700x) but for various reasons some aren't as good as other chips (so for example a chip may overheat at 3.9 Ghz so they sell it as a 3.2 ghz processor like ryzen 3 1200), and some chips may be perfectly fine performance wise but one core may be defective (so AMD disables cores and sells the cpu as a lower model). So a chip like 2600 (6 core/12 threads) or 1400 (4core/8 threads) may overclock very well, it depends on your luck

 

With 2200g, chances are if the processor was capable of some substantial overclocking, it would have been sold as 2400g. There's a high chance 2200g are 2400g processors that can't overclock well, or processors that had some kind of errors in the gpu part of the chip (and they disabled those non functioning segments of the video card)

 

 

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3 minutes ago, mariushm said:

As Jurrunio said, ignore the 1400 as it's not good deal, 2600 is almost the same price and it's 3.4 Ghz base, 3.9 ghz turbo.

 

AMD doesn't make separate silicon chips for each processor model, they make one chip for all Ryzen without grahics,and one chip for Ryzen with graphics.

They're trying to get all chips at the maximum performance (like 1800x or 2700x) but for various reasons some aren't as good as other chips, and some chips may be perfectly fine performance wise but one core may be defective (so AMD disabled two cores and sells the cpu as a lower model). So a chip like 2600 (6 core/12 threads) or 1400 (4core/8 threads) may overclock very well, it depends on your luck

 

With 2200g, chances are if the processor was capable of some substantial overclocking, it would have been sold as 2400g. There's a high chance 2200g are 2400g processors that can't overclock well, or processors that had some kind of errors in the gpu part of the chip (and they disabled those non functioning segments of the video card)

 

 

So I'll go with the 2600 if I can find a good deal on it during cyber monday. Just got to look up videos on the differences of B350/B450 and X370/X470. Thanks!

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The main differences is that X series allows splitting the 16 pci-e lanes from the processor (meant for video cards) in 2 slots, each with 8 lanes.

Basically, it makes SLI possible, for nVidia cards. nVidia insists on minim x8 slots (lanes) to enable SLI, AMD doesn't care.

AMD allows Crossfire even with cards installed in slots provided by the chipset or with only 4 lanes. 

 

B series motherboards will have only one x16 slot for video cards. There may be a second x16 slot on the motherboard but the pci-e lanes in that slot would come from the chipset (and usually there's only 4 actual lanes in the slot)

The other differences between chipsets are mainly that the X series offers 2 more USB 3 slots and if I remember correctly 2 more SATA ports

 

Motherboard manufacturers may get more fancy and add more stuff to differentiate their models.

 

 

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