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will a 8pin(4+4) EPS (CPU) work for a 8-pin EATX 12V power connector?

BootyDustBandit
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Go to solution Solved by mariushm,

Whoever said that is a moron.

 

The motherboard will take as much energy through that connector as it needs.  You only need to make sure that the amount of energy flowing between power supply and motherboard isn't more than the connectors (the pins inside that make the contact) can handle.

So, more wires between the power supply and motherboard can only make things better, but from a certain point, the benefits of adding more wires and making connectors with more pins are extremely small.

 

Power is  voltage (V) and current (I) ... these two multiplied gives you watts

The voltage is fixed by the power supply at 12v so depending on how much the processor has to work, the total power consumed by the cpu will change, so since the voltage is fixed only the current will change.

The connectors used on motherboards and power supplies allow to transfer up to 9A of current safely, through each pin in the connector. That means each pair of wires (because you have positive and negative wires) is meant to transfer up to 12v x 9A = 108w.

 

The people that made the ATX standard decided that a 4 pin CPU connector should not transfer more than 8A through each pair of wires (for safety reasons, to reduce risk of connectors overheating and so on), therefore through a 4 pin connector, the motherboard can transfer up to 2 pairs x 12v x 8A = 192 watts

 

If you install both 4 pin connectors, the ATX standard says the motherboard is allowed to transfer no more than 7A through each pair, so you have 4 pairs x 12v x 7A = 336 watts.

 

So more wires means there's possibility to transfer more power but even if the amount of power is small, more wires just helps spreading the current through more wires, so there's a bit less energy losses in the wires.

 

Your CPU has a TDP rating... that's how much heat it can safely dissipate in a heatsink/cooler but it's a good hint about how much power your processor will consume... for example, a CPU with a 95w TDP will probably consume around 110-130w when used at its maximum.

For reference, an 8 core AMD 1800x will only use up to around 140w, and the 2700x will probably go up to around 160w 

 

So, in most cases connecting a single 4 pin cpu connector should be fine, but it's always better to connect both 4pin segments.

 

 

I have read many posts but they all seem to give differing answers and opinions. Some say that this could ruin the motherboard/void your warranty on the motherboard. Others say that plugging both of the 4 pin EPS connectors into the 8 pin EATX connector could result in lost performance of the CPU and might make my PC randomly shut off when my CPU is under load. I am building my 'first' gaming rig here and i want to get this right on the first try cause if this thing is gonna run me 2,000 dollars i would at least like it to work XD.

This is my PSU-
https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA6ZP76J4883

This is my motherboard-
https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813119035R&ignorebbr=1

If you need more info let me know and i will send that over right away.



P.S. if this is a really dumb question don't be afraid to let me know, i am pretty new to PC building (at least with new hardware) so there are a lot of things i don't know. 

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I have no idea who said not to plug in all 8 CPU power pins, but you definitely should. You're getting a very expensive motherboard and power supply, so I assume you're getting a nice fancy expensive CPU too, so it needs a lot of power.

I WILL find your ITX build thread, and I WILL recommend the SIlverstone Sugo SG13B

 

Primary PC:

i7 8086k (won) - EVGA Z370 Classified K - G.Skill Trident Z RGB - WD SN750 - Jedi Order Titan Xp - Hyper 212 Black (with RGB Riing flair) - EVGA G3 650W - dual booting Windows 10 and Linux - Black and green theme, Razer brainwashed me.

Draws 400 watts under max load, for reference.

 

Linux Proliant ML150 G6:

Dual Xeon X5560 - 24GB ECC DDR3 - GTX 750 TI - old Seagate 1.5TB HDD - dark mode Ubuntu (and Win7, cuz why not)

 

How many watts do I need? Seasonic Focus thread, PSU misconceptions, protections explainedgroup reg is bad

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can i just ask what youre going to be running off that overkill supernova? 

