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warning to macbook users who have booted Linux on their systems.

i noticed that my macbook pro (15" Late 2011)'s cpu would go over 90 degrees celsius and would throttle down to 800mhz because of that. the fans would stay at their idle speed of 2000 rpm.

 

i have rectified this problem using this app: https://github.com/dgraziotin/mbpfan

which allows me to set a custom fan speed based on temperature. 

 

so yeah. make sure you do this otherwise your macbook will overheat and throttle down it's cpu clockspeed. i don't know if this is an issue on other models or other distro's but it definitely is on mine using manjaro. 

She/Her

MacBook Pro 13" Early 2015 | i5 5257U | Intel Iris 6100 | 8GB Ram | 120GB SSD | macOS Monterey

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Macbooks need fan control in general, on all platforms. When I had my Retina 2015 13" it would spike to 80+ degrees without heavy loads and this was said to be normal behaviour. No fan speed increase at all. I just used macsfancontrol on macOS and Windows and that worked much better. 

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4 hours ago, NelizMastr said:

Macbooks need fan control in general, on all platforms. When I had my Retina 2015 13" it would spike to 80+ degrees without heavy loads and this was said to be normal behaviour. No fan speed increase at all. I just used macsfancontrol on macOS and Windows and that worked much better. 

mine did that too, but never to 90+ without any fan speed increase. 

She/Her

MacBook Pro 13" Early 2015 | i5 5257U | Intel Iris 6100 | 8GB Ram | 120GB SSD | macOS Monterey

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Well, on my old MBP from 2009, IIRC on OS X it way way more quiet than on Linux (and while CPU was quite hot, it didn't throttle), but in Linux without fan control, the fan would spin at 100% no matter the load (problem: this is unbearably loud). So I needed fan control in Linux just to get a reasonable noise level from the Macbook.

 

So in my case, it is converse to OPs situation (but different model MacBook Pro). So I agree, fan control is needed. In any case, it should not be a surprise you need fan control (and other tweaks) on an OS not supported by the manufacturer...

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Just now, Wild Penquin said:

Well, on my old MBP from 2009, IIRC on OS X it way way more quiet than on Linux (and while CPU was quite hot, it didn't throttle), but in Linux without fan control, the fan would spin at 100% no matter the load (problem: this is unbearably loud). So I needed fan control in Linux just to get a reasonable noise level from the Macbook.

 

So in my case, it is converse to OPs situation (but different model MacBook Pro). So I agree, fan control is needed. In any case, it should not be a surprise you need fan control (and other tweaks) on an OS not supported by the manufacturer...

i didn't need any other tweaks. it runs perfectly fine. the only issue is the fan control. 

She/Her

MacBook Pro 13" Early 2015 | i5 5257U | Intel Iris 6100 | 8GB Ram | 120GB SSD | macOS Monterey

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4 minutes ago, Wild Penquin said:

So in my case, it is converse to OPs situation (but different model MacBook Pro). So I agree, fan control is needed. In any case, it should not be a surprise you need fan control (and other tweaks) on an OS not supported by the manufacturer...

It does not need manufacturer support. Macbooks are the same as PCs. OS needs to support it and that's it. I had macOS for about year on my HP 4540s and did not even hear fan ever and laptop ran very cool and actualy lasted on battery longer then on windows or linux. Clearly apple does not support HP laptops nor HP supports macOS but it worked better then windows on it.

Computer users fall into two groups:
those that do backups
those that have never had a hard drive fail.

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Just means that your Linux version isn’t talkig to the SMC and reporting the temps for the fans. 

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3 hours ago, DrMacintosh said:

Just means that your Linux version isn’t talkig to the SMC and reporting the temps for the fans. 

it is. i can read out the temperature and fan rpm. 

She/Her

MacBook Pro 13" Early 2015 | i5 5257U | Intel Iris 6100 | 8GB Ram | 120GB SSD | macOS Monterey

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2 hours ago, firelighter487 said:

it is. i can read out the temperature and fan rpm. 

Hmm, then it must need a fan curve :3 

Laptop: 2019 16" MacBook Pro i7, 512GB, 5300M 4GB, 16GB DDR4 | Phone: iPhone 13 Pro Max 128GB | Wearables: Apple Watch SE | CPU: R5 2600 | Mobo: ASRock B450M Pro4 | RAM: 16GB 2666 | GPU: ASRock RX 5700 8GB | Case: Apple PowerMac G5 | OS: Win 10 | Storage: 480GB PNY SSD & 2TB WD Green HDD | PSU: Corsair CX600M | Display: Dell 27 Gaming Monitor S2719DGF 1440p @155Hz, Dell UZ2215H 21.5" 1080p, ViewSonic VX2450wm-LED 23.6" 1080p | Cooling: Wraith Prism | Keyboard: G610 Orion Cherry MX Brown | Mouse: G303 | Audio: Audio Technica ATH-M50X & Blue Snowball
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Just now, DrMacintosh said:

Hmm, then it must need a fan curve :3 

yep. i did that manually using the app i mentioned in the OP. so it's fine now. but i just thought i'd warn anyone who is going to run Linux on a MacBook to check if the fan curve is correct, because mine got to 90+ degrees and throttled down to 800mhz :( 

She/Her

MacBook Pro 13" Early 2015 | i5 5257U | Intel Iris 6100 | 8GB Ram | 120GB SSD | macOS Monterey

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On 10/11/2018 at 4:53 PM, mate_mate91 said:

It does not need manufacturer support. Macbooks are the same as PCs. OS needs to support it and that's it. I had macOS for about year on my HP 4540s and did not even hear fan ever and laptop ran very cool and actualy lasted on battery longer then on windows or linux. Clearly apple does not support HP laptops nor HP supports macOS but it worked better then windows on it.

Well, this is only partially correct. There are standards for hardware, among controlling fan speed, but these are not always followed. It is not just the fan speed that has standards. Linux as an OS, will need someone to write drivers for non-standard hardware. This can be really difficult if the manufacturers either don't do it themself or release the specification for someone else to do it (=volunteers!). Unfortunately, laptops (or, their manufacturers) are notorious for making their devices non-standard, and only releasing closed-source drivers for their (not users) choice of OS. Sometimes reverse-engineering is needed to get even basic stuff working. Luckily, sometimes they release closed-source drivers for Linux, sometimes even Open Source some part(s) of their drivers. Macbook Pros are not especially well supported on the manufacturers part.

 

That being said, distributions could make life easier for users and automate installation for setting up Laptops and possibly some other more exotic hardware. Often the case is, there is some small third-party (open sourced or closed source) utility to add missing functionality which is not there OOTB. Generally, they don't, since there are limited volunteers and diminishing returns for the needed work to support every piece of hardware out there... so some manual work from the user is needed.

 

Think of Linux (or OpenBSD or any Open Source, free OS) as if you were building a house from stuff you get from the HW store; you will need to do some work yourself. There will always be some manual work for Open Source OSes (unless someone makes some kind of paid distribution / service, which will give enough incentive for someone else to polish the experience for the end user!).

 

p.s.: on my Macbook Pro, in addition to fan speed control, I also needed to 1) find the right Wireless driver - and the closed source driver just stopped working after a recent update, 2) add SysRq support (re-map key configuration on Kernel level), 3) install ReFind (there could have been other solutions but this was easiest) and 4) tweak the Touchpad to my liking. With default drivers it's just way too buggy for two-finger scroll, which is a must for my workflow, and 5) tweak the way screen brightness was set, sine aalthough it was working, it was not working 100% well (not all of the range was in use). Possibly something else I forgot.

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