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Bluetooth Phone Call Audio Quality on iPhone SE - Why is it bad?

jpguitar
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Hey everyone,

 

I have a question that will definitely influence the next phone I purchase.  I currently have an iPhone SE (love Android, too, but at the time I wanted a powerful phone with a small form factor) and the phone call quality on bluetooth in my 2017 Honda Fit is definitely poor compared to being plugged into the headphone jack.  I am wondering if this has more to do with the bluetooth on my particular device, bluetooth in general, or the bluetooth in my car.

 

Since many modern phones are doing away with the headphone jack, it worries me that my options will be quite limited if my phone call (while in car) quality will HAVE to depend on having a headphone jack.  I travel often in my car and very much depend on great audio quality during phone calls while in the car.  

 

However, if newer phones w/out headphone jacks have much better bluetooth phone call audio quality, then I'd feel more comfortable upgrading to a phone w/out a headphone jack.  Of course, there's no way I can ever test that out.  So, I'm wondering what your experiences are with bluetooth phone call audio quality on your device.  If, across the board, it really is just mediocre and a headphone jack is needed to retain great audio quality, then I'll consider an LG V40 or Samsung Galaxy S9 device for my upgrade.

 

I hope I worded this all in a way that makes sense!

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Bluetooth 4.2 is limited compared to Bluetooth 5. When I call using Bluetooth 4.2 headphones using my S9, I feel no difference, but the moment I turn on any graphic intensive task (ex. almost any android game), that's when I hear a slight 0.5 of lag.

 

So far, a wired connection is still superior compared to Bluetooth 4.2. It's been a while since Bluetooth 5 has been released. Although most flagships today come with Bluetooth 5, most headphones do not. Both devices (phone and headphones) need to be Bluetooth 5 compatible to work. If one device is not Bluetooth 5 compatible, both devices will automatically switch to Bluetooth 4.2 or even lower.

 

You can't expecet the same superior connection you get from wired headphones compared to Bluetooth 4.2 headphones. (Bluetooth connection quality can also vary depending on headphones, even if its Bluetooth 4.2)

 

To conclude, a wired connection will always have a better connection than Bluetooth 4.2. But once Bluetooth 5 becomes more mainstream, it might as well revolutionize Bluetooth for good, if the advertised connection speed matches everyday performance.

 

Also, check if your headphones is either Bluetooth 4, 4.1, or 4.2. If it's not 4.2, that might be the issue.

-Kevin-

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20 minutes ago, krkevin said:

Bluetooth 4.2 is limited compared to Bluetooth 5. When I call using Bluetooth 4.2 headphones using my S9, I feel no difference, but the moment I turn on any graphic intensive task (ex. almost any android game), that's when I hear a slight 0.5 of lag.

 

So far, a wired connection is still superior compared to Bluetooth 4.2. It's been a while since Bluetooth 5 has been released. Although most flagships today come with Bluetooth 5, most headphones do not. Both devices (phone and headphones) need to be Bluetooth 5 compatible to work. If one device is not Bluetooth 5 compatible, both devices will automatically switch to Bluetooth 4.2 or even lower.

 

You can't expecet the same superior connection you get from wired headphones compared to Bluetooth 4.2 headphones. (Bluetooth connection quality can also vary depending on headphones, even if its Bluetooth 4.2)

 

To conclude, a wired connection will always have a better connection than Bluetooth 4.2. But once Bluetooth 5 becomes more mainstream, it might as well revolutionize Bluetooth for good, if the advertised connection speed matches everyday performance.

 

Also, check if your headphones is either Bluetooth 4, 4.1, or 4.2. If it's not 4.2, that might be the issue.

Hmmm ok, interesting.  Thank you so much for taking the time to write this post.  So, maybe the issue is actually the Bluetooth in my 2017 Honda Fit...

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1 hour ago, jpguitar said:

Hmmm ok, interesting.  Thank you so much for taking the time to write this post.  So, maybe the issue is actually the Bluetooth in my 2017 Honda Fit...

Your welcome. :)

Yes, that may be the issue, since car manufactures tend not to implement the best Bluetooth hardware, especially in less-expensive models.

-Kevin-

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2 hours ago, krkevin said:

Your welcome. :)

Yes, that may be the issue, since car manufactures tend not to implement the best Bluetooth hardware, especially in less-expensive models.

Good point!  I guess the last thing I wonder is, do the headphone dongles mean you can plug into the AUX jack in the car?  And if so, are there dongles that allow plugging into the car as well as simultaneously charging the phone?

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4 hours ago, jpguitar said:

Good point!  I guess the last thing I wonder is, do the headphone dongles mean you can plug into the AUX jack in the car?  And if so, are there dongles that allow plugging into the car as well as simultaneously charging the phone?

There's no results on regarding the part where you can use the dongle into the car, but I've never heard people do it either, so I highly doubt it will work that way. Also, I never used a dongle, ever. I own a Galaxy S9 currently.

 

No phone has two USB type C ports, but there are dongles that allow you to charge and listen with wired headphones at the same time, like these https://apple.co/2EoHaAd

 

Personally, I think it will be very hard for you to live without a headphone jack. Don't get a phone without a headphone jack, because remembering both the headphones and dongle can be very annoying. If you lose it, its $10.

-Kevin-

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4 minutes ago, krkevin said:

There's no results on regarding the part where you can use the dongle into the car, but I've never heard people do it either, so I highly doubt it will work that way. Also, I never used a dongle, ever. I own a Galaxy S9 currently.

 

No phone has two USB type C ports, but there are dongles that allow you to charge and listen with wired headphones at the same time, like these https://apple.co/2EoHaAd

 

Personally, I think it will be very hard for you to live without a headphone jack. Don't get a phone without a headphone jack, because remembering both the headphones and dongle can be very annoying. If you lose it, its $10.

Honestly, I think you're right.  It'll limit options and I've been surprised with how much I've enjoyed iOS, but in my specific use-case scenario, I think I really do need it.  

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