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I strongly suggest that you don't get that parts combination. The motherboard is an overpriced piece of crap, and the PSU can't be fully used with the motherboard in a sensible configuration. 

 

The 4+4 pin connector is split so that you can power both 8 pin and 4 pin connectors for the CPU. 

:)

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2 minutes ago, seon123 said:

I strongly suggest that you don't get that parts combination. The motherboard is an overpriced piece of crap, and the PSU can't be fully used with the motherboard in a sensible configuration. 

 

The 4+4 pin connector is split so that you can power both 8 pin and 4 pin connectors for the CPU. 

$135 for a strix Z370 board? I disagree, especially given the looks of the vrm cooling. What would you recommend at this price point? 

I WILL find your ITX build thread, and I WILL recommend the SIlverstone Sugo SG13B

 

Primary PC:

i7 8086k (won) - EVGA Z370 Classified K - G.Skill Trident Z RGB - WD SN750 - Jedi Order Titan Xp - Hyper 212 Black (with RGB Riing flair) - EVGA G3 650W - dual booting Windows 10 and Linux - Black and green theme, Razer brainwashed me.

Draws 400 watts under max load, for reference.

 

Linux Proliant ML150 G6:

Dual Xeon X5560 - 24GB ECC DDR3 - GTX 750 TI - old Seagate 1.5TB HDD - dark mode Ubuntu (and Win7, cuz why not)

 

How many watts do I need? Seasonic Focus thread, PSU misconceptions, protections explainedgroup reg is bad

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Whoever said that is a moron.

 

The motherboard will take as much energy through that connector as it needs.  You only need to make sure that the amount of energy flowing between power supply and motherboard isn't more than the connectors (the pins inside that make the contact) can handle.

So, more wires between the power supply and motherboard can only make things better, but from a certain point, the benefits of adding more wires and making connectors with more pins are extremely small.

 

Power is  voltage (V) and current (I) ... these two multiplied gives you watts

The voltage is fixed by the power supply at 12v so depending on how much the processor has to work, the total power consumed by the cpu will change, so since the voltage is fixed only the current will change.

The connectors used on motherboards and power supplies allow to transfer up to 9A of current safely, through each pin in the connector. That means each pair of wires (because you have positive and negative wires) is meant to transfer up to 12v x 9A = 108w.

 

The people that made the ATX standard decided that a 4 pin CPU connector should not transfer more than 8A through each pair of wires (for safety reasons, to reduce risk of connectors overheating and so on), therefore through a 4 pin connector, the motherboard can transfer up to 2 pairs x 12v x 8A = 192 watts

 

If you install both 4 pin connectors, the ATX standard says the motherboard is allowed to transfer no more than 7A through each pair, so you have 4 pairs x 12v x 7A = 336 watts.

 

So more wires means there's possibility to transfer more power but even if the amount of power is small, more wires just helps spreading the current through more wires, so there's a bit less energy losses in the wires.

 

Your CPU has a TDP rating... that's how much heat it can safely dissipate in a heatsink/cooler but it's a good hint about how much power your processor will consume... for example, a CPU with a 95w TDP will probably consume around 110-130w when used at its maximum.

For reference, an 8 core AMD 1800x will only use up to around 140w, and the 2700x will probably go up to around 160w 

 

So, in most cases connecting a single 4 pin cpu connector should be fine, but it's always better to connect both 4pin segments.

 

 

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Just now, fasauceome said:

$135 for a strix Z370 board? I disagree, especially given the looks of the vrm cooling. What would you recommend at this price point? 

Literally anything else. Any cheap Z370 board with VRM heatsinks would make more sense, as they are the same thing, but cheaper.

The Z370H uses the crappy 4 phase VRM, just like you find on the Z370P and the TUF. 

The decent Strix boards start with the Z370F and Z370G. 

:)

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8 minutes ago, seon123 said:

Literally anything else. Any cheap Z370 board with VRM heatsinks would make more sense, as they are the same thing, but cheaper.

The Z370H uses the crappy 4 phase VRM, just like you find on the Z370P and the TUF. 

The decent Strix boards start with the Z370F and Z370G. 

Ah, well as i said i am pretty inexperienced, especially in the motherboard field. I just picked something cheap that supported my cpu and graphics card with some room for expansion.

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9 minutes ago, seon123 said:

Literally anything else. Any cheap Z370 board with VRM heatsinks would make more sense, as they are the same thing, but cheaper.

The Z370H uses the crappy 4 phase VRM, just like you find on the Z370P and the TUF. 

The decent Strix boards start with the Z370F and Z370G. 

I see what appear to be 6 VRM phases in the imagery provided in Newegg

I WILL find your ITX build thread, and I WILL recommend the SIlverstone Sugo SG13B

 

Primary PC:

i7 8086k (won) - EVGA Z370 Classified K - G.Skill Trident Z RGB - WD SN750 - Jedi Order Titan Xp - Hyper 212 Black (with RGB Riing flair) - EVGA G3 650W - dual booting Windows 10 and Linux - Black and green theme, Razer brainwashed me.

Draws 400 watts under max load, for reference.

 

Linux Proliant ML150 G6:

Dual Xeon X5560 - 24GB ECC DDR3 - GTX 750 TI - old Seagate 1.5TB HDD - dark mode Ubuntu (and Win7, cuz why not)

 

How many watts do I need? Seasonic Focus thread, PSU misconceptions, protections explainedgroup reg is bad

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2 minutes ago, fasauceome said:

I see what appear to be 6 VRM phases in the imagery provided in Newegg

4 for Vcore. That's what matters, because that's what's going to get hot. 

3 minutes ago, BootyDustBandit said:

Ah, well as i said i am pretty inexperienced, especially in the motherboard field. I just picked something cheap that supported my cpu and graphics card with some room for expansion.

If you want help with your build, there's a new builds and planning section. You can ask there, if you want. 

:)

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15 minutes ago, mariushm said:

Whoever said that is a moron.

 

The motherboard will take as much energy through that connector as it needs.  You only need to make sure that the amount of energy flowing between power supply and motherboard isn't more than the connectors (the pins inside that make the contact) can handle.

So, more wires between the power supply and motherboard can only make things better, but from a certain point, the benefits of adding more wires and making connectors with more pins are extremely small.

 

Power is  voltage (V) and current (I) ... these two multiplied gives you watts

The voltage is fixed by the power supply at 12v so depending on how much the processor has to work, the total power consumed by the cpu will change, so since the voltage is fixed only the current will change.

The connectors used on motherboards and power supplies allow to transfer up to 9A of current safely, through each pin in the connector. That means each pair of wires (because you have positive and negative wires) is meant to transfer up to 12v x 9A = 108w.

 

The people that made the ATX standard decided that a 4 pin CPU connector should not transfer more than 8A through each pair of wires (for safety reasons, to reduce risk of connectors overheating and so on), therefore through a 4 pin connector, the motherboard can transfer up to 2 pairs x 12v x 8A = 192 watts

 

If you install both 4 pin connectors, the ATX standard says the motherboard is allowed to transfer no more than 7A through each pair, so you have 4 pairs x 12v x 7A = 336 watts.

 

So more wires means there's possibility to transfer more power but even if the amount of power is small, more wires just helps spreading the current through more wires, so there's a bit less energy losses in the wires.

 

Your CPU has a TDP rating... that's how much heat it can safely dissipate in a heatsink/cooler but it's a good hint about how much power your processor will consume... for example, a CPU with a 95w TDP will probably consume around 110-130w when used at its maximum.

For reference, an 8 core AMD 1800x will only use up to around 140w, and the 2700x will probably go up to around 160w 

 

So, in most cases connecting a single 4 pin cpu connector should be fine, but it's always better to connect both 4pin segments.

 

 

I was just asking about compatibility between the two but as fasauceome said, i have a poor choice in motherboard so i think i'll change that to whatever he suggested the Z370f 

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2 minutes ago, seon123 said:

4 for Vcore. That's what matters, because that's what's going to get hot. 

If you want help with your build, there's a new builds and planning section. You can ask there, if you want. 

okay, i'll head there and see what i get.
(probably going to get bombarded by people telling me not to get a 2080 Ti)

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2 minutes ago, BootyDustBandit said:

I was just asking about compatibility between the two but as fasauceome said, i have a poor choice in motherboard so i think i'll change that to whatever he suggested the Z370f 

Sure, I'll steal the credit for that, right @seon123?

I WILL find your ITX build thread, and I WILL recommend the SIlverstone Sugo SG13B

 

Primary PC:

i7 8086k (won) - EVGA Z370 Classified K - G.Skill Trident Z RGB - WD SN750 - Jedi Order Titan Xp - Hyper 212 Black (with RGB Riing flair) - EVGA G3 650W - dual booting Windows 10 and Linux - Black and green theme, Razer brainwashed me.

Draws 400 watts under max load, for reference.

 

Linux Proliant ML150 G6:

Dual Xeon X5560 - 24GB ECC DDR3 - GTX 750 TI - old Seagate 1.5TB HDD - dark mode Ubuntu (and Win7, cuz why not)

 

How many watts do I need? Seasonic Focus thread, PSU misconceptions, protections explainedgroup reg is bad

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i mean seon did give me the answer to my question, you kinda just told me my motherboard choice was doo doo XD

1 minute ago, fasauceome said:

Sure, I'll steal the credit for that, right @seon123?

 

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1 minute ago, BootyDustBandit said:

i mean seon did give me the answer to my question, you kinda just told me my motherboard choice was doo doo XD

 

Nah I actually said it was good since I forgot about vcore

I WILL find your ITX build thread, and I WILL recommend the SIlverstone Sugo SG13B

 

Primary PC:

i7 8086k (won) - EVGA Z370 Classified K - G.Skill Trident Z RGB - WD SN750 - Jedi Order Titan Xp - Hyper 212 Black (with RGB Riing flair) - EVGA G3 650W - dual booting Windows 10 and Linux - Black and green theme, Razer brainwashed me.

Draws 400 watts under max load, for reference.

 

Linux Proliant ML150 G6:

Dual Xeon X5560 - 24GB ECC DDR3 - GTX 750 TI - old Seagate 1.5TB HDD - dark mode Ubuntu (and Win7, cuz why not)

 

How many watts do I need? Seasonic Focus thread, PSU misconceptions, protections explainedgroup reg is bad

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Just now, fasauceome said:

Nah I actually said it was good since I forgot about vcore

huh......i don't even know what that is XD
(ik i'm out of my league here with these components...i know like...1% of the stuff you guys said XD)

 

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1 minute ago, BootyDustBandit said:

so who do i say solved it?

I'd say there's more to it. Get a new thread in "new builds and planning" with a more robust parts list.

I WILL find your ITX build thread, and I WILL recommend the SIlverstone Sugo SG13B

 

Primary PC:

i7 8086k (won) - EVGA Z370 Classified K - G.Skill Trident Z RGB - WD SN750 - Jedi Order Titan Xp - Hyper 212 Black (with RGB Riing flair) - EVGA G3 650W - dual booting Windows 10 and Linux - Black and green theme, Razer brainwashed me.

Draws 400 watts under max load, for reference.

 

Linux Proliant ML150 G6:

Dual Xeon X5560 - 24GB ECC DDR3 - GTX 750 TI - old Seagate 1.5TB HDD - dark mode Ubuntu (and Win7, cuz why not)

 

How many watts do I need? Seasonic Focus thread, PSU misconceptions, protections explainedgroup reg is bad

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Just now, fasauceome said:

I'd say there's more to it. Get a new thread in "new builds and planning" with a more robust parts list.

ok

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